I wanted to cook the rest of the batter, but didn’t really want to attend to the stove, so I experimented and threw a few in the oven on a buttered cookie sheet at 350. The batter ended up spreading into one thin megapancake, which was sad until I realized that I basically have crepe makings. I’m going to fill them with something delicious for tomorrow’s breakfast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jm16Jr1Qtp8
Leftover chicken or turkey breast, pork chop, burger, or any meat with avocado/guacamole/guacachoke* smeared on top. You can just roast a pound or two of any kind of meat in the oven for 13 minutes or so and then have all that meat for snacks and meals for the week. Sometimes we make 3-pound hams in our smoker, slice it up, put it in a glass container and then I can just grab a piece of ham when I want it. Any meat will do!
Jambalaya can be a very hard recipe to make, which is why it’s good that this uses the slow cooker because you can take out some of that complexity. It’s also a dish that lends itself nicely to Paleo eating because it includes plenty of different meats, as well as a good amount of vegetables. For example there is an entire head of cauliflower added to this, and it helps to balance out all of the sausage and chicken. They make it even easier by using premixed Cajun seasoning, but they also point out that you can use your own if you happen to have some already made.

OK George so I finally found a recipe easy enough to try and all I can say is “All I Want For Christmas is a Blendtec!” I’ve been wanting to make my own nut butters but a regular old food processor does not do the trick. So I improvised and used almond meal. I also can’t eat that many pancakes so I used 2 bananas 2 eggs and 1/2 C almond meal. Then some stuff like ginger, nutmeg. They tasted great but fell apart. Not to worry I will try it again with the nut butter. Thank you!
The main ingredient in traditional pancakes is wheat flour. Since that’s a no-no on the Paleo diet, this recipe uses coconut flour. But you’ll notice that it’s only a little bit of coconut flour – two and a half teaspoons, to be exact – which, if you’ve ever made traditional pancakes will seem like a strangely small amount of flour. But here’s the secret… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=og2X4Tb6LdE
The blender turned out to be the simple solution: We processed all of the liquid ingredients until the mixture was frothy, then added the dry ingredients and processed the batter for a minute longer. Mixing everything in the blender had multiple benefits: It streamlined the recipe, incorporated air into the batter to make fluffier pancakes, and ensured that the batter was perfectly smooth and pourable. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PitZcopXOA

If you love the taste of curry but don’t know how to make it, this soup can serve as a reliable way to get that flavor without having to memorize a difficult recipe or use curry from a jar. There are plenty of ingredients being used here, but you’ll see in the directions that it’s just a matter of combining them all together, so it’s not complicated. You end up with an amazing curry soup that has interesting things like almonds in it to give it a crunch you don’t usually get with curry. They’re also giving it healthy fat and additional protein which is very helpful.
Absolutely amazing! I love your recipes and this one will definitely be a staple for a family weekend breakfast. I have made this recipe using tapioca flour and today, with arrowroot flower. My preference is arrowroot flower. Tapioca flour has it’s place in some recipes but it can lead to a gummy texture, mainly in the middle of whatever it is I’m making. Arrowroot flour made these taste just like the real thing. My husband, who would put extra gluten on food (his running joke) was convinced these were the real thing. I think I’ll start using arrowroot flour for all of my recipes that call for tapioca. Ashley, do they always interchange so well? Thank you for your amazing recipes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
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