Perfect pancakes should be fluffy, tender, lightly sweet, and simple to make. For a paleo recipe that would stand up to its traditional counterparts, we started by choosing the flours that would be the base of our recipe. We knew from previous testing that a combination of almond and arrowroot flours would give our pancakes volume and structure; we determined that a 5:1 ratio of almond to arrowroot worked best. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TXEys0wR-E

Here’s an interesting take on hummus, which is necessary because traditional hummus is not something you can have on Paleo. They’ve replaced the garbanzo beans (aka chickpeas) with a combination of zucchini and avocado, and the result is something that looks a lot like hummus, and tastes really good too. All of the other ingredients in hummus are present, like garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and cumin, so as long as you’re not a hummus snob you should be pleasantly surprised by this concoction.


Ideally, if you have a good Paleo breakfast and lunch, you’ll often find you don’t feel hungry and don’t need to snack. If you do find yourself hungry between meals, try eating more at meals (are you consuming enough satiating fat in your meals?). Also, check out the recipe book I've just written with loads of Paleo Breakfast recipes to inspire you.

Brownies usually require mixing up the batter, baking it, then letting them cool just long enough so you can take a bite. But these brownie bites require no baking, so it’s just a matter of mixing up the batter, rolling it into a ball, and digging in. The nice part about these are that you can store them in the fridge and they keep really well, so they can be a nice sweet after dinner treat for a few days, even up to a week. You won’t believe the taste and the fact that there’s only a handful of ingredients is just a bonus.


Before starting on your journey to Paleo, perhaps it was common for you to run to the store and grab a box of highly processed, expensive gluten-free crackers thinking gluten-free must equal health.  Now that you know that gluten-free does not always equal healthy, you may feel a bit stumped as to how to incorporate crackers into your diet.  The good news is that making your own gluten-free, grain-free crackers can be a rather easy process.  Most Paleo cracker recipes have very few ingredients and require very little time to prepare.  If you have never been much of a cracker fan, however, replace the cracker recipe ideas listed with some of your favorite finger veggies and enjoy them with some of the Paleo-friendly dips suggested below:
Tacos can be tricky to make Paleo, but they’ve figured out a good way here by using portobello mushroom caps for the shells. These caps do a good job of holding all of the yummy taco-inspired ingredients, and by the time you finish one of these you’ll feel satisfied, and like you just had Taco Night. The thick texture of the mushrooms means you can pile on the taco toppings and you won’t have to worry about breaking the shell. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyiH1xtmN_w
These veggie roll ups are great to make ahead of time, and it’s a good idea to plan snacks into your day, rather than waiting until you get hungry and then frantically making something. Cucumber acts as the roll, and a tomato is the prize inside. Cashews act as a nice filling to help hold it all together, once they get blended up into a sort of paste. Olive oil, garlic, sea salt and basil are all Paleo goodies, so you can feel totally fine by having this as a snack anytime you get hungry and it’s not time for a full meal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQHKYa_Zsvw
Healthy granola is hard to find because most supermarket options are loaded with sugars and unnatural additives, not to mention grains and oats that make them Paleo-unfriendly. Unlike your typical granola, Purely Elizabeth is grain- and oat-free, plus it’s low-sugar. The low-carb granola clusters are perfect for the Paleo diet because they’re high in protein, thanks to cashews, dried coconut flakes, seeds, and cashew butter. The grain-free granola comes in two different flavors—banana nut butter and coconut cashew.

Absolutely amazing! I love your recipes and this one will definitely be a staple for a family weekend breakfast. I have made this recipe using tapioca flour and today, with arrowroot flower. My preference is arrowroot flower. Tapioca flour has it’s place in some recipes but it can lead to a gummy texture, mainly in the middle of whatever it is I’m making. Arrowroot flour made these taste just like the real thing. My husband, who would put extra gluten on food (his running joke) was convinced these were the real thing. I think I’ll start using arrowroot flour for all of my recipes that call for tapioca. Ashley, do they always interchange so well? Thank you for your amazing recipes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o

×