I have made these so many times in the last few weeks and have shared the recipe with many friends. They are delicious and so easy! I don’t really like the taste of Palm shortening, so I used coconut oil, softening it in the microwave, not melting. But don’t put it in wet ingredients because the coldness from the eggs will harden it again. Mix with dry ingredients, working out all the lumps with hands and distributing it evenly. I double the recipe and then separate it. I have added rosemary or dill or jalapenos/bacon/cheese to batter. So delicious. I am going to try more variations and add other herbs as I go. Thank you so much for such a great recipe. I was missing bread and these are perfect for chicken salad, tuna salad, turkey burgers, etc. And…. I save so much money because the gluten free breads in the grocery store are so expensive.
these were amazing. I was skeptical at first because of other failed experiments. I decided to try these one more time and it worked. High in ww points at 6 but worth it. I didn’t have a mould but use 1/2 cup measure and made 4 “pancakes” each about 5 ” round and baked for 10 minutes. Used coconut oil instead of palm oil, the only change I made. Worth the effort and will make this routine. Thanks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ysLjd-F9dI
Like a lot of others, mine didn’t rise as much as I had hoped, so the crumb is a bit more dense. Next time, I’ll give it longer than an hour and see if that helps. My loaf pan is also a bit bigger, so I think I’ll do 1.5 times the recipe next time for a larger slice of bread as mine was very short and squat, lol. Overall though, I’m thrilled. This is by far the best grain-free bread I’ve ever tasted!
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IsZmHSKqSU
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
Have to laugh with me — I mixed it all up in my cuisinart, popped it in the perfect sized, non stick bread pan and put it in the oven for 5 minutes before I realized I’d forgotten the Apple Cider Vinegar! (Which helps the baking soda do its work, right?) I grabbed it out, poured the vinegar on top and stirred it up and shoved it back in. It came out fine, believe it or not! I’m having earth balance margarine on it, with some honey, Yum. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wS5Cfr6OfuU
Hi Ruth. I used to buy my almond flour online from Amazon but now I made my own as it’s too expensive here. I’ve found that even using almond chips, ground up in a coffee bean grinder works. The coconut flour that I used to use in the UK was purchased from Holland & Barrett. Holland & Barrett sometimes have special offers too, so keep an eye out for them! I totally agree with you on the different quality of baking varying between flour brands! I’ve had some disasters with poorer quality at times! Hope this helps!
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating.
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
Hi Tanya, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear you are having trouble finding the loaf pan. If you bake this bread in a 9×5 inch loaf pan it will be very flat, as this recipe only makes enough batter to fill the pan halfway. I haven’t tested this in other pans, so I’m not sure what would work. If you experiment with mini loaf pans please let us know how it goes, that might work and I’m curious to hear about it!
Maya, I can’t tell you how excited I am to find this recipe! I have three young cats who are on a raw diet. In my previous life I was a home economics major and was taught not to waste anything. So from making their raw food I have the byproducts of egg whites and chicken bones and skin. It all gets frozen for future use. I use the bones and skin to make my own bone broth but I have egg whites out the ying yang! They are frozen in jars with the measurement of the contents on the lid. Now I’m going to thaw some and make bread! Have you tried making french toast with this?

The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqA3yHdSeSM
I made you Paleo Bread today. It was YUMMY with my grass-fed Beef Vegetable Soup. I didn’t change one thing (except I only had a 8.5×4-inch glass loaf pan–my smallest). It turned out great. It did stick a little on the very center bottom. I think I may have been a little anxious to get it out of the pan, but your suggested pan would be a much better choice.
With only 8 ingredients, and no yeast, rising time, or boiling, these quick bread bagels are far easier to make than the “regular” kind. Fans tell me they like to use a variety of different flavorings for them including onion, poppy seeds, and sesame seeds. These gluten-free bagels are great for brunch with smoked salmon or lox, and if you can have dairy, a nice smear of cream cheese.
What is the tunnel effect? A hole or a tunnel of “less-cooked” batter as I am encountering? It’s not raw enough to not eat. Just a tad denser and wetter. But it’s truly delicious. I finish it off under the broiler for 2-3 minutes other wise the too does not brown even after 30-33 minutes. Any suggestions on cooking all the way through? (Oh…I should ad that I’m using a 5×9 Pyrex for baking. That’s prolly part of the problem).
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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