The Great Cholesterol Con by Anthony Colpo. The definitive book on the non-dangers of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat was The Cholesterol Myths by Uffe Ravnskov, 2000. This book is six years newer. Its forward is by Uffe Ravnskov. To get a wonderful description of the book read the leading review at Amazon. The many reviews there average to 5 stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U1qQM2vV_E

Well something is wrong it keeps telling me a problem has occurred with the website and realoading. I didn’t use any wheat flour only the sunflower seed flour I made. I whipped the egg whites with some cream of tarter. I will try your blender idea. I did not take a picture but it came out heavy and dense but it did rise pretty good considering I toasted the sunflower flour after I made the flour because I did t know I was supposed to do it before. It made it a little freaky. I will cut back on the butter next time. I can’t tell you how much better the tast was from toasting the flour. Ok I better stop my computer does not want to cooperate. Thank you so much I will be in touch again thanks for the great recipes.
My stomach has been very upset lately because of grains, but when my stomach is burning and nauseated, bread or crackers is what I need to settle it, which I knew was a big no no (wheat is what made me sick). Then I stumbled on this recipe and all I can say is “Praise the Lord!”. Thank you so very much for sharing this. I made my own almond/sunflower seed butter and used chai meal in lieu of the flax and it turned out moist, fluffy, and surprisingly tasty! This blows away the gluten-free bread that I was eating for the past few years (I have tried them all) and the fact that it’s yeast and grain free is absolute heaven because I have candida and both mess me up. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyZ95ohpKjs
To determine the diet rankings, US News & World Report selected a 25-person expert panel from the country's top dietitians, dietary consultants, and physicians specializing in diabetes, heart health, and weight loss. The panel included Lisa Sasson, MS, RDN, CDN, a clinical assistant professor and dietetic internship director in the department of nutrition and food studies at New York University; Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, CHWC, FAND, a nutrition and diabetes expert; and David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, FACLM, founding director of Yale University's Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and founder of the True Health Initiative.4
Hi Adriana, thank you for this recipe. My youngest son has to eat gluten free and I’m trying to find a recipe for bread that he really likes (none so far). It’s just in the oven and I hope it turns out okay, because the batter wasn’t a batter, it was more of a dough… I followed your recipe to the letter: same ingredients, no overmixing… Do you have any idea what could have happened?
Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]

It is interesting in gluten free baking how seemingly minute changes can have a big effect on the taste, texture, consistency and rise of the finished product. I thought it was just me that had such an enhanced palate (since I have Fibromyalgia, CFS, etc) my senses and nerves are forever enhanced. In my vanilla oat banana quick bread recipe I have found that variations in the type of pan etc will change the entire finished product. I have tried it in a large loaf pan, mini loaves and muffins. This recipe which I created works best as mini loaves. Just last week I made it and I used my nutri bullet instead of my food processor to ground the oat, corn meal and corn starch flour blend I created and it made for a very fine powder. This change in the texture of of the flour gave the bread a different texture. It was a slight change that only I would have noticed but I was going crazy trying to pinpoint what made the difference. I pinpointed that in order to get the rise and texture I prefer, I need to use mini loaf pans and pulse my blend in the food processor. I feel like these variations are part of all baking but pronounced in gf baking for sure.

I also doubled the recipe in an attempt to make the loaf larger, because my loaf pans are bigger. After doubling, I took out enough of the batter to make 6 rolls in a muffin top pan. I filled the holes not quite to the top, then put the remaining batter into the loaf pan. It didn’t seem to help with the size of the loaf much. I may try it again using the full double batch. I added 7 minutes to my bake time for the bread and did the toothpick test. I have to say, I prefer the rolls, which I baked for 18 minutes. They are wonderful for breakfast when filled with an egg, sausage, and cheese!
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful.
Hi Kerstin, Sorry you had issues whipping the whites. It can sometimes be more difficult with the kind from a carton. The cream of tartar helps, but sometimes isn’t enough. Did you wait for the whites to be at room temp before beginning? This can help with whipping. Unfortunately the bread won’t turn out very well without getting the whites to stiff peaks. I hope it works for you next time, and if the cartons don’t work for you, you can try with the whites from whole eggs. You can use the yolks to make hollandaise sauce or creme brulee like this.
This looks awesome! Just wanted to say thank you. I’m a bomber cook, but when it comes to baking, I’m so grateful people like you are willing to play around in the kitchen and make all the mistakes for me. :) Also, I made your chocolate cream pie from your cookbook for a party and I swear, no one ever knows your desserts are GF and Primal-friendly. It’s gotten to where I always bring dessert so I know I can enjoy something, but then everyone ends up eating it too!

The Great Cholesterol Con by Anthony Colpo. The definitive book on the non-dangers of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat was The Cholesterol Myths by Uffe Ravnskov, 2000. This book is six years newer. Its forward is by Uffe Ravnskov. To get a wonderful description of the book read the leading review at Amazon. The many reviews there average to 5 stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U1qQM2vV_E


this bread is fabulous! i made it in a larger bread pan, making the loaf a bit short. . . Next time, i’ll use a pyrex bread pan (smaller) so that the loaf is a bit taller. Wondering if i could make 1.5 of the recipe for a taller loaf in my bigger pan. . . so many things to try. Oh and my kids loved it! They thought it was banana bread even though it isn’t really sweet, i think the texture gave them that impression. I am thinking i could use this as a base for a yummy banana bread, adding a banana or two. I’ll let you know if i try that.
I recently found out I’m allergic to many of the foods that I’ve consumed over the years and was recently told to eat strictly Paleo……..and for someone who needs a map and directions in her own kitchen, for someone who has singlehandedly kept the restaurant business in the black, that’s a pretty big expectation. This bread has saved me and my fiance in so many of those, “I can’t do this any longer” moments when we really miss the old way of eating. We cant recommend this bread enough! Thank you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl1hgPDevnc
These paleo 7 layer bars make the perfect gift for your friends and family since they look amazing and can be easily packaged.  It makes so much sense why I used to see these magical 7 layer bars everywhere during the holidays now.  Plus, they’re easy to make and, now that we can make them vegan, paleo, and even clean eating, you can share with almost anyone!
Contrary to popular belief, fat doesn’t make you fat; carbs do (and the Standard American Diet contains a ton of them!). Natural oils and fats are your body’s preferred sources of creating energy, so it’s best to give your body what it’s asking for. The following are some of the best types of paleo diet oils and fats that you can give your body if you’re in need of some additional energy.

Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xO9hgIjup6c
Hi Kerstin, Sorry you had issues whipping the whites. It can sometimes be more difficult with the kind from a carton. The cream of tartar helps, but sometimes isn’t enough. Did you wait for the whites to be at room temp before beginning? This can help with whipping. Unfortunately the bread won’t turn out very well without getting the whites to stiff peaks. I hope it works for you next time, and if the cartons don’t work for you, you can try with the whites from whole eggs. You can use the yolks to make hollandaise sauce or creme brulee like this.

Sounds like your baking soda is old and/or spoiled. It explains the lack of rise, tingling tongue, chemical taste (washing soda [sodium carbonate, I think] is made by heating baking soda [sodium bicarbonate] in big ovens), and maybe the extra salty flavor, too. I’ve had bad baking soda spoil baked goods, and it’s a real bummer. Hope you try again, though.
Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvA68vYZtDE
Proof the yeast. This involves mixing dry active yeast with water that’s just warm to touch (between 105-110°F to be precise) and maple syrup or honey for 7 minutes until foamy. And before you scream sugar (!!) remember that the yeast will feed on such sugar to emit carbon dioxide, so it doesn’t affect the carb count at all. And yes, this is a scientific fact.

Fresh fruits and vegetables naturally contain between five and 10 times more potassium than sodium, and Stone Age bodies were well-adapted to this ratio. Potassium is necessary for the heart, kidneys, and other organs to work properly. Low potassium is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke — the same problems linked to excessive dietary sodium. Today, the average American consumes about twice as much sodium as potassium! Following a Paleolithic diet helps to remedy this imbalance.


Hi Elana! Love this bread…have been making it for a couple of months now. Only one problem: I keep getting these cobwebs in the bread. It appears after a few days being kept sealed on the counter. Have you ever come across this problem? I assume if it was a problem of the bread going bad it would get mouldy…but this isn’t mould, it looks like cobwebs inside the bread. I read up on it and people say that the cobwebs are from moth eggs. Once I read that, I got rid of my original flours and purchased new items at a different store from a different brand. I made the bread right away and stored the flours in the fridge. Once again though, each bread I make..after 3-4 days, it got cobweby. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWy3u38J3aw
Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me.
Hi Sophie, I have found that the best almond flour for baking are the ones that have the skin removed (blanched) and are very finely ground. Some brands call it almond meal and some almond flour, so there’s no standard name currently. I have also found that not all brand work well. For example the Bobs Red Mill brand fails most of the time for baking. My personal favorite brands are by Honeyville and welbees. You may be able to order these from amazon.
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.

Ugh! It’s been an hour and it doesn’t look like my bread has hardly risen at all. I haven’t made any substitutions, my yeast was good, etc. I currently live in Italy, so it’s plenty warm here today. I’ve now warmed my oven up a bit, turned it off, and have the dough in there to see if I can get any kind of rise out of it before trying to cook. Fingers crossed!
Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y3BVezBNjs
More than a little into running and paleo recipes (yoga now too!) but I'm not here to rain on your grains (or anything else) so come along for the ride! I do a little too much of everything (except cleaning), and I enjoy laughing at myself. As long as I'm the one making the jokes, that is. Just kidding. So bring me your angst, your appetite and your frying pan and climb aboard!

I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s

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