The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUNe5SEqDw8

Wow !! This is my third try at Paleo bread recipe and definitely the best.I substituted one table spoon chia seeds(made it into a slurry first) for one egg as I was afraid the bread would be too eggy and my husband wouldn’t like it.It’s cooling on the counter and I just had to take a slice because it looks so perfect….delish !!Thanks so much for sharing this recipe.I’ll be enjoying bread regularly now.

Sounds great. I just wondered if I chose to use just coconut flour and not almond, how much more coconut flour would I use than the original recipe calls for? I know that coconut flour soaks up much more liquid than almond floud so not sure if I would also need to add more liquid and if so what and how much? I’m new to paleo and not much of a cook but I’m trying to change that, esp with this new lifestyle change I’m trying to make. The Paleo bread I can get in stores is just too expensive, so I’m trying to do this on my own to save money. Also I need something like this to use with almond butter as a post-workout snack after hitting the gym. Options for portable protein are really limited, so that would work the best.


Of course Wikipedia has a page on the Paleolithic Diet. It is quite thorough. It also isn't clear about the lean/fatty meat debate between the followers of Loren Cordain and a slew of others, and pushes lean meat. It is weak on the variations of the diet. Then it restricts fermented beverages. Even butterflies eat fermented fruit. Why wouldn't our paleo ancestors also?
Another 2014 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the effects of the Paleo plan to those of a standard low-fat diet on 70 obese, postmenopausal women. After six months, the Paleo group lost 14 pounds on average, while the other group lost nearly 6 pounds. After a year, the Paleo group had lost 19 pounds on average, and the low-fat dieters had dropped 10 pounds. A year later, both groups had regained some weight: The Paleo group was still down 10 pounds, while the low-fat group had dropped an average of more than 6 pounds.
These cookies are not only absolutely adorable, but with spicy seasonings like cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger, they also scream, “It’s holiday season!” (Note: We fully support making these year-round while singing carols at the top of your lungs.) And don’t stress if you don’t have cookie cutters to make gingerbread people; just drop spoonfuls on the tray and bake.
hi Adriana! I tried this recipe but tweaked it a bit since I don’t have arrowroot flour. I used rice flour for the meantime cause it’s the only one I have here. Since I also have only one egg available, I reduced the other ingredients to 1/4 of the original. The recipe yielded one mini loaf bread. Tasty and tender texture like regular flour bread with a little gritty texture cause I just ground slivered almond in a seed grinder. But still loved the outcome. and it smells fantastic during baking. I posted the image in my instagram at http://instagram.com/karenieavila. Thank you for sharing your recipes to the world.:-)
This is my second time making this bread! First time I didn’t use golden flaxseed meal so the color was little darker ( and I didn’t like the one I got from Trader Joe’s ) . Second time I used Bob’s golden flaxseed meal and color and flavor was much better!!! But both time it didn’t rise like your bread. My yeast was nice and bubbly. Only thing I can think of is my Psyllium Husk was whole not power. Does that make a difference? I did grind it up but it wasn’t powder like. Another thing I read in the other comments was the kitchen not being warm enough. I don’t think my kitchen wasn’t warm enough so next time I’ll try it on top of my oven!
I accidentally forgot mine when my “timer” didn’t remind me. I remembered it and pulled it out after it had been in the oven an extra 13 minutes. It was almost perfect. I also just whisked vigorously as my processor is missing since the last move. I will definitely make it again, but I will likely play with it a bit as I am hoping to find a few versions to make regularly to replace my family’s usual bread. Even our most finicky eater is loving these recipes so far. Thank you!
This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
This bread does have quite a few ingredients, but you’ll find that most are staple paleo and keto pantry ingredients. In the list below you’ll find details on several ingredients and possible subs. But if possible, please do try and make this recipe without any subs. As out of the 18 permutations we tried, this one really was terrific and the absolute best.
I completely omitted the palm shortening and didn’t replace it with anything – I can’t tell that anything’s missing. I also doubled the recipe and put it all in one loaf pan like some others did and baked it for 30 minutes. Even the hubs, who is truly a bread addict, really likes this recipe! I think they’re kind of English Muffiny and I toast the slices for sandwiches. Gluten gives me eczema and I never thought I’d get a good sandwich bread again. Thank you! 🙂
Thank you for sharing this recipe, I made them in a 8 inch square baking dish and cut into 4, which worked great! I just bought a muffin top pan today and will be using that to make a double batch this weekend! Taste and texture of these are amazing! Just what I needed for sandwiches to take to work! NOW, I’m intrigued and will be trying your other recipes! Thanks again 🙂
The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.

An Interview with Ward Nicholson now has three parts on the web. Good overview of man's diet over the past 65 million years. Long but highly recommended reading. First published in Chet Day's "Health & Beyond" newsletter. Now part of a very comprehensive Beyond Vegetarianism site. Every argument that your vegetarian friends use to avoid meat for health reasons is debunked here.
This might just be the sweetest news you receive all day: Desserts don't need to go extinct if you're following a paleo diet. Sure, the caveman-inspired meal plan eschews sugar, but these 10 inventive bloggers found creative (and delicious!) ways to make your cravings go the way of the dinosaurs. Preheat your ovens now and prepare to enjoy some tasty paleo desserts.
Whether you're living the paleo lifestyle or you're just looking for some new and fun recipes, these easy desserts are a great way to satisfy that sweet tooth. Not only are these treats considered paleo, but they're also fast, simple, and totally delicious. With chocolate recipes, be sure to pick a dark chocolate, the darker the better. And as a general guideline, stay away from granulated sugar and instead opt for natural sweetners like coconut sugar, agave, or raw honey, all of which are paleo-approved. 
Introduction         Unless you are involved in the culinary arts or the meat industry, you probably haven’t given much thought to the term, “Saint Louis Style Pork Ribs”.   Is this dish some kind of specially spiced, spare rib recipe from St. Louis, MO?  Did it originate in a colorful Saint Louis, 20th century restaurant, or maybe it was first served at a St. Louis Cardinal baseball game in the 1930s?   All three hypotheses...
I had the same effect but I used the same pan. The issue I had was the egg whites. I beat them with a mixer for 2 minutes with the cream of tartar and still couldn’t get them whipped. I’d say they were half whipped. I gave up and put them in the loan pan anyway. The bread looked the same and tasted great but it was somewhat spongy. I’m wondering if the egg whites really wouldn’t whip because I didn’t realize they had to be room temp. The bread is great but it won’t hold up for sandwiches. Any tips on egg whipping? I felt egg defeated today!
Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N80LZL2vw3A
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogf0TuIpffg
I have made the new recipe many times and it is really delicious. By mistake I used regular almond flour and the bread came out just as tasty as if I had used blanched almond flour. Also, coconut flour is not available where I live, so I substituted the same amount of unsweetened shredded coconut, and 1/4 cup oil for the coconut oil, since my friends said the bread had too much of a coconut flavor. The substitutions worked just fine and the bread was delicious!!! Maybe it would be even more delicious if I followed your recipe exactly, but even my son, who usually does not like “healthy” food, told me it was really good, and keeps helping himself to more slices everythime I make it.

Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me.


Jan Engvald has studied food and health thoroughly in the literature. In Unexpected facts on... food he shows that today's health advice (more or less unchanged for more than 30 years) is a direct cause to the increase in national diseases like coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, obesity, adult-onset diabetes, allergy, eye diseases, etc. His findings are low-carb and high-fat, close to paleo, though he allows high fat dairy.
Ok, I did mine a little different. I can’t eat the almond flour so I substituted non glutton Oat flour and I also added chia seeds. I wasn’t able to get the right sized pan, mine is the larger one, so I noticed that the bread wasn’t going to be very high, so …. I made another batch of bread, added it to the lower layer and cooked. Oh wow!! So good!! But I can’t eat it all at once. Poo! Anyway, don’t be afraid to use the bigger pan, just double the recipe.
Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhHk0A302YM
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJKiugjwKlw

LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.
Hi Jodi, I haven’t tried that, but don’t think it would work well for this recipe. First, yeast needs sugar (for it to consume – it’s not typically in the end result), so you’d need to add that. But also, just with how we are making the bread fluffy with beaten egg whites, I don’t think yeast would work. If you want to try adding yeast to a low carb bread, I would do it with this low carb bread recipe instead.
Hi Elana! Love this bread…have been making it for a couple of months now. Only one problem: I keep getting these cobwebs in the bread. It appears after a few days being kept sealed on the counter. Have you ever come across this problem? I assume if it was a problem of the bread going bad it would get mouldy…but this isn’t mould, it looks like cobwebs inside the bread. I read up on it and people say that the cobwebs are from moth eggs. Once I read that, I got rid of my original flours and purchased new items at a different store from a different brand. I made the bread right away and stored the flours in the fridge. Once again though, each bread I make..after 3-4 days, it got cobweby. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWy3u38J3aw
Evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk writes that the idea that our genetic makeup today matches that of our ancestors is misconceived, and that in debate Cordain was "taken aback" when told that 10,000 years was "plenty of time" for an evolutionary change in human digestive abilities to have taken place.[4]:114 On this basis Zuk dismisses Cordain's claim that the paleo diet is "the one and only diet that fits our genetic makeup".[4]
I love this bread! Like many others, it needed about twice as long in the oven. I also add sunflower seeds to mine (which do turn green in subsequent days but still taste delicious!). This is a fantastic bread if you want something less eggy. It’s a little crumbly, so not really a bread to make a sandwich with, but delicious with a spread, by itself, or as an open face type sandwich. I use coconut cream in mine and Earth Balance soy free ‘butter’ to make it dairy free.
Hi Melissa, Are you beating the whole eggs? It needs to be egg whites only. Whole eggs will never form peaks. Adding a little cream of tartar helps, as well as making sure you start with a very clean bowl (preferably not plastic if you’re having issues). Having the egg whites at room temperature can be a little easier, too, though I usually don’t need to. Hope this answers your question!
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5J56pHrhyEg
Jump up ^ Hall H (2014). "Food myths: what science knows (and does not know) about diet and nutrition". Skeptic. 19 (4). p. 10. Fad diets and "miracle" diet supplements promise to help us lose weight effortlessly. Different diet gurus offer a bewildering array of diets that promise to keep us healthy and make us live longer: vegan, Paleo, Mediterranean, low fat, low carb, raw food, gluten-free ... the list goes on. (subscription required)

Hi, LOVE this bread!! So do my kids :) I have a problem though with the bread sticking in places to the bottom, so I tend to lose some of it..(handy quick desert though) Any suggestions as to how to keep the loaf intact? I have been using lard to liberally grease the bottom, Its still sticking. I have been waiting about 15 minutes before trying to remove it….should it be cold? Thanks A bunch!!


I made this bread tonight and it did not rise well but the taste was great. My yeast did proof well so I know that was not the problem. I did accidentally omit the cream of tarter but will try again with that ingredient. After reading many of the comments I think I should have let the bread proof more. It did not rise much after 50 minutes but I needed to get it baked before bedtime so did not let it proof any longer. I also wonder if it was warm enough in the location I placed it. Next time I’ll be sure to let it proof longer and find a warmer place. I do have a question about separating the liquids. Wondering if beating the egg whites to stiff peaks with the cream of tarter then folding them in last if that would help with the rising. Just worry dough would be very stiff and incorporating the beaten egg whites would be hard.
I am trying this recipe for the very first time. It’s in the oven as I type! I am only 30 hours into a Paleo diet shift, and I am so happy to find a paleo bread recipe. I like eating extra virgin olive oil with bread to get more healthy fat into my diet, and this recipe will allow me to do just that. I am pursuing a paleo – possibly keto – diet for health reasons that also include a diagnosis of MS.

I’ve tried a few other paleo/grain free breads and this is by far the best. It tastes great but what’s amazing about this recipe is ITS SO EASY. Being able to throw all the ingredients in a mixer and not having to fuss with whipping and folding in egg whites, etc is a perk. I made two modifications and it turned out well. Slightly melted raw honey in place of maple syrup and I doubled the recipe because I like the loaf to be close to a standard size (obviously adds a quite longer bake time but worth it).
Finally, here’s a couple of tips for making my paleo bread recipes. Use the recommended ingredients, i.e., when the recipe calls for almond flour, don’t use almond meal, as it won’t work in the recipe and the results will be poor. In addition, use the recommended brands of ingredients. You can find those be clicking on the green text in the ingredients portion of each recipe. Additionally, use the specific pan sized called for in each of these recipes. If the pan you use is bigger than the pan I recommend, your bread will be flat.
Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yjGDjjk7OA
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