Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiBvw_euzEw
I just wanted to mention, because I don’t believe it has come up yet, that I substituted ground sunflower seeds for the almond flour (they are much cheaper and I have successfully used them in many almond flour recipes!) however I noticed something very odd this time… the bread was green when it came out of the oven! I was stumped, but after some research, found out that baking soda reacts with the chlorophyll in sunflower seeds and turns them green.
I have made this now about 10 times. The first time I made them too thin. I use two muffin top pans (6 wells in each) and I filled 8 the first time. Then I went to six and it was perfect. My grandson is so happy we have bread again. Everyone loves it slathered in kerrygold butter. I make a double batch to get 12 pieces. I also make a single batch with garlic, extra salt and Parmesan cheese in the batter. I sprinkled some cheese on top of the batter before baking. The garlic bread was so delicious! Thanks for a super simple delicious recipe that I can make in five minutes.
I’m a big fan of yours and have, over the five years since our family went gluten-free/Paleo, used many of your recipes with great success, especially those for the Jewish holidays. Our recent discovery was your chocolate hamentaschen recipe (https://elanaspantry.com/chocolate-raspberry-hamantaschen/) – which was very well received by our family, our synagogue (and not just the other GF individuals), and most of the kids in both girls’ school classes. And it really was so easy to make, which I especially appreciated, since we always make a lot to share!
Hi Eva, That’s awesome that you are helping your son this way. I haven’t tried this with other tools, but you could probably use either the blender or the food processor. The key is to pulse in step 5, not just constantly blend, so that the whites don’t fully break down. Other than that, it should be pretty similar. As for the yolks, if you don’t want to make creme brulee, I usually just put a couple extras into an omelet (or breakfast casserole, or any other dish requiring cooked eggs) mixed with whole eggs.
Our hefty cousins, the apes, spend half their waking hours gnawing on raw sustenance, about six hours per day. In contrast, we spend only one hour. “So in a sense, cooking opens up this space for other activities,” says Pollan. “It’s very hard to have culture, it’s very hard to have science, it’s very hard to have all the things we count as important parts of civilization if you’re spending half of all your waking hours chewing.” Cooked food: It gave us civilization.
I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6RGTb3Yki0
I just made this today. It is awesome! I try to stay away from gluten as much as possible due to joint issues and pain. It helps considerably. This bread was easy and I even changed a few things. First, I put in 1/4 cup of hemp hearts in place of 1/4 cup of almond meal. For honey, I was out, I used date palm sugar. Finally, I was a bit short of coconut oil, so I added a bit of olive oil. The bread came out amazing. It fits into my diet, it is quick, easy, and yummy! Thanks so much.
Delicious! I had to use white rice flour as I didn’t have coconut and it wasn’t available at the store across the street. It smelled a bit odd, but tastes great! Anyone have any ideas as to why all my breads come out the height of biscotti (ok, maybe a little taller, but not much)? I use a Pyrex glass loaf pan. I try to avoid using Aluminum cookware and I’m tempted to try the cast iron pan that several people raved about, but I am definitely looking for a sandwich bread shape. I would love some feedback on that.

In low carb and keto baking, we’re concerned with two things: 1) keeping carbs low, and 2) still achieving a baked good that has great flavor and texture (because if we can’t gag it down there’s just no point, right? Lol). Low carb bread recipes are usually gluten free and grain free (although we’ve seen a couple that use oat fiber), but then the challenge is to get creative to get the right combination of ingredients to yield something that rises properly and tastes good.
Thank you – thank you – thank you!!! I LOVE this bread. I followed the recipe exactly and did have to bake an extra 10 minutes but that was the only change – and I use the small disposable aluminum bread pan (bread pops right out) This bread is wonderful…not only easy to slice but easy to slice thin and the slices hold up great in a sandwich (no matter what the filling is) and it tastes great. This is my new best bread. I told my husband that he would probably even like it but we’ll never know since it is gluten free :^)
Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vX92H9KpVA
By latest count, about 800 Hiwi live in palm thatched huts in Colombia and Venezuela. In 1990 Ana Magdalena Hurtado and Kim Hill—now both at Arizona State University in Tempe—published a thorough study (pdf) of the Hiwi diet in the neotropical savannas of the Orinoco River basin in Southwestern Venezuela. Vast grasslands with belts of forest, these savannas receive plenty of rain between May and November. From January through March, however, precipitation is rare: the grasses shrivel, while lakes and lagoons evaporate. Fish trapped in shrinking pools of water are easy targets for caiman, capybaras and turtles. In turn, the desiccating lakes become prime hunting territory for the Hiwi. During the wet season, however, the Hiwi mainly hunt for animals in the forest, using bows and arrows. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b1YEsmGb1I
Hi Mindy – same here. But I did read in a comment about 1 or 2 years ago the same thing. From what I remember from those comments, others said the type of food we make from Elana’s baked recipes are just not designed to sit for more than 2 – 3 days. Other commenters chimed in and said their family eats up everything they bake, so nothing sits long enough to get the 3-day-old smell.
I’m excited to hear that! If I have a chance to do any recipe testing myself, I will let you know if I come up with anything worthwhile . . .Staying tuned and looking forward to it! Is there any way for me to be notified of your replies to my comment(s)? I had to come back to this page to see this, so just wondering (and I do have the box clicked about “notify me of follow-up comments by email”). Thanks again!

My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible.


Sounds great. I just wondered if I chose to use just coconut flour and not almond, how much more coconut flour would I use than the original recipe calls for? I know that coconut flour soaks up much more liquid than almond floud so not sure if I would also need to add more liquid and if so what and how much? I’m new to paleo and not much of a cook but I’m trying to change that, esp with this new lifestyle change I’m trying to make. The Paleo bread I can get in stores is just too expensive, so I’m trying to do this on my own to save money. Also I need something like this to use with almond butter as a post-workout snack after hitting the gym. Options for portable protein are really limited, so that would work the best. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jm16Jr1Qtp8

Was very excited to try this recipe (amended version) because it did not call for rice flour and because it was GF and Paleo. However, after spending the $15.00 + $11.00(s/h) for the pan, and the cost of the ingredients, I am very disappointed. Bread looked good and spelled good until cutting it and found that the center was raw, gooey, and smelled bad. Had to throw it all away.
The Great Cholesterol Con: The Truth About What Really Causes Heart Disease and How to Avoid It by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick reveals that high cholesterol levels do not cause heart disease; that high-fat diets–saturated or otherwise–do not affect blood cholesterol levels; and that for most men and all women the benefits offered by statins are negligible at best. Other data is also provided that shows that statins have many more side affects than is often acknowledged.
Hi, i love your blog and recipes! Just starting in Paleo with no grains and sugar at all for a month(being a Celiac for year and a half). I did the recipe with no Flax seeds just replace it using more coconut flour and used applesauce instead honey. The result look very different from your picture and has a strong egg flavor. I am thinking using jam instead applesauce next time and using more almond flour than coconut, any advices? Thanks!
Just took this bread out the oven….YUM! I didn’t have arrowroot powder or cornstarch, so I substituted that for gluten-free all-purpose flour, and it came out amazing. I also substituted a the whole flax-seed with rolled oats, added 2 tbs of chia seeds (I wanted a high protein bread) The only thing I would add: 1tbsp of honey to cut a bit of the overly savory-taste. I used a 9″x4″ loaf pan, so my bread unfortunately isn’t sandwich bread height, but what can I do to fix that?? Just use a smaller pan or make more to fill out the volume better? I know others have asked the same question, but the only solution I saw, and felt was reasonable, was to make 1.5x the amount of mix….has anyone tried this? I was wondering if anyone has tried to use 2 whole eggs and 2 whites instead of 4 whole eggs….any insight as to how this would change the bread?

I have done this many times in many different ways. I used a regular size muffins pan and make dinner rolls for the holidays. English muffins rings for burger size buns, and whoopee pie pans for slider size buns. I use a standard size ice cream scoop for the rolls and slider buns (1 level scoop) and 2 scoops for the larger burger buns. Usually bake rolls and sliders for 20-25 minutes and for the bigger buns, start checking them at 25-30 minutes. Hope this encourages you to experiment,
Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work!

Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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