Remove the meat from the marinade and lay it out on your counter on top of some paper towels. The goal is to get it as dry as possible. Lay paper towel over top and pat it dry. Now’s the time to put it into your dehydrator or oven. You can thread the meat onto wooden skewers (near one end of each piece) and lay the skewers perpendicular to the oven wrack’s bars (use the top shelf). Make sure the meat hangs down. Place cooking sheets lined in foil beneath the meat to catch any drips.

Many of you have tried some version of a stuffed vegetable at your meals such as a tuna-stuffed tomato or beef-stuffed peppers, but there is no reason why you can’t incorporate similar items into your snacks as part of your Paleo plan.  By rotating various colorful varieties of vegetables into your snacks, you’ll  be fueling your body with loads of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants.  Stuffed vegetables can be made into gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free snack options with a little creativity and advance preparation.  Definitely not taste-free, glance over some of the recipes listed below and see which one sounds like it might be a tasty addition to your snack rotation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTU353BN-wM


These make a great snack because they have a lot going on. There’s sweet potato in them, so you’ve got fiber built into them. They’ve also cut out all grain, using almond meal and coconut flour instead. The sweetness comes from honey, not from the coconut because the coconut is unsweetened. These aren’t sweet enough to be considered a dessert, and they’re billed as supplying energy thanks to the sweet potato they contain. Sweet potato is great as a snack because it is digested slowly and releases energy over a longer time period. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWy3u38J3aw

Absolutely amazing! I love your recipes and this one will definitely be a staple for a family weekend breakfast. I have made this recipe using tapioca flour and today, with arrowroot flower. My preference is arrowroot flower. Tapioca flour has it’s place in some recipes but it can lead to a gummy texture, mainly in the middle of whatever it is I’m making. Arrowroot flour made these taste just like the real thing. My husband, who would put extra gluten on food (his running joke) was convinced these were the real thing. I think I’ll start using arrowroot flour for all of my recipes that call for tapioca. Ashley, do they always interchange so well? Thank you for your amazing recipes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
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