Nice and firm. Baked it on the recommended temp, added 6 or 7 minutes. Pressed the middle and it was great. I let it cool. What was nice about it was obviously it’s low carb bread…hurray for that, but it cut well. Got 18 slices easily about 1/2 inch thick without breakage. Most importantly, it wasn’t greasy, or almond tasting overload, just delicious.

I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this!


Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yjGDjjk7OA

Hi Maya, I have made this twice and the first was actually closer than the second! The second one was raised really well when I put the foil on for the last 10-15 mins of cook time and when I took it out 12 mins later it had completely fallen! Now it is almost wet in the center though there are air pockets in it, it’s very odd. The first loaf was pretty flat the whole time and I am pretty sure that was because I didn’t have my egg whites whipped enough but they were spot on for the second loaf. I am also thinking it might be my baking powder after reading some of the comments. I plan to try again and just use a baking soda/cream of tartar mix rather than the baking powder. Any other suggestions? Anyone? LOL!

I just wanted to say that I made this bread and it came out fantastic! I’m very pleased with it. It held together nicely and had a good taste. I felt it was also a great base for maybe some nut additions or raisin bread for a sweet twist. I’m definitely going to be playing around with this recipe. It was so EASY to put together too! Just perfect for a busy family trying to stay healthy and feel good. Thanks so much Elana!
Made this yesterday and it looked/tasted beautiful! Did not do anything special (whipping the white, creaming the butter, etc) .. just folded gently and it was just a beautiful golden color. I topped it with sesame seeds because the flax seeds had already been put away. I put the dough into two mini-loaf pans and they fit perfectly. Perfect way to get my bread cravings with gest. diabetes and got two thumbs up from my diabetic dad, too, who eventually stole my other loaf! Will be making again and again. Thank you!

Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnTEnvdLl7E

I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D85tDRhO1Ow
That is EXACTLY what I just started reading through the comments to find out! I’m not that successful a baker anyway, and we’ve lived in CO for the last three years and the altitude has killed all but the easiest recipes for me. And now I’ve been diagnosed with a condition requiring gluten-, dairy-, sugar-, and soy-free. I’m looking forward to trying this recipe!

The Paleo diet, also referred to as the caveman or Stone-Age diet, includes lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Proponents of the diet emphasize choosing low-glycemic fruits and vegetables. There is debate about several aspects of the Paleo diet: what foods actually existed at the time, the variation in diets depending on region (e.g., tropical vs. Arctic), how modern-day fruits and vegetables bear little resemblance to prehistoric wild versions, and disagreement among Paleo diet enthusiasts on what is included/excluded from the diet. Because of these differences, there is not one “true” Paleo diet.
This bread, I guess you could say, has more of a “cake-y” texture than a real “bread-y” feel to it: it’s really soft and moist, kind of like a heavy pound cake, perhaps, but one that would be savory. Not an unpleasant texture at all, if you ask me, and it’s so crazy tasty and more-ish, you soon get to thinking that you’d much rather be eating this than any old piece of traditional bread.
Baking with almond flour can sometimes be tricky and not all brands give you the same results. Actually, the one you cited is my least favorite and usually makes baked goods sink in the middle, get very dense and also crumbly. I highly suggest you use one of the brands of blanched almond flour I recommend. My favorites are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts(.com). Here’s Welbee’s on Amazon for $23 for 2 LB http://amzn.to/1M5cDzG
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiBvw_euzEw
4. Raw food is for the birds (too much of it, anyway). There’s paleo, and then there’s the raw diet. Folks who eat raw tout the health benefits of the approach, saying that they’re accessing the full, complete nutrients available because they’re not heating, and thus destroying, their dinner. But that’s simply wrong. We cook to get our hands on more nutrients, not fewer. According to Wrangham, the one thing absolutely all cultures have in common is that they cook their food. He points out that women who move towards 100 percent raw diets often stop ovulating, because even if in theory they’re tossing sufficient food into the blender to fulfill their caloric needs, they simply can’t absorb enough from the uncooked food.
Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books
While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sE-LIUjxog
How many eggs did you use when you increased it by 50%? I had a mini loaf pan that was 3 1/2″ by 6″ It came put great but when I got to the center of the loaf I did find a small spot that was still raw dough. Not enough to ruin the loaf though. I used a combination of Bob’s Red Mill almond flour and King Arthur almond flour. Anxious to try it in a full sized loaf pan though if I can figure out how many eggs to use. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po3If8ARqDQ

Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y3BVezBNjs

Read reviews of dense or no rise results and decided to try whisking egg whites and yolks separately as one would for a sponge cake. Confess to adding a pinch of cream of tartar to whites, shouldn’t upset the purists, it’s one of the ingredients in baking powder. Then added the wet ingredients to yolk mix before mixing into whites. Gently folded in mixed dry ingredients (I only had whole almond meal so the bread is dark, like whole wheat would look). It turned out perfect, rose to top of pan, slices beautifully , light and delicious. Thanks so much for this recipe, I love it.
You don’t often equate coconuts as being savory, but there are a few things in play here that get this to work. The use of coconut flour replaces the typical wheat-based flour used in most store bought bread. The savory comes from a combination of flax meal, sea salt, and olive oil. Coconut flour provides the right texture and helps this taste like a bread, and is one of the more popular flours used in Paleo baking because it has more of a light and airy taste and feel to it. Since it is derived from coconuts no grains are harmed in the process. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bN_xst3yvKw
Here is your chance to make pumpkin bagels that can help usher in fall, and also are great any time of the year. They are made with real pumpkin of course, as well as a host of additional ingredients to make them taste great without being bad for you in any way. Just be sure to follow the Paleo instructions, as this is a multi-purpose recipe but they’ve included the necessary substitutes to keep it Paleo. These taste great with grass-fed butter on them, and you can even try using a Paleo-friendly cream cheese if you feel up to it.
YUM! I am going into week 3 of Paleo and missed bread. This is yummy although I need I smaller pan because it’s short. Not that that matters, I eat it alone or with grass-fed butter anyway! 🙂 I did have flax seeds, just the ground flax. And I used coconut oil (not butter) and coconut cream. It came out great! I cooked it for 35 minutes because even though the toothpick came out clean, it still didn’t “look” done. 35 minutes was perfect! Thanks for the recipe!
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3tXE5vqisA
Thanks so much for the link love, dear Elana! I’m so, so happy you are enjoying our bees’ honey! :-) I’ve been making a similar paleo bread of late, but mine doesn’t contain coconut flour or ACV. I’m intrigued with your variations, but more importantly I know it’s good as you have just posted this recipe and I’ve already seen folks reference it in their posts! Now that’s a stellar recommendation, my friend! ;-)
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xO9hgIjup6c
The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrpA7FjV8w4
Thank you for sharing this recipe, I made them in a 8 inch square baking dish and cut into 4, which worked great! I just bought a muffin top pan today and will be using that to make a double batch this weekend! Taste and texture of these are amazing! Just what I needed for sandwiches to take to work! NOW, I’m intrigued and will be trying your other recipes! Thanks again 🙂 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QL6FUI7rWUY

Paleo baked goods are free of gluten, refined sugars, and dairy. If you’ve perfected regular baking and now you’ve gone paleo, you might be surprised at just how different this way of baking is. I find that in order to get the closest simulation of regular bread (i.e., bread that has gluten), it’s often useful to use a combination of a few different paleo-friendly flours.
Our ancestors didn't chase cows and chickens around in the wild. They hunted game, antelopes, buffalo, and probably some animals we've never heard of that are long extinct. Their meat was generally quite lean, and provided more healthy omega 3s than meats from modern day animals, even the grass-fed ones, according to Dr. Katz. Many of the plants that thrived back then are also extinct today, making it impossible to truly follow their meal plan, he says.
My son can’t have eggs, so I did MAJOR substitutions, and it still turned out yummy. We usually use flax for eggs, but since this recipe already calls for flax, I used 5 different eggs substitutes: 1/4 coconut yogurt, 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup vegetable oil (I used olive), 2 heaping tbsp potato starch, 2 heaping tbsp arrowroot powder. Perhaps because we couldn’t use the eggs, there wasn’t a hard crust, but again, it was still yummy. We have to make do in a no egg diet ;). I also didn’t have the correct size loaf pan, so I used two mini loaf pans and baked them for about 25 minutes. Hope someone sees this who has to eat an egg-free diet :).
I made this bread today and it is AMAZING!!! I’ve been eating paleo, gluten free and dairy free since early November and the ONLY thing I have missed is bread. I can’t believe how light and moist this delicious bread is. It was wonderful warm and smeared with a layer of sunbutter and it made an amazing tuna sandwich later when it was cooled down. The only thing I would do differently next time is try not to eat the entire loaf in one day!! Thank you so much Elena. It’s PERFECT!
Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham. This book argues that the ease of digestion and the added nutritional value available in cooked food was the key behind the explosion of human intelligence. (Cooking gelatinizes starch, denatures protein, and softens all foods, permitting more complete digestion and energy extraction. As a result, the food processing apparatus shrinks, freeing energy to support a larger brain.) He then suggests that cooking led to what eventually became marriage and the sexual division of labor. The two most helpful reviews at Amazon get into great detail. The reviews average to 4+ stars.
As you might expect from the previous paragraph, eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables naturally leads to higher fiber intake. Dietary fiber is essential for good health, and despite what you’ve probably heard, whole grains aren’t the place to find it. Non-starchy vegetables contain eight times more fiber than whole grains and 31 times more fiber than refined grains. Even fruits contain twice as much fiber as whole grains and seven times more fiber than refined grains! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnDzsN7ksME
On his website, Sisson writes that "while the world has changed in innumerable ways in the last 10,000 years (for better and worse), the human genome has changed very little and thus only thrives under similar conditions." This is simply not true. In fact, this reasoning misconstrues how evolution works. If humans and other organisms could only thrive in circumstances similar to the ones their predecessors lived in, life would not have lasted very long. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkdRgTzaJtY
You’ve gotta love the folks over at TGIPaleo, they really know their stuff and it seems they’re always tinkering around in the caveman kitchens trying to whip up palatable Paleo food that keeps you within the Paleo guidelines. Here they’re doing their best to perfect the art of Paleo bread making, and they seem to have gotten it right on this one. Just to be sure they’ve gone and replicated their efforts in second version, covered below. They’ve used a combination of coconut flour, ground flax for heartiness, fiber and omega-3s, and arrowroot flour for added texture and taste.
The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRafxW1OaUc
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