Sautéed Swiss Chard With Bacon Sautéed Garlic Broccolini Grilled Balsamic Glazed Portobello Mushrooms Grilled Paprika Brussels Sprouts Garlic Green Beans Roasted Mushrooms With Thyme Vegetables in a Creamy Pesto Sauce Spaghetti Squash with Creamy Mushroom Sauce Jalapeno Poppers Creamy Garlic Mushrooms Apple and Vegetable Stir-Fry Mini Pepperoni Pizza Bites Brussels Sprouts With Balsamic and Cranberries Sausage-Stuffed Jalapeño Bites Sweet Potato Bacon Cakes Creamed Spinach Mini Hamburger Bites Oven Roasted Garlic Cabbage Spicy Sweet Potato Wedges Cauliflower Tortillas Sweet Potato Bites with Guacamole and Bacon Zucchini cakes Roasted cauliflower with mint and pomegranate BLT Endive Bites Bell Pepper Pizza Bites Cauliflower and Bacon Hash Pesto Stuffed Mushrooms Oven Fried Pickles
Hard-boiled eggs are a simple and easy snack. They require minimal preparation and you can easily boil a dozen at a time to have on hand as a grab-and-go snack.  While you can couple your eggs with a piece of fruit, some leftover protein, or a cold baked sweet potato for a carbohydrate source, over time the thought of eating another hard-boiled egg may turn your stomach.  If you are looking some delicious variations in the egg department, these suggestions are worth consideration:
Absolutely amazing! I love your recipes and this one will definitely be a staple for a family weekend breakfast. I have made this recipe using tapioca flour and today, with arrowroot flower. My preference is arrowroot flower. Tapioca flour has it’s place in some recipes but it can lead to a gummy texture, mainly in the middle of whatever it is I’m making. Arrowroot flour made these taste just like the real thing. My husband, who would put extra gluten on food (his running joke) was convinced these were the real thing. I think I’ll start using arrowroot flour for all of my recipes that call for tapioca. Ashley, do they always interchange so well? Thank you for your amazing recipes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
I had to follow your link to the crepe pan out of curiosity! Do you know if it works well for making roti? We have a legit Indian roti pan and I’ve been asked several times over the years by friends and family where to find a “roti pan” or if they can just use their cast iron skillet? This seems like it’s pretty close in comparison and sells for a reasonable price!
We’ve been Paleo-ish the past couple of years but with another baby due any day, I’ve been thrilled to find your blog and cookbooks. Sometimes I don’t have the money to keep almond flour on hand and my homemade version doesn’t have the lovely crumb bc it’s not as fine. My 3YO sometimes wants what her older siblings are having. We all tolerate rice flour well and your recipes have been awesome. I think it’s also because you aren’t shy about advising us to use a scale rather than volume measurements. My nonGF husband LOVED the pretzel rolls. (Yeah, I was too lazy to do the pretzel dogs and just made the rolls.) OMG! You so totally rock! I definitely want the new cookbook, too. I hate spending $2 extra to get a GF bun for me and my two kids while eating out or $1.25 for a frozen ok bun. Thanks to you we can eat at home and still have awesome breads and desserts for a fraction of the cost. Thanks again. I will gladly add the new cookbook and will probably just pre-order it.

Before starting on your journey to Paleo, perhaps it was common for you to run to the store and grab a box of highly processed, expensive gluten-free crackers thinking gluten-free must equal health.  Now that you know that gluten-free does not always equal healthy, you may feel a bit stumped as to how to incorporate crackers into your diet.  The good news is that making your own gluten-free, grain-free crackers can be a rather easy process.  Most Paleo cracker recipes have very few ingredients and require very little time to prepare.  If you have never been much of a cracker fan, however, replace the cracker recipe ideas listed with some of your favorite finger veggies and enjoy them with some of the Paleo-friendly dips suggested below:


I always cook a tray of bacon in the oven while the pancakes are on the griddle, and then we make sandwiches with bacon and maple butter. The kids love them for school lunches or afternoon snacks! (Maple butter is just equal amounts of maple syrup and softened or melted butter, blended together until creamy, then put back in the fridge to firm up). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tog85hxZauU
These tomatoes are filled with the irresistible taste of buffalo chicken. Even though chicken wings are easy to make on the Paleo diet, it’s still a good idea to even them out by eating a vegetable along with them. Here you can get the taste of buffalo wings but in bite size form, with no bones, and no need to supplement it because the tomato has you covered. Plus you’re getting all of the benefits that come from eating tomatoes, and this snack will hold you over for quite some time.
These tiny tacos are served up on jicama shells. The rest of the ingredients are placed in the slow cooker until the meat is just right. That means you can pop it in a few hours before the big game, and serve them up when everyone has arrived. They are billed as being great sports food, because they are smaller than a traditional taco, so they’re mini sized and good for serving. But they still have plenty of flavor thanks to all of the cilantro, garlic, lines, and oregano. The jicama shells really help to avoid the use of a flour tortilla.

Calamari is definitely something our ancestors would have eaten if they lived near a shore. Knowing how to catch fish and other sea creatures is what helped us beat out the Neanderthals, so we’ve known a thing or two about seafood for a long time now. This recipe walks you through the steps needed to take calamari and turn it into a delicious salad that works as a starter to a meal, or as a light meal all by itself. If you’re not used to eating things like squid you may have to broaden your palate and try new foods. It’s what Paleo is all about. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srmxhx3sVhI


I had to follow your link to the crepe pan out of curiosity! Do you know if it works well for making roti? We have a legit Indian roti pan and I’ve been asked several times over the years by friends and family where to find a “roti pan” or if they can just use their cast iron skillet? This seems like it’s pretty close in comparison and sells for a reasonable price! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrlFu0Lsqbc
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