The paleo diet runs on the same foods our hunter-gather ancestors supposedly ate: fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, and nuts. "By following these nutritional guidelines, we put our diet more in line with the evolutionary pressures that shaped our current genetics, which in turn positively influences health and well being," says Loren Cordain, PhD, professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University and author of The Paleo Diet. He says the diet lessens the body's glycemic load, has a healthy ratio of saturated-to-unsaturated fatty acids, increases vitamin and nutrient consumption, and contains an optimal balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
Hi Synaca, thanks for your feedback! I don’t think your bread sunk in the middle because you substituted tapioca. This was probably from the almond flour you used that may have been more coarsely ground. If the particles in the flour are larger, the ingredients won’t bind properly. Try sifting the flour before you measure the amount you need to remove those larger chunks. Another thing to consider is the temperature in your oven. Do you have an oven thermometer? Please let me know when you make it again and how it turns out.

Hi everyone, I made this for the first time having started the paleo walk. I come from New Zealand and some of our food terms are very different. For instance in the USA your biscuit …is a cookie here, and what we call a scone is your biscuit . You are probably wondering where is this woman going with this… Well!.. I made this bread recipe yesterday it was absolutely delicious .. However it’s texture is more like a loaf not a sandwich bread. When I say a loaf, I mean something similar to a date loaf or a type of banana cake but made in a loaf tin. I just thought to share my cultural experience with the rest of the world.


The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqA3yHdSeSM
I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!
The last thing I can think of is the brand of almond flour you’re using and how you’re measuring your ingredients. Not all brands of almond flour are good for baking. Some are coarser and more oily then others, and this can affect the texture of baked goods. I always recommend people to use the same ingredients as I list below the recipes so that there’s no fail. If you can’t find the brands of almond flour I recommend, maybe you can order it online. My favorite brands are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts.com. Honeyville is now sold at Costco. Let me know if this helps.
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4j4JsvIvaQ

Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.
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WOW! WOW! WOW! Did I say Wow! This is exactly what I have been looking for, a low carb bread as I am a diabetic. I did not know that arrowroot is a carb but I calculated that 1/2c. equals 72 g. of carbohydrates roughly. So not too bad. I have enjoyed every recipe I have tried so far. I can’t tell you how happy I am that I accidentally discovered your website. Keep up the good work!! I just can’t stop making everything I see. ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpygmaabb9E
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KQgyfPixmw
Made this for the first time and after reading all the reviews about dense and not rising, decided to separate egg whites and yolks and whisk first the whites and then the yolks to increase volume, as one would for a sponge cake. Must confess to adding a pinch of cream of tartar to the whites, ( this is one of the ingredients in baking powder so shouldn’t upset the purists). I also only had almond meal ( trader joes) unblanched, and substituted fresh lime juice for the vinegar and used 1tbsp olive oil, didn’t have coconut oil. Once all three bowls were mixed thoroughly (1.whites, 2.yolks plus honey, oil and lime juice, and 3. dry ingredients whizzed tog. In processor,) gently fold all together, yolk mix into whites, then dry mix into egg mix . Put into oiled loaf pan and bake as directed……….it turned out just perfect and delicious……..looks like the picture only much darker because of the almond meal…..more like a whole wheat loaf would look…I am so pleased, the added step is worth the trouble, it rose to the top of the pan and very light and easy to slice.
Christina, I haven’t tried with cassava flour in this recipe, and it’s actually one flour I haven’t worked much with, so I’m not sure if it would yield a similar result without making other adjustments to the recipe (for example, certain flours absorb liquid differently). If you decide to experiment with the recipe using cassava flour, please let me know how it turns out!
Hi Elana…….I love this paleo bread recipe and I’ve made it several times, mostly it is always wet in the middle……..I do the recipe exactly as written…….I was wondering if someone with a perfect loaf could take the internal temperature of the bread after removing from oven. I took the temperature of mine yesterday and it registered 140 degrees and that’s not enough…….although toothpicks came out dry. I cooked it 35 minutes………should I leave it in for 40 minutes?.. I would love to know the internal temperature for doneness……….I think knowing that would eliminate the wet middle.
Was very excited to try this recipe (amended version) because it did not call for rice flour and because it was GF and Paleo. However, after spending the $15.00 + $11.00(s/h) for the pan, and the cost of the ingredients, I am very disappointed. Bread looked good and spelled good until cutting it and found that the center was raw, gooey, and smelled bad. Had to throw it all away.
I am so looking for breads that work……….this does not……I have your books………..but the question about the ammonia…….they are an in your face issue…………for me, not till I sliced the loaf……but my nose is very sensitive….and I taste the amonia without ingesting the product…………my Mum, who has no sense of smell left, loved it…….. time to keep trying…………I am borderline diabetic, mum is, and my lover is in denial……………..so looking for something that passes as ‘bread’…………..thanks for the help………….luckylin……….
Hi Sonda, glad you like it! I use a free nutrition calculator on the website sparkrecipes.com, which generates the nutrition table. You just put in all your ingredients and number of portions and it does the rest of the work for you. I cannot guarantee whatever comes out is 100% accurate, it is thought to be a guide. If you need to rely on nutrition info for health reasons, you’d have to make your own calculations.

this bread is fabulous! i made it in a larger bread pan, making the loaf a bit short. . . Next time, i’ll use a pyrex bread pan (smaller) so that the loaf is a bit taller. Wondering if i could make 1.5 of the recipe for a taller loaf in my bigger pan. . . so many things to try. Oh and my kids loved it! They thought it was banana bread even though it isn’t really sweet, i think the texture gave them that impression. I am thinking i could use this as a base for a yummy banana bread, adding a banana or two. I’ll let you know if i try that.


I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtEubaJ30n0
Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing.

Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!
Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.
umm, hard to say what may have caused this to happen. A few things I can think of are the temperature in your oven, the other ingredients you used, and the way you measured them. It’s so hard to say. I’ve made this bread with Welbee’s so it’s not that. Are you using measuring spoons and cups? I think you should try again. If you can purchase an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it during baking I would do that. Every oven is so different… Here’s one for $6.51 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1WcJ1tv. Also, when you use test your bread with the stick, be sure to insert it all the way in, and in a couple different places. Please let me know how it goes when you make it again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrlFu0Lsqbc
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