You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWjvq2GB0uc

One other thing to note here is that I pre-make some of these ingredients, which takes time, but at least it’s not taking time in the middle of the day when I’m trying to work or rush out the door. Also, I don’t mind eating food cold. I know a lot of people can’t stomach the idea of eating cold meat, although that really confuses me because Subway makes billions of dollars every year selling cold meat. Anyway, you can always heat these things up at work or home. And without further ado… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnDzsN7ksME


When I first developed this recipe for Paleo pancakes, I used a tiny bit of coconut flour rather than tapioca starch/flour for structure. The batter was thicker, especially as it sat out, as coconut flour has that tendency, and it was almost impossible to make smaller pancakes. By replacing the coconut flour with a Paleo-friendly starch, the pancakes still have structure but the batter is more flexible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-i2oZWK2pM

Don’t let the green color fool you, these also taste good in addition to being good for you. They contain pistachios, pumpkin seeds, coconut, orange juice, and help seeds, so you know you’re getting plenty of flavor along with the nutritional features of each of these items. The green color comes from the use of spirulina, which adds even more nutrients to the mix. These are raw, so they require no baking which means you mush all of the ingredients together into bar form, let them chill, and they’re ready to eat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHJMOgzbI3w
These did taste amazing, however I am one of those that cannot get these to stay together to flip them. If I waited long enough to flip without it being a scrambled mess, they were black. Should I try a lower heated skillet for a longer time? Or possibly I am not using enough oil in my skillet? My husband and I both ate them….even scrambled they tasted wonderful. We are new to Paleo and are trying lots of recipes. Thanks for all your ideas!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ysLjd-F9dI
Excellent recipe. It turned out great! One thing… my mistake… nothing to do with the recipe, I didn’t read the part to make them tiny at first. So, my first two pancakes were regular pancake sizes and were a little moist in the middle, so the outside ended up being too dry while I was waiting for the inside to cook. HOWEVER, when I poured them in the smaller size as instructed, it turned out great.

These little sandwiches are really pushing the limits of a conventional sandwich. Bacon is serving as the “bread” and guacamole is the thing getting sandwiched. Avocados are bona fide superfood, and contain plenty of potassium, fiber, and healthy fat. Bacon is often the scourge of most diet plans, but on Paleo it is allowed so why not dig in? The two go really well together, and you’ll often find them as add-ons to deli sandwiches because they simply taste that good.
These make a great snack because they have a lot going on. There’s sweet potato in them, so you’ve got fiber built into them. They’ve also cut out all grain, using almond meal and coconut flour instead. The sweetness comes from honey, not from the coconut because the coconut is unsweetened. These aren’t sweet enough to be considered a dessert, and they’re billed as supplying energy thanks to the sweet potato they contain. Sweet potato is great as a snack because it is digested slowly and releases energy over a longer time period. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWy3u38J3aw

These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.
Ideally, if you have a good Paleo breakfast and lunch, you’ll often find you don’t feel hungry and don’t need to snack. If you do find yourself hungry between meals, try eating more at meals (are you consuming enough satiating fat in your meals?). Also, check out the recipe book I've just written with loads of Paleo Breakfast recipes to inspire you.

thank you so much for this recipe! I am now in my eleventh week of Paleo and lucky not to have sugar cravings or need of any breakfast substitute (I never get hungry before noon, so it’s easy to skip breakfast). But the other day, I was taking a little break in between home office work looking for some easy and fast dish and that was when I tried your Paleo Pancakes.


Following a Paleo diet can have really terrific benefits for some people. Abstaining from inflammatory grains, eating more protein and enjoying a variety of fruits and veggies can help you lose weight and feel good. But snacking while being Paleo can be confusing at first. When you go down the Paleo snacks road, gone are the go-to crackers and dip, popcorn and even peanut butter. You can always snack on produce, of course, but sometimes you want something that isn’t a handful of nuts or chopped vegetables.
Anyone who has dietary restrictions and is on a grain-free, gluten-free or dairy-free diet, can tell you that it can be hard to find good delicious and nutritious replacement for their breakfast. Today, I am sharing with you the lightest and fluffiest Paleo pancakes you will ever have the pleasure of eating. They are made with almond flour and a little bit of coconut flour for the best texture.
These tiny tacos are served up on jicama shells. The rest of the ingredients are placed in the slow cooker until the meat is just right. That means you can pop it in a few hours before the big game, and serve them up when everyone has arrived. They are billed as being great sports food, because they are smaller than a traditional taco, so they’re mini sized and good for serving. But they still have plenty of flavor thanks to all of the cilantro, garlic, lines, and oregano. The jicama shells really help to avoid the use of a flour tortilla.
Sally Jones is a writer and editor living in New York City. She has worked at many websites including iVillage, Ladies Home Journal, More, Parenting, Cosmopolitan, The Knot and YourTango, in jobs ranging from editor to COO. Renovation and interior design are her unhealthy obsessions hobbies. She has renovated every home she's lived in, including the rentals, and like... whoa, who does that? You can catch her at her blog Renov8or.

If you follow my Instagram, this comes at no surprise. RXBARs! Gimme em all. These bars are perfect sizes and perfect flavors. Most of them are Paleo and Whole30, except for the peanut varieties, of course. Don’t tell the Paleo police, but the peanut butter flavor is actually one of my faves. They’re all delicious but definitely check out the maple sea salt and mixed berry! As of date, these aren’t available on Thrive Market yet, but you can order them from Paleo By Maileo.
Absolutely amazing! I love your recipes and this one will definitely be a staple for a family weekend breakfast. I have made this recipe using tapioca flour and today, with arrowroot flower. My preference is arrowroot flower. Tapioca flour has it’s place in some recipes but it can lead to a gummy texture, mainly in the middle of whatever it is I’m making. Arrowroot flour made these taste just like the real thing. My husband, who would put extra gluten on food (his running joke) was convinced these were the real thing. I think I’ll start using arrowroot flour for all of my recipes that call for tapioca. Ashley, do they always interchange so well? Thank you for your amazing recipes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
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