Hi Elana…….I love this paleo bread recipe and I’ve made it several times, mostly it is always wet in the middle……..I do the recipe exactly as written…….I was wondering if someone with a perfect loaf could take the internal temperature of the bread after removing from oven. I took the temperature of mine yesterday and it registered 140 degrees and that’s not enough…….although toothpicks came out dry. I cooked it 35 minutes………should I leave it in for 40 minutes?.. I would love to know the internal temperature for doneness……….I think knowing that would eliminate the wet middle.
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.

I am BLOWN away by this bread! I added up the protein and net carbs … umm … WOW. A huge bonus is that both kids – one of whom is crazy picky – AND my husband both love it!!!! They devoured the first loaf within a few hours. This will obviously be a huge staple in our house. It’s really a God-send. Our son, who is the picky eater, is mostly picky about proteins. He won’t eat any meat except for chicken, no eggs or dairy. We’ve gone gluten/casein free to see if it helps with his autism and as much as I totally wanted to eliminate bread, I finally just had to accept that he HAD to eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich at lunch. My cracker/veggie/peanut butter dip thing just wasn’t working. Not only will he EAT this bread – he wouldn’t eat the other gluten-free breads I was making – it is actually giving him the ONE thing he needs most – PROTEIN. Seriously, thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOGwEnwlDF4


How many eggs did you use when you increased it by 50%? I had a mini loaf pan that was 3 1/2″ by 6″ It came put great but when I got to the center of the loaf I did find a small spot that was still raw dough. Not enough to ruin the loaf though. I used a combination of Bob’s Red Mill almond flour and King Arthur almond flour. Anxious to try it in a full sized loaf pan though if I can figure out how many eggs to use.
I just made this today, and my husband, toddler, and I all loved it! We used ours for cheese and tomato sandwiches, and my husband managed to eat about half of the loaf before it even cooled. Like another person mentioned, I had to bake mine longer, but for me it was nearly twice as long (I’m at a relatively high altitude, maybe that’s why?). As yet another person said, it will now be a staple in our home too!
And also I wanted to share that as far as converting measurements to grams…if you look on the bag it will tell you the conversion. For example, my almond flour is 1/4 cup = 28g. This is much more accurate than using a generic conversion chart. Had I used the one listed above in the comments I would have nearly doubled the amount of almond flour. This bread is sadly expensive for me to make…worth it, but expensive. I will be able to get two loaves from one $10 bag of almond flour. Counting eggs and all other ingredients, that’s pricey for 12 slices of bread. However, you get what you pay for, you know? Nutritious food isn’t always cheap, but for your body it should be necessary. I’m learning this as I go. Again, I appreciate this recipe so much! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3L3Q1GuDkE

I’ve only made this once, but it sounds like my experience is common…once it cools, this loaf is about 4 inches tall…too small to really be sandwich bread, unless you erase conventional bread slicing. Start by making a “normal” vertical cut half way down the loaf so you have 2 mini loaves. Now slice horizontally to make your slices. Still won’t be particularly big, but big enough to get the job done. And I’ve found the bread to be resilient enough to get 5 horizontal slices (per mini loaf) like this, for a total of five 2-slice sandwiches. Your slices will be very thin, but toughen them up in the toaster and call it a day.


While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok4_JpAIG4w
The Hiwi are not particularly healthy. Compared to the Ache, a hunter–gatherer tribe in Paraguay, the Hiwi are shorter, thinner, more lethargic and less well nourished. Hiwi men and women of all ages constantly complain of hunger. Many Hiwi are heavily infected with parasitic hookworms, which burrow into the small intestine and feed on blood. And only 50 percent of Hiwi children survive beyond the age of 15.
This bread, I guess you could say, has more of a “cake-y” texture than a real “bread-y” feel to it: it’s really soft and moist, kind of like a heavy pound cake, perhaps, but one that would be savory. Not an unpleasant texture at all, if you ask me, and it’s so crazy tasty and more-ish, you soon get to thinking that you’d much rather be eating this than any old piece of traditional bread.
They go through a virtual checklist on what makes a bread a bread, and it’s pretty much right on. You want your bread to be able to toast up in the toaster, to have a crust on the outside but be soft on the inside, and to slice up without giving you too many problems. The reason this becomes important to consider is because many breads that try to cut out wheat and up falling short of many of these requirements. But this bread is up to the challenge and can be that go-to bread recipe you’ll need while going with the Paleo lifestyle.
Hi, LOVE this bread!! So do my kids :) I have a problem though with the bread sticking in places to the bottom, so I tend to lose some of it..(handy quick desert though) Any suggestions as to how to keep the loaf intact? I have been using lard to liberally grease the bottom, Its still sticking. I have been waiting about 15 minutes before trying to remove it….should it be cold? Thanks A bunch!!
This raisin bread will have you wondering if it really is Paleo, or if you’ve just cheated on your diet program. But no worries, everything checks out and you can eat this in moderation just like anything else dubbed acceptable. With ingredients like sweet potatoes, coconut flour, eggs, butter, and raisins, how can you go wrong? She’s managed to exclude all of the things that give the body a hard time in regards to digesting and processing, and replaced them with items that are known to be easy to digest and absorb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIR_wKNQIYs
Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qMoIguD8qs
Begin by making your filling, this has a jam consistency. In a medium saucepan, combine raspberries, honey, lemon juice and lemon zest. Heat to a medium to medium high heat, until mixture begins to bubble. Let bubble for 1-2 minutes, then lower heat to a simmer. While simmering, be sure to mash the berries with a wooden spoon. Cook for an additional 2-3 minutes, remove from heat. Add in chia seeds. Let cool for 5-10 minutes before transferring to a glass jar or dish, and place in the fridge to cool completely. This will take about 1 hour, but you can also make the filling and let sit overnight. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCXMw7xyKao
Once they’re good to go, the process of making these paleo breads couldn’t be easier. It goes like this. Throw a bunch of ingredients in a food processor, and hit the “on” button to mix up the batter. Then, transfer it to a pan and bake it. The biggest challenge I have making these is to get the oven to heat as quickly as I can get the bread batter ready for it.
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
I am so looking for breads that work……….this does not……I have your books………..but the question about the ammonia…….they are an in your face issue…………for me, not till I sliced the loaf……but my nose is very sensitive….and I taste the amonia without ingesting the product…………my Mum, who has no sense of smell left, loved it…….. time to keep trying…………I am borderline diabetic, mum is, and my lover is in denial……………..so looking for something that passes as ‘bread’…………..thanks for the help………….luckylin………. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upEoaM5u34Q
I’ve used mini bread pans and small springform pans, square cake pans, clay loaf pans, USA pans, and I recently tried an extra-long loaf pan, equivalent of 2 loaves in 1 pan. I’ve substituted other nut flours (pistachio, hazelnut), other oils (olive, almond, hazelnut, butter) other liquids, including buttermilk, my current favorite, added seasoning ingredients, such as olives, sun-dried tomatoes, fresh and dried herbs and seasonings, tried it with caraway, dill, and a little tamarind powder for a “rye” flavor. Topped it with pine nuts or sesame seeds And of course we’ve enjoyed it many times over just as the recipe is written.
Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1EwdriXhpc

One flour you’ll definitely want to familiarize yourself with on Paleo is almond flour. It comes in handy in dozens of different baking applications and it provides a pretty darn good substitute to general purpose flour. This almond loaf was made using almond flour and a few select additional ingredients like coconut oil and apple cider vinegar. This recipe is good for showing you how easy it is to come up with a loaf of Paleo bread. It isn’t exactly rocket science so don’t be afraid to try it out if you’ve never made bread from scratch before.
Have to laugh with me — I mixed it all up in my cuisinart, popped it in the perfect sized, non stick bread pan and put it in the oven for 5 minutes before I realized I’d forgotten the Apple Cider Vinegar! (Which helps the baking soda do its work, right?) I grabbed it out, poured the vinegar on top and stirred it up and shoved it back in. It came out fine, believe it or not! I’m having earth balance margarine on it, with some honey, Yum.

Hi, I’ve made this recipe twice and LOVE the taste. However, both times the bread would rise so high in the oven, but as soon as I take it out to cool it deflated and middle sink down. What could’ve gone wrong? Over mixing? I did switch coconut flour to all almond flour instead. Could that be a problem? Please help as I’m anxious to make another batch. Thank you.
I don’t have dietary issues and do not adhere to a strict paleo diet. I do, however, have a raging sweet tooth that I try to keep in check by eating a low glycemic diet day to day, and limit high glycemic foods to those times when I am deliberately treating myself to “sweets”. This bread is more the texture of “quick bread” (like banana, or zucchini), which was a surprise. Its very tasty and satisfying, almost rich. This bread will be a good delivery system for peanut butter and bananas or soft boiled eggs.
Slight changes I had to make: pumpkin puree in place of the applesauce (1:1), a whoopie pie pan in place of the ring molds, and I baked for 12 minutes instead of 15. The pan yielded 8 “rolls” which I sliced *very* thinly to make some jam and nut butter sandwiches. Delicious! Thanks so much for the recipe! (I found this recipe via Pinterest, by the way.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlAiM0E68Oc
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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