This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
I decided to make these magic little bars into paleo 7 layer bars to avoid all the refined sugar and grains that you’ll typically find in a 7 layer bar.  There was just one last question I needed to have answered: What’s the difference between magic mars and 7 layer bars???  I finally found out: NOTHING!  You could easily just call these bars 7 layer magic bars.

Hi Christy, It might be a little more difficult, but in theory possible. You’d need to stir the dry ingredients, then use a hand mixer instead of food processor to mix them with the butter. Then, after beating the egg whites separately, you’d need to mix in part of them, trying not to break them down, then fold in the rest once it’s easier to fold.

Hi Eva, That’s awesome that you are helping your son this way. I haven’t tried this with other tools, but you could probably use either the blender or the food processor. The key is to pulse in step 5, not just constantly blend, so that the whites don’t fully break down. Other than that, it should be pretty similar. As for the yolks, if you don’t want to make creme brulee, I usually just put a couple extras into an omelet (or breakfast casserole, or any other dish requiring cooked eggs) mixed with whole eggs.
Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.

Made it again to nights ago. Subsituted sour cream for the yogurt. And I had found a three pound bag of the Honeyville almond flour at Costco. (It was under S20 if I remember correctly.) The bread came out so wonderful. The flour made a huge difference. Next time I make the bread I will again separate the eggs though. I only have a loaf pan that is 9 by 5 inches so the bread does come out a little flatter than it should. Between the correct flour and fluffing the egg whites it should be very close to a regular loaf of bread.
I doubled the recipe and baked in a glass loaf pan (standard U.S. size) at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. The texture was great, but the taste was not so great…like baking soda (soapy/salty/bitter). I finally figured out that the baking soda didn’t have enough acid to react with, because I make my own raw applesauce in the Vitamix. Many prepared applesauce brands have citric acid added. I will try making this again tomorrow with the addition of a teaspoon or two of lemon juice. Hopefully that will be enough to react with the baking soda and remove the awful aftertaste. My husband didn’t care at all. He made two ham sandwiches with four slices of the bread, and then ate two more slices with jam. Half the loaf is gone already!
Hi Nancy, this recipe does not make enough batter to properly fill a full sized loaf pan. So, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
I have successfully made the Paleo bread twice & it worked out perfectly! However, when I made it recently, the edges of the bread were a gray color upon taking it out of the pan. When I sliced the bread & spread with raspberry jam (to resemble a tea cake), the jam turned blue-gray. I think it was some sort of acidic reaction. I did leave the bread in the pan for about 40 minutes after baking before releasing. Now I just remembered that I used rice vinegar (because I was out of cider). Maybe that caused the reaction? I used anodized aluminum pan by the brand “Fat Daddy.”

Exercise is a vital part of the live-by-your-genetic-code equation. Surviving in the Stone Age meant a constant on-the-go lifestyle that probably required 4,000-plus calories a day, according to David L. Katz, MD, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. Even most people who hit the gym regularly won't need to eat that many calories, but the principle of using food as fuel to exercise still stands.


I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever!
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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