Don’t let the green color fool you, these also taste good in addition to being good for you. They contain pistachios, pumpkin seeds, coconut, orange juice, and help seeds, so you know you’re getting plenty of flavor along with the nutritional features of each of these items. The green color comes from the use of spirulina, which adds even more nutrients to the mix. These are raw, so they require no baking which means you mush all of the ingredients together into bar form, let them chill, and they’re ready to eat.
These are terrific — and a great Passover recipe, too! I sometimes add a quarter cup of coconut flour, too, which seems to help give them a more pancake-like texture. When cooking, remember that these don’t bubble and dry at the edges like regular pancakes do, so you have to flip them based on time. Keep them small-ish, too. I do about 3-4 inches rather than 6, and they flip fine.
Calamari is definitely something our ancestors would have eaten if they lived near a shore. Knowing how to catch fish and other sea creatures is what helped us beat out the Neanderthals, so we’ve known a thing or two about seafood for a long time now. This recipe walks you through the steps needed to take calamari and turn it into a delicious salad that works as a starter to a meal, or as a light meal all by itself. If you’re not used to eating things like squid you may have to broaden your palate and try new foods. It’s what Paleo is all about.
The blender turned out to be the simple solution: We processed all of the liquid ingredients until the mixture was frothy, then added the dry ingredients and processed the batter for a minute longer. Mixing everything in the blender had multiple benefits: It streamlined the recipe, incorporated air into the batter to make fluffier pancakes, and ensured that the batter was perfectly smooth and pourable. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PitZcopXOA

This recipe is a little nutty—literally. It uses almond flour as its main dry ingredient and is mixed with almond milk too. If the batter is watery at first, simply add more flour, and feel free to change things up and use hazelnut flour instead. These Paleo pancakes are on the heartier side, especially if you add some tapioca powder, which will help avoid any breakage.

This recipe does its best to replicate the chocolate Hostess brand donuts, but in a way that gets rid of the lousy ingredients and replaces them with wholesome ones. They contain wonderful things like medjool dates, eggs, and coconut flour, rather than what you’ll find in a package of Hostess donettes. The main ingredient in those is sugar, followed by partially hydrogenated vegetable oil which provides trans fat, and wheat flour. Not a good snack to get into the habit of eating, but these replicas won’t set you back. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0CG_84_7s8
I realize that this is the silliest question and maybe it relates to the mushy question someone else had. I tried making these about a month ago and had an awful hard time flipping them without them either sticking to the turner or them breaking all apart on me. How can I get them to turn like those inflammatory pancakes that people make (very easy)?
This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNh6I_buzAo

Absolutely amazing! I love your recipes and this one will definitely be a staple for a family weekend breakfast. I have made this recipe using tapioca flour and today, with arrowroot flower. My preference is arrowroot flower. Tapioca flour has it’s place in some recipes but it can lead to a gummy texture, mainly in the middle of whatever it is I’m making. Arrowroot flour made these taste just like the real thing. My husband, who would put extra gluten on food (his running joke) was convinced these were the real thing. I think I’ll start using arrowroot flour for all of my recipes that call for tapioca. Ashley, do they always interchange so well? Thank you for your amazing recipes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
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