Finally made this recipe, is my second bread recipe I’ve made and the top is nice but the inside always feels moist … I am putting it in the oven a bit more to see if it dries out, is that the texture that it should have because of the butter or what? I liked the flavor! Just not sure of how is supposed to be inside. I haven’t watched the video yet. Thanks!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mNPpm5tPD8
I am currently looking for a recipe to try in my recently acquired, but not-yet-used silicone challah mold (https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Perfect-Silicone-Bakeware-Braiding/dp/B005NAGY8O). Our family eats gluten-free, with a strong leaning towards a whole foods/Paleo diet. My husband and I are happy to enjoy a Shabbat dinner sans challah, though our 8- and 5-year-old daughters are very disappointed (especially when we are at synagogue and we ask them not to have any of the challah) to be missing out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIq35QNJlPs
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"Every fad diet thinks it has discovered the root of all evil," says Dr. Ochner. But nutrients in legumes, whole grains, and dairy—all of which are forbidden on the paleo diet—can help to lower the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, reduce blood pressure, and promote a healthy weight, he says. Cutting dairy, the primary source of calcium and vitamin D in modern diets, is especially worrisome for women who want to avoid osteoporosis.
Oh my goodness. I’m new to your site and this is the first recipe I have tried. It really is SUCH a tasty, flavorful bread. I did make some changes. I followed a comment on your pinterest pin for this recipe, and the person who tried it recommended 1/2 tsp xanthem gum in place of 1/2 cup arrowroot powder. I did this to lower the carb count and because arrowroot was the only ingredient I was lacking. It reminds me of a somewhat sweet, but still savory wheat flavored corn muffin. I’m sorry if that’s confusing. It’s a bit more tender/crumbly than sandwich bread though, and I do think that has to do with my substitution. For this reason it might be too delicate to support a sandwich. Regardless, it’s delicious as a side in a dish. I actually prefer it that way. Thank you again for sharing. So thankful.
I don’t have a processor big enough for the ingredients so I used my big mixer. I was afraid that the bread would come out tough because I used the mixer, but it wasn’t. It came out light and delicious, with a nice brown crusty crust and a soft inside-I love the nutty flavor. This one is a keeper- I’ll be making this often. Ditto your paleo breakfast bread.
Does anyone know the carb content of this bread. I just ordered some gf paleo bread from Julian’s bakery, but since it is pricey, I’d like to make my own. I am on a very low carb, paleo type lifestyle. I am also allergic to apples (crazy, right) and sulfites (so no regular vinegar), so I’m a little unsure of what to do about the apple cider vinegar. I may just try it and see if there’s a problem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdVlCoQFzIs
Oh my goodness. I’m new to your site and this is the first recipe I have tried. It really is SUCH a tasty, flavorful bread. I did make some changes. I followed a comment on your pinterest pin for this recipe, and the person who tried it recommended 1/2 tsp xanthem gum in place of 1/2 cup arrowroot powder. I did this to lower the carb count and because arrowroot was the only ingredient I was lacking. It reminds me of a somewhat sweet, but still savory wheat flavored corn muffin. I’m sorry if that’s confusing. It’s a bit more tender/crumbly than sandwich bread though, and I do think that has to do with my substitution. For this reason it might be too delicate to support a sandwich. Regardless, it’s delicious as a side in a dish. I actually prefer it that way. Thank you again for sharing. So thankful.
It is interesting in gluten free baking how seemingly minute changes can have a big effect on the taste, texture, consistency and rise of the finished product. I thought it was just me that had such an enhanced palate (since I have Fibromyalgia, CFS, etc) my senses and nerves are forever enhanced. In my vanilla oat banana quick bread recipe I have found that variations in the type of pan etc will change the entire finished product. I have tried it in a large loaf pan, mini loaves and muffins. This recipe which I created works best as mini loaves. Just last week I made it and I used my nutri bullet instead of my food processor to ground the oat, corn meal and corn starch flour blend I created and it made for a very fine powder. This change in the texture of of the flour gave the bread a different texture. It was a slight change that only I would have noticed but I was going crazy trying to pinpoint what made the difference. I pinpointed that in order to get the rise and texture I prefer, I need to use mini loaf pans and pulse my blend in the food processor. I feel like these variations are part of all baking but pronounced in gf baking for sure. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxU39NIEUEQ
Trying to devise an ideal diet by studying contemporary hunter-gatherers is difficult because of the great disparities that exist; for example, the animal-derived calorie percentage ranges from 25% for the Gwi people of southern Africa to 99% for the Alaskan Nunamiut.[40] Descendants of populations with different diets have different genetic adaptations to those diets, such as the ability to digest sugars from starchy foods.[40] Modern hunter-gatherers tend to exercise considerably more than modern office workers, protecting them from heart disease and diabetes, though highly processed modern foods also contribute to diabetes when those populations move into cities.[40]
Hi I am new to the grain free diet and I love this bread. Has anyone figured out the calorie count for it? I have been gluten free since 2003 and it has served me well, although I think that I could benefit from grain free. But like all diet changes that I have tried in the past I tend to gain weight if I do not know the calorie count of the new recipes. Thanks.
Hi Romy, almond flour is lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed. Same for the stevia! Good luck–let me know how it turns out! 🙂

I tried this several times and the taste was excellent, much better than expected. Even though not especially crumbly , it was for my monster sandwiches. So I tried a few times to modify it , and the one where I doubled the arrowroot and added one tablespoon of gum arabic worked really well. I looked up gum arabic in pubmed and could not find any negative effects, but some positive. Also I did use a substantial portion of butter from Brittany, which I found at Trader Joe’s. This butter is super tasty and since it is from southern europe probably approved by Dr. Gundry ( low casein A1).
This is really good. I only use 3 eggs,. I didn’t have any arrowroot powder, so I used cornstarch instead. I used lemon juice instead of ACV because ACV gives me migraines and I used coconut cream (don’t like yogurt). It tasted a bit like sweet bread, but it made an excellent sandwich. It didn’t rise like the picture. I’m sure it because of the substitutions I made. I always make sandwiches cutting the bread in half anyway so it didn’t matter that it didn’t rise as high as the picture shows. This will be my go to bread for now on. Oh yeah. I baked it for 45 minutes instead of 25. Ovens temperatures and climates varies for baking. I always baked paleo breads on 350 degrees for 45 minutes. It comes out perfect every time. Thank you so much for posted this recipe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zq0Ix-Vfoww
Thanks for this recipe.!!! And yes-almond flour can be so expensive… Prevents me from baking more often. The bread came out pretty good; I think I may have slightly over mixed the batter- a little on the flat side. But very tasty. Anyway- heads on sale at website is almond flour!!! I’m stocking UP! http://www.bobsredmill.com/almond-meal-flour.html?&cat=5&gclid=CjwKEAiAjfq2BRDpmdHmssaW5xsSJABToP4lRgdN9_Ei1DoeLx49ZGR6r32JWWvxNnENMQaXWid76hoCYCPw_wcB
My results: A nice golden loaf which did require an additional 10 min of bake time! I was very careful as to “fold” in the wet ingredients to the dry. It was “pourable” into the pan. I did not chill the coconut cream ( as I bought “cream” not milk). Next loaf I will chill it first. My loaf did not rise as much as in the picture, but only slightly “shorter”. So a smaller pain ( 7.25x 3.5) might fix this.
When eating Paleo you may find that you end up using vegan recipes a lot. This is not surprising because vegan cooking entails cutting out a lot of junk and only using wholesome sources. Of course you’ll be ruining the vegan-ness of it with the meat you’ll be having with it, but for side items like bread it’s totally OK to borrow a page from the vegan notebook. Here we have a bread that is both Paleo and vegan approved, and uses a bit of applesauce to give it a unique flavor. One thing to remember is that vegan cheese substitutes that you can find at the store will typically be Paleo friendly and actually taste pretty good.
Thank you Lexi for sharing your “Sandwich Paleo Rolls” recipe!! This is the second time that I have made them and each time I make a double batch!! I make the rolls in a muffin tin as I do not have the round forms. I also substituted coconut oil for palm oil — I used the same amount. These are GREAT right out of the oven with a bit of butter and some honey!! 🙂 The rolls are just as good and soft 3 days after baking them. Thank you!! Thank you!!

Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes expounds on his 2002 article in the NY Times (What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?) and then in Science Magazine (see below). He shows how public health data has been misinterpreted to mark dietary fat and cholesterol as the primary causes of coronary heart disease. Deeper examination, he says, shows that heart disease and other diseases of civilization appear to result from increased consumption of refined carbohydrates: sugar, white flour and white rice. Or in other words, without using the word Paleolithic, he justifies the paleo diet. Here is an excellent chapter by chapter summary of the book [archive.org].

The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--BtnfD9RmE
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