When I first developed this recipe for Paleo pancakes, I used a tiny bit of coconut flour rather than tapioca starch/flour for structure. The batter was thicker, especially as it sat out, as coconut flour has that tendency, and it was almost impossible to make smaller pancakes. By replacing the coconut flour with a Paleo-friendly starch, the pancakes still have structure but the batter is more flexible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-i2oZWK2pM
Nina, how much cinnamon do you use for your pancakes? I have tried banana pancakes, with just 2 eggs, a banana and then some cinnamon and vanilla, but….I find seems like the banana tends to overpower things a bit, not sure if I’m not used to or not or if using an organic one would make a difference, but it’s a little bit of an adjustment. Any tips there? A binder may not be a bad idea either……

Pork rinds usually get the reputation of being the ultimate form of junk food, but you have to remember that most junk food is junk because it is deep fried in unhealthy oils, and made up of ingredients that act as filler rather than anything that is natural. Here they’re using real pork and frying it up in coconut oil so you’re getting a healthy version of this notorious snack. They even show you how to throw together your own Cajun seasoning so you can make that whenever you’re in the mood of Cajun spiciness.
Hey Amanda, I’d love to try this as well. I’m not sure if they will freeze well, but I don’t see why not. I think freezing the chicken salad would be smarter, and taking that out on a Sunday and just packing those up for the week and storing in the fridge may be better. The wraps probably don’t freeze well. But for most of my once a month cooking, it always requires a bit of assembling the week of! Does that make sense?
These chips are made from parsnips, and most new Paleo followers will probably have a very limited experience with the parsnip. It does find its way into a lot of Paleo cooking because it can be used in many different ways. Don’t knock it till you try it, because they tend to take on the surrounding flavors, in this case yummy maple syrup and coconut oil. So while you may have ignored parsnips a thousand times before, maybe it’s time to give them a chance. You may end up liking them, especially since you can’t go wrong when they’re baked in fat and sugar. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwrHWuqiL1g

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This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fi7YlHwBoBQ
When I first developed this recipe for Paleo pancakes, I used a tiny bit of coconut flour rather than tapioca starch/flour for structure. The batter was thicker, especially as it sat out, as coconut flour has that tendency, and it was almost impossible to make smaller pancakes. By replacing the coconut flour with a Paleo-friendly starch, the pancakes still have structure but the batter is more flexible.
These mini pizzas are great to have as a snack, at a party, for watching the big game, as a lunch, or a dinner, depending on how many of them you eat at one time. They are made with a crust that is formed with almond flour, so they’re Paleo friendly, and they are topped simply with tomato paste and some blue cheese, so you get the rich and tangy taste of blue cheese in each bite. You’ll want to go with a goat’s milk variety of blue cheese, if you go this route at all. Some Paleo eaters can handle small amounts of cheese on occasion.
These are the best gluten free pancakes I’ve ever had… and maybe the best pancakes ever, period! They are so good! I added an overripe banana and decreased the coconut milk a tad to keep the consistency right. I topped them with whipped coconut cream and fresh strawberries. OMG. I want to eat them every day from now on. THANK YOU! I wish there was a way to post a picture, because they actually turned out beautifully browned and round, too, which is hard to come by in most grain free pancakes in my experience! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRCgH9ZQj2o

This could be the perfect trail mix. It’s full of crunch from a variety of nuts, sweetness from coconut flakes and banana chips and just the right amount of chocolate to curb those cravings. It comes together right in the slow cooker, so your kitchen will smell amazing! Be sure to use coconut oil or ghee instead of butter here to keep it strictly Paleo. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrcSUhdBgtc

This post may contain some links that are affiliate links, though products are ones I use personally and recommend. When you purchase anything using my links, it costs you absolutely nothing extra, but it does give Paleobailey.com a little financial support which helps to keep this blog running. Thank you for your continued support, both with your dollars and your interest. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip69hOWsSls
Hey, great recipe and site!! FYI, The Paleo Kitchen cookbook has a mayo recipe that is SOOOO much easier…you take 3/4 cut oil of your choice, 1 egg, lemon juice(1 tsp I think), and 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard, place them in a tall, narrow container, and use an immersion blender! Start at the bottom and move the blender upward as the ingredients emulsify. I had quit making my own mayo because the other way was SO time consuming and mine never seemed to come out right, but this version is pretty fool-proof! I use grapeseed oil because the olive oil is a bit bitter for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPYBVzif3RY
Many of you have tried some version of a stuffed vegetable at your meals such as a tuna-stuffed tomato or beef-stuffed peppers, but there is no reason why you can’t incorporate similar items into your snacks as part of your Paleo plan.  By rotating various colorful varieties of vegetables into your snacks, you’ll  be fueling your body with loads of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants.  Stuffed vegetables can be made into gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free snack options with a little creativity and advance preparation.  Definitely not taste-free, glance over some of the recipes listed below and see which one sounds like it might be a tasty addition to your snack rotation:

If you’re craving pasta, veggie noodles, also known as zoodles, will be your fix. Veggie noodles are basically just vegetables, most often zucchini, squash, and sweet potato, that are cut or spiraled to create a noodle-like texture and shape. Since Paleo is such a big health movement right now, veggie noodles can be found at most supermarkets, but Whole Foods has pre-spiraled and prepackaged options that make for a quick low-stress meal. Vegetables are a main staple in the Paleo diet and for good reason. They are full of vitamins and leave you feeling satisfied.
If light and fluffy is what you’re after, coconut flour is what you need. With only a hint of coconut flavor, these Paleo pancakes are the perfect transition into the gluten-free pancake life. To cut back on sugar, use vanilla extract or honey in place of the granulated sugar. And make sure to make them extra small—this way, flipping them won’t make you flip out.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
This could be the perfect trail mix. It’s full of crunch from a variety of nuts, sweetness from coconut flakes and banana chips and just the right amount of chocolate to curb those cravings. It comes together right in the slow cooker, so your kitchen will smell amazing! Be sure to use coconut oil or ghee instead of butter here to keep it strictly Paleo. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrjjJnfLxC0
For a heartier cake, it’s best to mix a few different flours. This recipe uses almond, coconut, and tapioca flour, and also insists that eggs be at room temperature so the ingredients bind easily and cook perfectly (i.e. not too fast, which can cause them to burn). Berries can be a little tricky in this lightened-up batter, so we say skip 'em and stick to the compote. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAR9kTenQyE
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