This recipe is a little nutty—literally. It uses almond flour as its main dry ingredient and is mixed with almond milk too. If the batter is watery at first, simply add more flour, and feel free to change things up and use hazelnut flour instead. These Paleo pancakes are on the heartier side, especially if you add some tapioca powder, which will help avoid any breakage.
This is like a traditional smoky, garlicky, and salty snack mix but it’s made with only real clean ingredients. It can be somewhat addicting. It’s just a nice pure nutty goodness with smoked spices and garlic infused olive oil. You can make it with any kind of nuts you’d like. Walnuts and pecans were used because they are lots of nooks and crannies for the spices to grab onto and stay. The almonds were used to add some extra crunchiness. There are cashews in the picture.
These mini cheesecakes might take some time to make, but it’s totally worth it. You start by making a batch of chocolate cookies for the base, then create a cheesecake-like middle without using any dairy, and then top it off with coconut cream and cacao nibs for the finale. This is the type of dessert that will make you feel like you’re not on a diet at all, and that goes in line with the Paleo mentality. Even though it’s referred to as the Paleo Diet, it’s more like a lifestyle and a way of being than something that you have to force yourself to do.
Sometimes I just don’t want the banana flavor either. So I decided that processing other fresh fruits/vegetables to the consistency of applesauce would give me some variety. The mildest I have tried so far are apples and zucchini. The eggs really provide the structure, so if it’s a little juicy, like pineapple, you may want just a bit more egg than fruit, and a good hot pan to keep them from spreading too much. However, I have also realized (accidentally the first time) that I can make a thinnish one the size of my skillet, flip it, and have a nice wrap too. Just don’t cook it too dry or it splits like egg when you bend it. Extra coconut oil/butter in the mix helps that a little. Made with pureed homemade salsa, it’s fantastic with some seasoned ground beef, lettuce, tomato, sour cream. Made with pureed zucchini, the most versatile savory (spice it up!) one, I think, that is particularly good with mediterranean-spiced lamb and some garlic and cucumber in sour cream (I miss my shawarma). I’m still working with the ratios to get a wrap that consistently doesn’t break, so I can eat it like a tortilla/flatbread, but I usually end up eating it with a fork any way.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7JHpDDGZUk

Heat a griddle or cast iron skillet (or any other nonstick surface on which you like to make pancakes) over medium heat. Lightly grease your griddle surface with additional coconut oil. Pour the pancake batter about 1/4 cup at a time into rounds. Allow to cook until the edges of the pancakes are set (when they’re set, they’ll lose their shine), about 1 minute. With a wide, thin spatula, turn each pancake over and allow to finish cooking on the other side (about another 30 seconds). Remove the pancakes from the griddle, and repeat with the remaining batter.
These did taste amazing, however I am one of those that cannot get these to stay together to flip them. If I waited long enough to flip without it being a scrambled mess, they were black. Should I try a lower heated skillet for a longer time? Or possibly I am not using enough oil in my skillet? My husband and I both ate them….even scrambled they tasted wonderful. We are new to Paleo and are trying lots of recipes. Thanks for all your ideas!!
Beef jerky is no longer the synthetic, smelly, and sticky beef chunks found at your local gas station. Jerky has had a major makeover and is now the darling of health foodies everywhere, thanks to its variety of flavors and meat options, like turkey and chicken, with their high protein and vitamins. Some notable Paleo jerky brands are Sophia’s Survival Foods Jerky Chews, Steve’s Original, and Nick’s Sticks, which all offer grass-fed and organic jerky. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8t2pdg16t1g
These were really tasty- thank you! A great, simple recipe that seems very adaptable with ingredients I always have on hand – perfect. I made them without the bacon (a sin?) but had some chicken sausage that I made on the side and ate with them for that salty and sweet combo – both for dinner last night and breakfast this morning :) I also finally made your banana bread and that will definitely be a staple recipe! Great work and thank you for sharing! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwmPsvCuzvo
Nina, how much cinnamon do you use for your pancakes? I have tried banana pancakes, with just 2 eggs, a banana and then some cinnamon and vanilla, but….I find seems like the banana tends to overpower things a bit, not sure if I’m not used to or not or if using an organic one would make a difference, but it’s a little bit of an adjustment. Any tips there? A binder may not be a bad idea either…… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqPcH8zEStw
This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.

Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.
These chips aren’t actually made from anything except the cheese. It’s asiago cheese, a hard cheese that doesn’t contain much lactose and is therefore looked upon as OK by some Paleo followers. If you know that you don’t process any cheese well you’ll want to take a pass on this one, but if you can handle it in occasional doses it’s worth it. The two ingredients are asiago cheese and rosemary, so it doesn’t get much simpler. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5n68qEhqIM
I had to follow your link to the crepe pan out of curiosity! Do you know if it works well for making roti? We have a legit Indian roti pan and I’ve been asked several times over the years by friends and family where to find a “roti pan” or if they can just use their cast iron skillet? This seems like it’s pretty close in comparison and sells for a reasonable price!

Hi I am back! I just thought I’d share this with you. I am pre-diabetic. This morning, I was intent on making your pancakes, and I did, shared with my sons. I did not check my blood sugar before, but I thought I’d check it around two hours after. (It’s been 2-1/2 hrs, I believe). I still am full (ate 6 of them pancakes topped with butter and real maple syrup). I expected to see around 110++ because of the bananas, nuts, and maple syrup. Guess what? 99!!! and I am still full. But I gotta keep trying to eat 3 meals a day. Maybe light lunch in another hour… :)
I used a heaping spoonful of crunchy peanut butter and a small banana (about half a normal banana) with an egg and cinnamon. I mashed it up with a spoon in a bowl and put it on a heated nonstick pan with butter on it. I used a small, thin pan over the lowest setting on the smallest gas burner we have. No problems with burning, sticking, or flipping here. They were dense, thin, and tasted like fried peanut butter! My picky non-paleo man seemed to enjoy them with his nutella. They started breaking apart when I added some shredded coconut. I think I’ll add more egg or egg white next time or maybe some baking powder to make them fluffier. Possibly baking would be better. Very good recipe, since it’s hard for me to get a recipe to turn out well. :)
AMAZING! I had my doubts as if these would be close to my beloved pancakes I miss so much. I read through all of the previous comments and took the advice of being very patient with cooking – I always flip the first batch too quickly with any pancake recipe :-) It was so hard to believe they cooked and fluffed just like my totally unhealthy pancakes. George, this one is a keeper for me. I plan to cook a big batch for the week and freeze for breakfasts on the go – no toppings needed for these babies.
This Caprese-style salad is a great Paleo snack when you have just-right produce or an abundance of basil to use up. You’ll substitute mozzarella for creamy avocado loaded on fresh tomato slices. Top each tomato with basil, drizzle with balsamic vinegar and oil and enjoy. This one is great to enjoy while sitting outdoors enjoying a hot summer night.
If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyiCfNSG1_A
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