Beef, it’s what’s for dinner on the Paleo diet, and these beef kebabs are made with sirloin, a premium cut of meat known for being lean. You want to take extra care to buy grass-fed beef when eating Paleo because it’s what a cow naturally eats, and doesn’t contain all of the additives they put in conventional cattle feed these days. Notice that they’ve also grilled up skewers with just vegetables. That’s because Paleo requires matching your meat intake with your vegetable intake for the right balance. She walks you through how to marinate the meat before grilling them, which ensures they’ll be flavorful and tender.
At some point on the Paleo diet you’re going to crave something sweet, flavorful, and crunchy, and that’s when we’d recommend baking up a batch of these clusters. They use pumpkin seeds, and we’re just finding out how healthy these are, and the benefits they provide. The sweetness comes from coconut sugar and honey, two approved sources of sweet on Paleo. We recommend going with organic raw honey to avoid the processed kind you find on store shelves. The other ingredients are all-natural, just be sure to use organic pumpkin seeds for the best results.
These look so yummy, I am going to try and make them on Sunday! Would you happen to know the nutrition content and how many carbs? I will save these for a once in awhile treat however I am always looking for Paleo style recipes that my carbivore daughter will enjoy. I was thinking of adding a layer of spiced whipped cream. This would make a lovely dessert. Thank you for the recipe.
When I first developed this recipe for Paleo pancakes, I used a tiny bit of coconut flour rather than tapioca starch/flour for structure. The batter was thicker, especially as it sat out, as coconut flour has that tendency, and it was almost impossible to make smaller pancakes. By replacing the coconut flour with a Paleo-friendly starch, the pancakes still have structure but the batter is more flexible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogf0TuIpffg
Perfect pancakes should be fluffy, tender, lightly sweet, and simple to make. For a paleo recipe that would stand up to its traditional counterparts, we started by choosing the flours that would be the base of our recipe. We knew from previous testing that a combination of almond and arrowroot flours would give our pancakes volume and structure; we determined that a 5:1 ratio of almond to arrowroot worked best.

If you’re used to combating the afternoon slump with yogurt, you’ll love this Paleo chia pudding. While the chef here enjoys it at breakfast, it’s really simple to convert this into a snack: instead of making these in a bowl, prepare in mason jars for perfect portions you can take to work with you. Not a big banana fan? Swap in your favorite frozen berries or mangoes instead. I do suggest keeping the sliced almonds in for some healthy fats and crunch.

Heat a griddle or cast iron skillet (or any other nonstick surface on which you like to make pancakes) over medium heat. Lightly grease your griddle surface with additional coconut oil. Pour the pancake batter about 1/4 cup at a time into rounds. Allow to cook until the edges of the pancakes are set (when they’re set, they’ll lose their shine), about 1 minute. With a wide, thin spatula, turn each pancake over and allow to finish cooking on the other side (about another 30 seconds). Remove the pancakes from the griddle, and repeat with the remaining batter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-QfuZ2Ddso
You may need some almond flour in your recipe. I made some paleo pancakes just this morning and mixed the following: 1 mashed up banana, 1 organic egg, 1/2 cup almond flour, 2 T almond butter, cinnamon to taste, and ~1/4 c almond or coconut milk to thin the batter as desired. Butter the pan or use walnut oil, cook as usual. Flip when bubbles form or batter turns golden brown. Top with fruit like strawberries or blueberries, more butter, bacon, or w/ organic 100% maple syrup. This batch makes 6 small, nutty pancakes which serves 2 (unless one is really hungry! I can’t recall where to credit the recipe, but it sure is good.
Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

Hey Tessa! Good question. So after calculating from my credit card, I spend about $275 on average on food without really budgeting. I stick to eggs and chicken as my main form of protein and look for when grassfed beef is on sale. Even at $7 a pound I can get about 3 meals out of that, so it’s not too bad. I will probably be doing a post on this in the next few months when I get back to school and am keeping track of exactly how much I spend on what. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upEoaM5u34Q

These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4RrEsZEv3I
The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body, by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD. This book is billed as a solution for autoimmune diseases, in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells. In the text, Ballantyne discusses her own struggles with autoimmune disease and helps guide readers on how the paleo diet may help relieve their symptoms, too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCFZoqmKf5M
Hopefully everyone knows about these by now, but it’s worth throwing on the list because they come in so handy. They’re available practically everywhere now. From Whole Foods, Amazon, Thrive Market, Co-ops and Target, most of us know we love them! They’re made from all natural ingredients (like everything on this list!) and come in no less than a zillion flavors ;). Try blueberry muffin, cashew cookie, lemon or even mint chip brownie!
Now, there are lots of people who feel iffy about snacking. And I get that. The snacks many of us were brought up and traditionally reach for (animal crackers, pretzels, cheese flavored crackers) are kind of just filling up the belly instead of actually feeding the body what it is actually asking for...which is nutrients and protein! Since moving our family to a mostly-Paleo way of eating a few years ago, our snacking game has totally changed!  Out with the starchy crackers. In with real food, nutrient dense nibbles! Nibbles that a little growing body will actually put to good use! That will actually keep them going until their next meal....with their sanity (and your's) intact.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWjvq2GB0uc
I agree completely! Nuts.com is such a friendly, festive place that I feel guilty for grumbling about the shipping costs. They did send me a sample of calmyrna figs in the order I received yesterday, so I am somewhat mollified, but still!! I am forever rearranging my pantry to better store all of my flours and big jars of flour blends. It was so much easier when I had my one jar of ap wheat flour…
The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.
These are wicked amazing!! I made them the first time, as is, just cut the recipe down to 1/3 so it made 3 small pancakes for just me. As is they were great – really filling (I could hardly finish them all and that’s a rarity for me and pancakes) – but a bit too sweet! I followed the ingredients to a T so I was surprised by the sweetness. I made them this morning but with chunky, organic Peanut Butter instead and added 1/4 tsp salt (because I think pancakes should be a hint salty), 1/4 tsp vanilla and 1 tsp chopped walnuts. This last batch turned out incredible. Thank you for this amazing recipe, George!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNz73Lu0RpU
Dark chocolate is chock-full of antioxidants and rich in good-for-you nutrients like healthy fats, iron, and magnesium. And while you can’t get those benefits from a sugary commercial candy bar, you can get them from these nibs made of pure organic cacao and nothing else. With no added sugar, these bites are a little bitter but perfect for hardcore dark chocolate fans.
Leftover chicken or turkey breast, pork chop, burger, or any meat with avocado/guacamole/guacachoke* smeared on top. You can just roast a pound or two of any kind of meat in the oven for 13 minutes or so and then have all that meat for snacks and meals for the week. Sometimes we make 3-pound hams in our smoker, slice it up, put it in a glass container and then I can just grab a piece of ham when I want it. Any meat will do! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aH5IqMjQm7U
Taro gets the go ahead here as a sort of replacement for potatoes. They are still pretty starchy so it’s up to you whether you want to allow them in your Paleo eating plan. These will satisfy those looking for a plain potato chip fix, because the only ingredients are the taro, salt and pepper, and olive oil. They’ve kept things very simple, which is a mark of a quality Paleo recipe because the more complicated it gets the less likely it is that it’s natural.
These zucchini rolls look so good you might not want to eat them. But you will! They’ve got a really unique list of ingredients that includes bacon, goat cheese, and sun-dried tomatoes, so you’re getting vitamins, minerals, protein, and more from each item used. Even the roll itself is nutritious, because it’s made from zucchini. These roll up into nice bite sizes which makes them great for solo popping or for serving to company. They’re also very easy to make, it’s just a matter of laying out the ingredients and then rolling them up.
These chips are made from parsnips, and most new Paleo followers will probably have a very limited experience with the parsnip. It does find its way into a lot of Paleo cooking because it can be used in many different ways. Don’t knock it till you try it, because they tend to take on the surrounding flavors, in this case yummy maple syrup and coconut oil. So while you may have ignored parsnips a thousand times before, maybe it’s time to give them a chance. You may end up liking them, especially since you can’t go wrong when they’re baked in fat and sugar. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwrHWuqiL1g
You may need some almond flour in your recipe. I made some paleo pancakes just this morning and mixed the following: 1 mashed up banana, 1 organic egg, 1/2 cup almond flour, 2 T almond butter, cinnamon to taste, and ~1/4 c almond or coconut milk to thin the batter as desired. Butter the pan or use walnut oil, cook as usual. Flip when bubbles form or batter turns golden brown. Top with fruit like strawberries or blueberries, more butter, bacon, or w/ organic 100% maple syrup. This batch makes 6 small, nutty pancakes which serves 2 (unless one is really hungry! I can’t recall where to credit the recipe, but it sure is good. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuaUI30NR5E

I only used one banana, one egg, and scraped the bottom of my natural almond butter, a dash of cinnamon, and they were great. I would make the full size if I was feeding my husband too but I just wanted to say that if you want to make just enough for yourself it still works great. I maybe had about 3-4 tbsps of almond butter but I’m not sure. I would definitely make these again, they taste just like banana nut bread to me. Yum! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye-LAMIU_vo
These are delicious! I didn’t have any coconut flour so I used 1/4 of all plant protein powder and they turned out great. I did separate the egg whites and beat them separately. I couldn’t believe how light and fluffy they were, although they were pretty delicate and wanted to fall apart. Next time I think I would add in some starch or binder to hold them together a bit more.
Anyone who has dietary restrictions and is on a grain-free, gluten-free or dairy-free diet, can tell you that it can be hard to find good delicious and nutritious replacement for their breakfast. Today, I am sharing with you the lightest and fluffiest Paleo pancakes you will ever have the pleasure of eating. They are made with almond flour and a little bit of coconut flour for the best texture. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl1hgPDevnc
Porridge is a nice way to start the day because it is warm, a little bit sweet, and it stays with you through the entire morning. But if you are following a traditional porridge recipe you won’t get too far while on Paleo. All of the necessary modifications have been made in this version so you can enjoy it without worrying if you are staying within the guidelines. Eggs, flour, coconut milk, and seasonings have combined to make one yummy porridge. This can serve as a standalone breakfast without any meat eaten at the same time. Paleo does focus on a meat and vegetable balance, but breakfast can be a lighter meal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCx5ZM7fPEE
I have been making pancakes with coconut flour and my husband eats them and doesn’t mind them, but doesn’t love them. I made them with almond flour way back and they were much more satisfying. I live in the Caribbean, so many things are hard to find, but they are making Casava flour, breadfruit flour, pumpkin and green banana flour and I can get chick pea flour which has been good! I would love to try the pumpkin flour in pancakes, but not sure if I would use it the same way you have used the almond flour in this recipe?
Made with eggs, pumpkin purée, and a touch of maple syrup, these Paleo pancakes are everything we love about fall, minus the sugar crash that comes with pumpkin spice everything. This recipe opts for a mix of almond meal, coconut flour, baking powder, and cinnamon, but feel free to experiment with other spices. We love using, you guessed it, actual pumpkin spice, or ground cloves or nutmeg.
No time for a tropical vacation? Make these coconut and pineapple pancakes instead! Mix all the ingredients in a blender and combine freeze-dried pineapple and coconut sugar for a sweet topping. To make this recipe paleo-approved, be sure to swap the baking powder (which contains non-paleo cornstarch) for one of these simple substitutions. Photo and recipe: Carol Kicinski / Simply Gluten-Free https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKF5zGzOkyo
Don’t let the green color fool you, these also taste good in addition to being good for you. They contain pistachios, pumpkin seeds, coconut, orange juice, and help seeds, so you know you’re getting plenty of flavor along with the nutritional features of each of these items. The green color comes from the use of spirulina, which adds even more nutrients to the mix. These are raw, so they require no baking which means you mush all of the ingredients together into bar form, let them chill, and they’re ready to eat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-TDu1F0ZTA
Shepherd’s pie is a popular dish in the UK, but not so much in the States. It’s a shame because it’s very delicious, but it is also made with a lot of ingredients that aren’t necessarily Paleo if it’s made the traditional way. This recipe makes plenty of adjustments so that a Paleo eater can enjoy comforting food. For starters they’ve gotten rid of white potatoes that play such a big role, and replace them with sweet potatoes which are a recommended Paleo food because they are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. The other ingredients all fall well within your Paleo guidelines, so you can eat until satisfied. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_JUritU2IE
This could be the perfect trail mix. It’s full of crunch from a variety of nuts, sweetness from coconut flakes and banana chips and just the right amount of chocolate to curb those cravings. It comes together right in the slow cooker, so your kitchen will smell amazing! Be sure to use coconut oil or ghee instead of butter here to keep it strictly Paleo. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrcSUhdBgtc
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