Just made this bread tonight and I love the texture. I am still deciding on the taste. It reminds me of cornbread which isn’t a bad thing, necessarily. I think when I make an actual sandwich out of it I will not even notice the difference. Also thinking it could be good for a casserole of some sort. We also had your Chipotle Orange Chicken and that was a big hit! I am loving this site, a huge THANK YOU!

This easy Paleo Bread recipe tastes great and is made with just 7 nutrient dense ingredients. That’s a good thing because “gluten-free” isn’t necessarily healthy, especially when it comes to bread. That’s why I created a gluten-free paleo bread recipe that’s made of high-protein ingredients that won’t leave you dragging. I’m loving every slice that comes from this new paleo diet friendly bread recipe.
I made this recently and it was fantastic! Thank you. Although I don’t usually eat dairy, I used Greek yogurt instead of coconut cream because of the calorie difference. I recalculated the loaf based on 10 slices and found that each slice was 186 calories, so it was much less than the 280 listed. I calculated 17.5 grams carbs, 4.1 grams fiber, 13.4 net carbs, and 10.2 grams fat. Of course, the calculations depend on the brands that you use. I used Bob’s Red Mill brand Golden Flax Seed Meal, Super Fine Almond Flour (but have ordered Wellbee’s for future use), and Arrow Root flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSvXnAYW4Tg
When following the Paleo diet, you will cut the trans fats and the omega-6 polyunsaturated fats in your diet and increase the healthful monounsaturated and omega-3 fats that were the mainstays of our ancestors. Recent large population studies, known as meta analyses, show that saturated fats have little or no adverse effects upon cardiovascular disease risk.
Hi Sara! Hmmm, I’m not sure- I haven’t tried anything else. I don’t think there would be a good sub for almond flour. I do have another sandwich bread recipe that is nut free and paleo- it’s in my ebook. It only takes 1/2 cup cassava flour! You can find it here if you are interested. https://paleoglutenfree.com/shop/quick-easy-paleo-breads/ Sorry I don’t have a good sub for the almond!
This was my first foray into paleo breadmaking (and eating). DELICIOUS! I had to leave the room or else I would have eaten the whole loaf. I’m experimenting with recipes to try and find a GF sandwich bread that my kids will like. I’m going to make this again but will either use the coconut cream or use sweetened yogurt or add honey to make it a little sweeter. I’m also thinking about making it in a tin can so I can cut it into round slices.

LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.


This raisin bread will have you wondering if it really is Paleo, or if you’ve just cheated on your diet program. But no worries, everything checks out and you can eat this in moderation just like anything else dubbed acceptable. With ingredients like sweet potatoes, coconut flour, eggs, butter, and raisins, how can you go wrong? She’s managed to exclude all of the things that give the body a hard time in regards to digesting and processing, and replaced them with items that are known to be easy to digest and absorb.

Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzWfAVhXcNs
First things first. And this is of utmost importance. Woot Woot is STILL cool. Says me. Because I say it all the time, so it just HAS to be cool, right?! Wait, since I’m the most uncool person on the planet, you probably should stop saying woot woot immediately. 😉 Second, I had ZERO clue you used to be an almond butter-making maniac! Oh I wish I was your bestie during THAT fun phase of your life! Now you are just a no-bake brainiac! (<– see what I did there?). These bars are FAB, just like all the rest of your no-bake bars! They look super creamy and uber dreamy… and most dangerous, because who in the world could eat just one (or 5) of these babies?! SO GOOD! Pinned of course! Cheers, sweets! And haaaaappy Galentine's Day!! XOXOXOX
Help! I followed the recipe to the letter. I used butter and greek yogurt. Something went horribly wrong. I used 88grams of butter as i don’t have tablespoons (converted on the internet) and organic micro fine almond flour. My mixture was not a batter it resembled a pastry mix. What am I doing wrong. I think its the flour? I live in England so have to find where I can purchase the product over here.

I found your recipes and was eager to try them! This morning I made the almond and coconut flour bread, blueberry muffin and the pancakes for family breakfast. They were all delicious!! I was amazed at how moist they were. However, even thought the bread was light, it did not achieve the height shown with the recipe. I need advice on how to achieve a higher loaf. My family was delighted at the healthier version of our Sunday morning breakfast. Thank you, Maya, for the time and effort spent in perfecting and sharing your recipes.


The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.
Hi Kristi, I’m glad you liked the taste! Sorry it didn’t rise for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Were the peaks in the egg whites not firm enough, or did they fall too much when folding with the rest of the batter? That is the main culprit I can think of, as the egg whites are a big part of what creates the volume in this bread.
Jump up ^ Ramsden, C.; Faurot, K.; Carrera-Bastos, P.; Cordain, L.; De Lorgeril, M.; Sperling, L. (2009). "Dietary Fat Quality and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Unified Theory Based on Evolutionary, Historical, Global, and Modern Perspectives". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine. 11 (4): 289–301. doi:10.1007/s11936-009-0030-8. PMID 19627662.

Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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