Elana – I would love it if you would share more of your cooking notes with your readers. I think it would really help those of us who need or want to experiment with ingredients and/or quantities. For instance, I made this bread and find it too “eggy” so I might try it again with one fewer egg. If I knew more about your process it could help mine. Thanks for all of your hard work! I get frustrated with one bad cooking experiment — you do it for a living!
I just made this today. It is awesome! I try to stay away from gluten as much as possible due to joint issues and pain. It helps considerably. This bread was easy and I even changed a few things. First, I put in 1/4 cup of hemp hearts in place of 1/4 cup of almond meal. For honey, I was out, I used date palm sugar. Finally, I was a bit short of coconut oil, so I added a bit of olive oil. The bread came out amazing. It fits into my diet, it is quick, easy, and yummy! Thanks so much.
Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMOjVYgYaG8

The problem with substituting the eggs for something else is that the texture of your bread won’t be light and fluffy like normal wheat bread. If your son is allergic to the egg whites I would use just the yolks. But if he can’t have eggs at all, you can try using flax or chia seeds – (3 T water with 1 T ground flax seed = 1 egg). Please let me know how it goes.

Hi Ruth. I used to buy my almond flour online from Amazon but now I made my own as it’s too expensive here. I’ve found that even using almond chips, ground up in a coffee bean grinder works. The coconut flour that I used to use in the UK was purchased from Holland & Barrett. Holland & Barrett sometimes have special offers too, so keep an eye out for them! I totally agree with you on the different quality of baking varying between flour brands! I’ve had some disasters with poorer quality at times! Hope this helps!
I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEgD1Qstko

Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work!
Begin by making your filling, this has a jam consistency. In a medium saucepan, combine raspberries, honey, lemon juice and lemon zest. Heat to a medium to medium high heat, until mixture begins to bubble. Let bubble for 1-2 minutes, then lower heat to a simmer. While simmering, be sure to mash the berries with a wooden spoon. Cook for an additional 2-3 minutes, remove from heat. Add in chia seeds. Let cool for 5-10 minutes before transferring to a glass jar or dish, and place in the fridge to cool completely. This will take about 1 hour, but you can also make the filling and let sit overnight. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCXMw7xyKao

OMG-made this recipe for fun(I have no dietary restricions about gluten or grains or any allergies) Followed recipe exactly and used three 4″mini springform pans. These buns came out awesome! Texture and taste like real actual bread! Eating one wih chicken salad as I type! I’ve tried other bread recipes before using almond or coconut flours and never came out worthy of the effort and cost involved but these are amazing! I love that it is a small batch using simple minimal ingredients so u dont end up with a ton of something u can’t eat fast enough before it goes bad(not that these would even last that long if I quadrupled the recipe…!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urGzfAW70PY
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iMM4Cx_bKk

Hi Tanya, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear you are having trouble finding the loaf pan. If you bake this bread in a 9×5 inch loaf pan it will be very flat, as this recipe only makes enough batter to fill the pan halfway. I haven’t tested this in other pans, so I’m not sure what would work. If you experiment with mini loaf pans please let us know how it goes, that might work and I’m curious to hear about it!
Now make the crust: Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line an 8x8 square pan with parchment paper and lightly grease. Combine all of the crust ingredients into a food processor and pulse until mixture is crumbly. Take mixture and carefully distribute over the parchment paper, pressing down firmly and evenly. Place inside the oven and bake for 13 minutes, or until lightly golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool for 20 minutes. Leave the oven hot.
Hi Elana, first let me say this bread is DELICIOUS! It turned out sweet, very moist, and just wonderful. HOWEVER, I am new to gluten free baking and despite the deliciousness of the bread, I ended up with a very faint ammonia-ish smell/after-taste and for the life of me I cannot figure out why. The only difference in the way I made my bread from your recipe is that I used whole, raw almond meal and whole, raw flaxseed meal, because that is what I had on hand. Oh and i used pure maple syrup instead of honey.
However, I’ve made the Paleo bread twice and the same thing happened both times. The inside of the bread developed a huge hole and was not cooked. I’ve made the Paleo Pumpkin bread five times and had no problems, which makes me ask: since the Pumpkin bread bakes for 45 minutes, could there be a typo in this recipe and perhaps the bread should bake longer than 30 minutes?
Hi Broke, so there are a few things that could be affecting the texture of your bread. First, do you have an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you need it to be? This could affect the baking time. It’s ok if you need to bake it longer, and I would let it cook until you test the middle of the bread with a stick inserted into the center. Only when it comes out clean you remove it from the oven.
Hi Christy, It might be a little more difficult, but in theory possible. You’d need to stir the dry ingredients, then use a hand mixer instead of food processor to mix them with the butter. Then, after beating the egg whites separately, you’d need to mix in part of them, trying not to break them down, then fold in the rest once it’s easier to fold.

umm, hard to say what may have caused this to happen. A few things I can think of are the temperature in your oven, the other ingredients you used, and the way you measured them. It’s so hard to say. I’ve made this bread with Welbee’s so it’s not that. Are you using measuring spoons and cups? I think you should try again. If you can purchase an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it during baking I would do that. Every oven is so different… Here’s one for $6.51 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1WcJ1tv. Also, when you use test your bread with the stick, be sure to insert it all the way in, and in a couple different places. Please let me know how it goes when you make it again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrlFu0Lsqbc
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