These gummy snacks are billed as being anti-inflammatory and use a host of ingredients that have been shown to help curb inflammation in the body, namely turmeric and ginger. The way they’ve made these into gummy form is through the use of gelatin, which is definitely a go on Paleo. There’s also other healthy items to really make these a vitamin-packed snack, including citrus juice of your choice and raw honey. By using natural ingredients like raw honey you’re eating food that is as close to nature as possible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EICS1tZ2Hp4
Everybody gets their own mini personal pizza when you cook up these squash pizzas. Each slice of squash becomes a tiny sized pizza that is loaded up with Paleo friendly toppings. It’s a great way to use up that butternut squash you bought, and simply requires that you top them up with items that you like. They’re recommending meats and veggies so you can keep it Paleo, and really as long as you stick with those two types of foods you’ll be doing just fine.

These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4RrEsZEv3I


Almonds are paleo-approved, but it can sometimes be hard to just stop at a handful. While almonds are packed with protein, healthy fats, and an amino acid L-arginine that can help you burn more fat during workouts, they are also calorie dense—if you’re not careful, you can end up downing hundreds of calories worth of almonds in one sitting. That’s why we love these 100 calorie packs. They’re perfectly portioned and contain only whole natural almonds without sketchy ingredients or additives.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzWfAVhXcNs

This stew is made from a bunch of beef, some blueberries, carrots, and an onion. It may sound like a bit of an odd mix, but trust us, it works. A stew is the perfect platform to construct a great Paleo meal, and here there’s plenty of healthy foods being combined. You’ll get plenty of protein from all of that beef, as well as important minerals like iron. Blueberries consistently make the news because of their antioxidant value, and carrots have long been known to be healthy due to the beta Carotene they contain. Onions also add to the nutritional value of this meal, and it will definitely keep you satisfied for several hours. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwVwQiqe4eM
This recipe is a little nutty—literally. It uses almond flour as its main dry ingredient and is mixed with almond milk too. If the batter is watery at first, simply add more flour, and feel free to change things up and use hazelnut flour instead. These Paleo pancakes are on the heartier side, especially if you add some tapioca powder, which will help avoid any breakage.
Baking powder, on the other hand, typically contains cornstarch, which isn’t appropriate for a Paleo diet. If you can’t purchase Paleo baking powder, made with an appropriate starch, it’s so easy to make yourself with 1 part baking soda, 2 parts cream of tartar and 1/2 part arrowroot or tapioca starch/flour. If you aren’t that strict, though, just use “regular” gluten free baking powder. I won’t tell.
I had to follow your link to the crepe pan out of curiosity! Do you know if it works well for making roti? We have a legit Indian roti pan and I’ve been asked several times over the years by friends and family where to find a “roti pan” or if they can just use their cast iron skillet? This seems like it’s pretty close in comparison and sells for a reasonable price! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrlFu0Lsqbc
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