Well I didn’t have any egg whites on hand so I went forward with sweet potato purée and to my surprise they were great! My husband who is not full time on the paleo diet and remembers “regular” pancakes agreed with me heartily when I said “it’s amazing how pancake like these are.” Our toddlers are allergic to cinnamon so we used allspice and nutmeg. 1/4C of sweet potato purée per egg. I have to admit the toddlers were not sold on them until we added raisins in our latest batch, but I think they’re asserting independence more than expressing true opinions haha. They loved them with raisins! Oh, I also added a bit of flax meal. I might try them again with egg whites or some egg whites some sweet potatoes (thanks Jody!) just because ours were not as filling as others have mentioned them being. We also followed the commenter below by baking them at 400F for 10-12 minutes rather than using a pan. Anyway I know I made a lot of modifications but thanks George for the great basic recipe! They are easy and convenient and I don’t miss the old kind of pancakes one bit when I’m eating them!
Edible seaweeds are too often overlooked on a Paleo diet, but they boast an unparalleled nutritional profile. Among many essential nutrients, most kinds of seaweeds are loaded with iodine, an essential trace element to life. Iodine is especially important for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland. For most people on a SAD diet, the only reliable source of iodine is iodized salt. Many people on a Paleo diet decide to shun added salt completely or to consume unrefined sea salt instead of regular iodized table salt. This is great, but with such a change, an effort should be made to eat iodine rich foods occasionally. Seaweeds are a great option.

These chips are made from butternut squash, but you won’t be able to tell by the way they taste. They bake up so crispy and crunchy you’d swear it was a potato chip if you didn’t know any better. They are using gingerbread seasoning on these, which is an interesting choice for a snack, and sure to give your taste buds a new experience. Compared to most snacks you’ll enjoy the fact that these rank pretty well in terms of the amount of carbs they contain, as well as the calories. Not that you’re counting any of that stuff on Paleo, it’s just nice to know.

Hey, great recipe and site!! FYI, The Paleo Kitchen cookbook has a mayo recipe that is SOOOO much easier…you take 3/4 cut oil of your choice, 1 egg, lemon juice(1 tsp I think), and 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard, place them in a tall, narrow container, and use an immersion blender! Start at the bottom and move the blender upward as the ingredients emulsify. I had quit making my own mayo because the other way was SO time consuming and mine never seemed to come out right, but this version is pretty fool-proof! I use grapeseed oil because the olive oil is a bit bitter for me.
Calamari is definitely something our ancestors would have eaten if they lived near a shore. Knowing how to catch fish and other sea creatures is what helped us beat out the Neanderthals, so we’ve known a thing or two about seafood for a long time now. This recipe walks you through the steps needed to take calamari and turn it into a delicious salad that works as a starter to a meal, or as a light meal all by itself. If you’re not used to eating things like squid you may have to broaden your palate and try new foods. It’s what Paleo is all about.

This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.
If you’re a big fan of chips, you’ll be happy to know that you don’t have to give them up when following the Paleo diet.  While you may not be able to incorporate your favorite brands from childhood or run by the convenience store for a quick snack bag, fruit and veggie chips are a much healthier and lighter alternative.  Although you can find pricey bags of these types of chips at most grocery stores today, the ingredient list can be questionable.  Compared to the equivalent, make-at-home fruit and veggie chips will provide your body with energizing nutrients.  Here are some recipes for chips that you can feel good about eating: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VExW4SNt3Ko
Get real energy from natural sources with these coconut almond energy bars. Forget energy drinks or energy bars sold in stores. That’s all phoney baloney parlor tricks that make your heart race a little faster so you think you have more energy. But what happens later is you crash and have even less energy than when you started. These bars are filled with almonds and other wholesome foods, taste amazing, and give you that get up and go you need during the day.
Whole eggs and egg whites help the pancakes rise and set once cooked. A little bit of ghee (browned clarified butter) helps add tenderness to the batter. Baking soda and cream of tarter work together and chemical leavening agents help the pancakes rise as soon as it hits the hot pan. Honey is added for a hint of sweetness and encourages quicker browning on the surface. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyZ95ohpKjs

Since most breakfast foods have grains, paleo eaters can sometimes have a hard time finding filling options other than eggs and bacon. The Paleolithic Diet, an increasingly popular lifestyle choice, is based on consuming only foods available to the first humans who lived over 200,000 years ago. Meaning: Plants and animal meats are in and grain and dairy products are out.


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I just can across your Instagram and blog for the first time and am loving all your recipes! Our pancake recipes are really similar which made me smile ☺ – I use one less banana, one less egg and add two tablespoons of coconut flour. I’m going to have to try yours and see how they compare ;). Thanks so much for posting all of this! I’m really looking forward to trying out a bunch of your recipes!

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These are sirloin rolls have brussel sprouts and fennel as sidekicks, but the sirloin is going to get top billing as the star of the show. Making sirloin rolls can be tricky unless you know how to do it, and they’ve provided helpful instructions here so yours will come out looking just like theirs. They have bacon rolled up with the sirloin, so you’re going to get plenty of flavor, and it’s nice that they have matched all of this meat with Brussels sprouts, one of the healthiest vegetables around. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IRx9zlEMOk
These snack bars will definitely cure you of any food cravings, which makes them great as an emergency backup while you’re on the Paleo plan. Paleo is definitely not about starving yourself, or torturing yourself by depriving yourself of enjoyable foods, and these bars are proof of that. Imagine having a supply of these at the ready for times when you’re hungry but your next meal won’t be for a few hours. You’d be able to quell any signs of hunger which can often lead to diet-ruining food choices. However, as long as you’re eating balanced Paleo meals in the proper portions you shouldn’t be getting hungry until several hours after you’ve eaten.

These are terrific — and a great Passover recipe, too! I sometimes add a quarter cup of coconut flour, too, which seems to help give them a more pancake-like texture. When cooking, remember that these don’t bubble and dry at the edges like regular pancakes do, so you have to flip them based on time. Keep them small-ish, too. I do about 3-4 inches rather than 6, and they flip fine.
Heat a griddle or cast iron skillet (or any other nonstick surface on which you like to make pancakes) over medium heat. Lightly grease your griddle surface with additional coconut oil. Pour the pancake batter about 1/4 cup at a time into rounds. Allow to cook until the edges of the pancakes are set (when they’re set, they’ll lose their shine), about 1 minute. With a wide, thin spatula, turn each pancake over and allow to finish cooking on the other side (about another 30 seconds). Remove the pancakes from the griddle, and repeat with the remaining batter.
Sometimes I just don’t want the banana flavor either. So I decided that processing other fresh fruits/vegetables to the consistency of applesauce would give me some variety. The mildest I have tried so far are apples and zucchini. The eggs really provide the structure, so if it’s a little juicy, like pineapple, you may want just a bit more egg than fruit, and a good hot pan to keep them from spreading too much. However, I have also realized (accidentally the first time) that I can make a thinnish one the size of my skillet, flip it, and have a nice wrap too. Just don’t cook it too dry or it splits like egg when you bend it. Extra coconut oil/butter in the mix helps that a little. Made with pureed homemade salsa, it’s fantastic with some seasoned ground beef, lettuce, tomato, sour cream. Made with pureed zucchini, the most versatile savory (spice it up!) one, I think, that is particularly good with mediterranean-spiced lamb and some garlic and cucumber in sour cream (I miss my shawarma). I’m still working with the ratios to get a wrap that consistently doesn’t break, so I can eat it like a tortilla/flatbread, but I usually end up eating it with a fork any way. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuh1u9cxx0U

If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyiCfNSG1_A
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