The most common reason that any bread falls is that it needed to bake for longer. That being said, I’ll be perfectly honest – sometimes this keto bread recipe falls anyway, even despite doing everything else right. Fortunately this isn’t a huge deal because it still tastes delicious – IF you baked it for long enough and the center is cooked through.
While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok4_JpAIG4w

I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn1DcZKU53A
Thanks for taking the time to post the Metric measures Pat. I’ve just made my first loaf, which is ok but I misread the ingredients and only put 1/2 tsp of baking powder in the mix ..duh! There’s another one baking right now with the correct amount in . Really looking forward to it. I’m going to slice it up and freeze it in portions so I can take out what I need and toast it. The only downside for me is the almond flour and coconut flour is very expensive in the uk. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeqwyVcRp7E

I’ve made this bread several times now in a traditional loaf pan and it came out great. A little short, but fully cooked and tasty and since i wasn’t using it to make a sandwich I was ok with the short, squatty loaf. The other day i decided to add the magic line loaf pan to my amazon order just to see what was so great about using this kind of pan. I made the recipe (the first one) just as I always have, same ingredients, same proportions, no subs and my bread came out barely cooked. The whole inside was raw. I continued to bake it and continued to bake it…..for another 45 min! and still raw. I pulled off the cooked “sides” and put the raw goopy mess back in the pan for another 30 min. Still raw in the middle. Not sure what’s so “magic” about this pan….???
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad.
This rose really nicely and is pretty light and fluffy. It doesn’t have the exact same texture as wheat bread, but we thought it was close enough. My husband and I enjoyed some turkey sandwiches today, and our 3 year old loved her “PB&J” with sunflower butter. I packed everyone’s lunch in the morning, and they were still good at noon (kept in a cooler).
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, photographer, videographer, clean eating expert, and mommy of four. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration.
The only downside is that it is small and we eat almost all of it in a day! I’d love to make several loaves at a time and freeze them. Have you tried freezing it? How do you wrap it and how long does it last in the freezer? Thanks so much for this recipe, it’s made going paleo so much easier for my family, especially when I think about school lunches!
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.
These looked amazing, so I made them. We are GF in this house and these are perfect for us. My 11 & 7 yo boys asked for more. That never happens with GF products. This is the first recipe that I have made at home that is easy and taste great. Thank you so much for posting! Just an FYI – Nutiva makes a organic, non gmo blend of red palm and coconut oils shortening. That is what I used and they came out awesome.
I also have had the “raw tunnel” of dough in the middle – TWICE now. I’ve followed the recipe to a “t,” except for the name brand Magic Line Pan (I do have the correct size pan though). Thanks for the tip to cover w/foil. I did it after the 30 min, but I’ll try it from the start. I also had added an extra 20 minutes. Strange ours turn out this way after reading how perfect others’ turn out?! Thanks gals! Happy baking!
Stacey thank you for that, I am trying out keto stuffing for Thanksgiving. Paola thank you for this recipe. I have made it twice. First time was a bit slimy as I didn’t grind my flours (lesson learned). 2nd one was perfection. My bread rises wonderfully. I put it out in my garage or on my back porch to rise…of course Yuma Arizona gives me a warmth advantage. Not sure how it will work in winter.
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY
I’ve been working on this Paleo Bread recipe for several months and have tested it a couple of dozen times. In fact, every time I create a recipe I test each and every ingredient addition or subtraction. That’s why I think it’s kinda funny when people leave comments below recipes (or on Instagram) asking how such and such ingredient substitution will turn out.
For example, although white potatoes were recorded as being available during the Paleolithic era, they are usually avoided on the Paleo diet because of their high glycemic index. Processed foods are also technically off limits due to an emphasis on fresh foods, but some Paleo diets allow frozen fruits and vegetables because the freezing process preserves most nutrients.
Wow !! This is my third try at Paleo bread recipe and definitely the best.I substituted one table spoon chia seeds(made it into a slurry first) for one egg as I was afraid the bread would be too eggy and my husband wouldn’t like it.It’s cooling on the counter and I just had to take a slice because it looks so perfect….delish !!Thanks so much for sharing this recipe.I’ll be enjoying bread regularly now.

Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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