I just made the paleo sandwich rolls, I was out of palm shortening so I used coconut oil. I also did not have applesauce on had and had notice someone had used cottage cheese — so I did. Baked it in an 8×8 glass pan. They just came out and cooled. I cut in to 4’s and sliced through the middle. I have to say they were a bit oily (maybe because of the coconut oil) but I chopped a bit off one and tasted it yum!! I put them in the fridge, can’t wait for my BLT tomorrow 🙂
Palm nuts and heart (Mauritia flexuosa)Brazilian Teal (Amazonetta brasiliensis)Wild root "Yatsiro" (Canna edulis)Red Brocket deer (Mazama americana)Wild root "No'o" (Dioscorea)Wild root "Oyo" (Banisteriopsis)Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)Guava (Psidium guava)Yellow-spotted river turtle (Podocnemis unifilis)Wild root "Hewyna" (Calathea allouia)Mata Mata turtle (Chelus fimbriatus)Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)Silver Mylosomma (Mylossoma duriventre)Iguana (Iguana iguana)Iguana (Iguana iguana)Orange (Citrus x sinensis)Roseate Spoonbill (Ajaja ajaja)Roseate Spoonbill (Ajaja ajaja)Collared peccary (Pecari tajacu)Wild rabbit (Sylvilagus varynaensis)Piranha (Serrasalmus)Trahira (Hoplias malabaricus)Collared anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla)Gold Tegu (Tupinambis teguixin)Mangoes (Mangifera)Wild legume "Chiga" (Campsiandra comosa)South American catfish (Pseudoplatystoma)Charichuelo (Garcinia madruno)Yellow-footed tortoise (Chelonoidis denticulata)Caiman (Caiman crocodilus)
So I’m pretty familiar with the science of baking, and I also understand there’s significant differences when omitting gluten. The recipe calls for sour cream, and vinegar, both acids that work best as leaveners when combined with baking soda, then baking powder (1 part soda 2 parts cream of tartar (another acid) and straight cream of tartar. So it calls for acid in four separate forms. In standard baking that calls for baking powder you add soda when adding additional acid such as sour cream, buttermilk etc… when a small amount of acid is added to bread dough it increases the yeasts ability to give lift by creating gluten, but to much kills the yeast entirely. So in the absence of gluten, isn’t the acid used here excessive? I wonder if a reduction would cause greater rise? What is the purpose of the baking powder combined with the yeast? Can you please explain the science behind this? P.S. the flavor of this was excellent but it didn’t rise as expected despite an excellent yeast test, fresh powder, and 1 hour in the proof box. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=og2X4Tb6LdE

Overall, the diet is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly from unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrate (specifically restricting high glycemic index carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. [2] The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (including the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA) come from marine fish, avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds.


I use parchment paper to avoid the aluminum in the pan and that makes a nice liner to lift out the loaf (no cleaning!). I’ve made it with coconut oil, ghee, and regular butter… it’s always yummy! I’ve substituted coconut sugar for the honey and once even made it without a sweetener… it’s always fantastic! Occasionally I’ll substitute chia for the flax seed, too, but the basic recipe is the backbone for all my experimenting.
Thank you Elana for posting such a delishious bread recipe. I followed the recipe as originally posted, but I didn’t feel there was enough batter, so I made another batch and added it to the first. The only change was I added aprox. 1 tsp. of cream of tartar. I used unpasturized dark honey, but next time I will only use 1 TBS. instead of the 2 for when I double the recipe. I think 1 TBS. will be plenty enough. I also baked the loaf a little longer until it was browned because of it’s thickness. Out of the grain free breads I have experimented with in baking, this one is definately the best. The taste and texture completed my ham and cucumber sandwich.
What did I do wrong? This came out VERY moist… like a banana bread. Nothing like loaf/sandwich bread. I did end up cooking it nearly 31 minutes because pick still wasn’t coming out clean. Mine seems much darker too. I didn’t use the flax seeds (daughter has a sensory issue with nuts/seeds in breads) (You’ll notice I put sesame seeds on half for me…would that make it that much different? I used the proper size – but glass pan (all I have in loaf style) Flavor is good… but far too dense to consider using for a sandwich and not sure how Biikeweaver got 18 servings (!?) from this size loaf pan? But THANK YOU for posting. This was my FIRST attempt, so I’ll try again!
It is interesting in gluten free baking how seemingly minute changes can have a big effect on the taste, texture, consistency and rise of the finished product. I thought it was just me that had such an enhanced palate (since I have Fibromyalgia, CFS, etc) my senses and nerves are forever enhanced. In my vanilla oat banana quick bread recipe I have found that variations in the type of pan etc will change the entire finished product. I have tried it in a large loaf pan, mini loaves and muffins. This recipe which I created works best as mini loaves. Just last week I made it and I used my nutri bullet instead of my food processor to ground the oat, corn meal and corn starch flour blend I created and it made for a very fine powder. This change in the texture of of the flour gave the bread a different texture. It was a slight change that only I would have noticed but I was going crazy trying to pinpoint what made the difference. I pinpointed that in order to get the rise and texture I prefer, I need to use mini loaf pans and pulse my blend in the food processor. I feel like these variations are part of all baking but pronounced in gf baking for sure.
This recipe looks wonderful, Elana! Till now, I made an all-almond flour bread and even though it was semi-sweet and delicious, it was also dense and chunky. Just last weekend, I caught myself wondering – what if I were to add just a bit of coconut flour to create some fluffiness? And then I started fretting about the proportions and decided to sleep on it for a few nights and postpone my kitchen adventures till next weekend.

Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)
Made this today, had a couple slices for a sandwich for lunch! My add-in spices was a Mediterranean spice blend that added a nice depth. I froze the rest for future sandwich cravings… thanks for an easy recipe with everything I have on hand! Oh, and I used 3/4 cup of dehydrated almond pulp from making milk, and 1/2 cup bob’s red mill gf flour instead of all almond flour!

I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEgD1Qstko
The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBb060OPegg
According to Adrienne Rose Johnson, the idea that the primitive diet was superior to current dietary habits dates back to the 1890s with such writers as Dr. Emmet Densmore and Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. Densmore proclaimed that "bread is the staff of death," while Kellogg supported a diet of starchy and grain-based foods.[11] The idea of a Paleolithic diet can be traced to a 1975 book by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 which in 1985 was further developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his 2002 book The Paleo Diet.[8] The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[12] as is Paleo Diet, trademarked by Cordain.[13]

Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
The Hiwi gather and hunt a diverse group of plants and animals from the savannas, forests, rivers and swamps. Their main sources of meat are capybara, collared peccary, deer, anteater, armadillo, and feral cattle, numerous species of fish, and at least some turtle species. Less commonly consumed animals include iguanas and savanna lizards, wild rabbits, and many birds. Not exactly the kind of meat Paleo dieters and others in urban areas can easily obtain.

Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
my loaf is in the oven so here’s hoping it will be as good as it looks…. please amend the directions to include the addition of baking powder, chia seeds and salt. I’m assuming they come before the vinegar but the directions don’t say anything about adding them in. I didn’t notice until after the vinegar was added so I hope it still turns out. thanks Lisa

Fattening cattle with corn changes the lipid balance and is clearly not the natural diet for a grass eating cow. In Simple change in cattle diets could cut E. coli infection researchers have found that when cattle were fed hay or grass for just five days before slaughter, much less E. Coli cells were present in the animal's feces and virtually all surviving E. coli bacteria were not acid-resistant and were killed by human stomach acid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9eyUSERjrs
Hello! I was wondering if you had ever doubled or tripled the recipe in order to use a standard size loaf pan? I wasn’t paying attention to the size and made a regular recipe in a standard loaf pan and the results were, well, flat. Then I realized my goof. Hoping to avoid the purchase of another pan, but will definitely buy a new one if it means I can make this bread! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0Zz6z5GaVE
hi – thanks for the recipe…we LOVE all your recipes in your books and blogs..and we are a Paleo and dairy free..Paleo my husband and son HAS to because of dairy intolerance. I would like to mention that those following a strict Paleo diet need to omit the Flax. Flax is not a paleo ingredient as it is a cultivated grain. I have omitted the flax in your recipes when called for and you never miss it. Thanks again for all of your hardwork and recipes!!!
Thank you so much for this recipe. I have experimented with various paleo bread recipes and this one is the best, yet! Best sandwich slices. Best toast. Best warm out of the oven take to the table bread. I wasn’t sure it would rise and when it did I did the happy dance around my kitchen. FYI, I didn’t have tapioca starch so I used Trader Joe’s gluten free flour (which includes tapioca starch) as a substitute. I also lined the glass pan with parchment after I greased it. Fluffy, flavorful, delicious! Not just good paleo sandwich bread. Good bread, period.
No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy guidelines to follow to kick-start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extent you want to follow those guidelines, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.

I finally made this recipe BUT as I was about to add the water, I had a choking fit. When I finally recovered I finished adding the ingredients. The mixture looked really dry but I added it to the pan baked it. With 10 minutes left baking, I found the water on the window sill. Hmmmm, I finished baking it and tasted the biscuit like mound. I must say, it tastes delicious still. 🤗
The yeast in this low carb and keto bread ensures a wonderful texture and taste. Now, how much your bread will rise (and fall!) post-bake depends quite a bit on your altitude. But note that you still won’t get that gummy and wet texture here of most low carb breads. Plus, as mentioned, we’re baking at over 7,000 feet (Mexico City here!!), so if we can make this keto sandwich bread work so can you.

Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by William Davis, MD. A renowned cardiologist explains how eliminating wheat from our diets can prevent fat storage, shrink unsightly "wheat belly" bulges, and reverse myriad health problems, like minor rashes and high blood sugar. The author contends that every single human will experience health improvement by giving up modern wheat. The book provides readers with a user-friendly, step-by-step plan to navigate a new, wheat-free lifestyle. Informed by cutting-edge science and nutrition, along with case studies from men and women who have experienced life-changing transformations in their health after waving goodbye to wheat. The author's blog. Published August 30, 2011.
Diet has been an important part of our evolution—as it is for every species—and we have inherited many adaptations from our Paleo predecessors. Understanding how we evolved could, in principle, help us make smarter dietary choices today. But the logic behind the Paleo diet fails in several ways: by making apotheosis of one particular slice of our evolutionary history; by insisting that we are biologically identical to stone age humans; and by denying the benefits of some of our more modern methods of eating.
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ

Hi Ria! First off- coconut four will not work as a sub for arrowroot- they have completely different properties and react differently, so that’s why your bread didn’t work out. If you follow the recipe it should turn out great! I love your adventurous spirit in cooking 🙂 I would suggest making the recipe as directed for better results. About the hard bread- I have a fabulous hard crusty bread in my paleo bread ebook that fits the bill (seeds can easily be adds to it). Hope that helps! 🙂 🙂 Hard bread recipe: https://paleoglutenfree.com/shop/quick-easy-paleo-breads/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9oVDL7ACno

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