Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMOjVYgYaG8
OMGee! This is fantastic! Even my husband said this bread was amazing, and he normally dislikes anything made with almond flour. The ultimate test will be son, who I still buy normal bread for, as he doesn’t have to be gluten free, like my daughter and I. I didn’t put the palm shortening in as I didn’t have any, but don’t think it really needs it. I doubled the recipe (so glad I did), and used my English muffin rings, it made 6 of them. Enough for dinner tonight and lunch for my daughter tomorrow. Can’t wait to try more of your recipes!
In fact, the health benefits of the paleo diet are unproven. "Our ancestors ate this way and didn't have many of the chronic diseases we do, but that doesn't mean the food they ate is the reason why; drawing that conclusion would be like saying we live three times longer than our Paleolithic ancestors because we eat fast food," says Christopher Ochner, MD, research associate at the New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center at St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals. Still, a handful of small studies have tried to determine if a paleo diet is a healthier diet. One small study published in the journal Diabetologia found that the diet improved blood sugar over 12 weeks compared to a Mediterranean one that allowed grains, low-fat dairy, and oils, but it's hard to say whether researchers would come to the same results in a larger study.
The best part about baking up this bread is that it makes your whole house smell like you’re making cinnamon rolls. Scratch that, the real best part is eating this bread because it tastes like you’re eating cinnamon rolls. The only difference is you won’t be eating a bunch of artificial and processed ingredients, and instead you’ll be getting nourished by foods that your body craves, like flax seed, banana, honey, and more. Here’s a bread that you can really sink your teeth into and be totally happy with what you taste.
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others.
So I’m pretty familiar with the science of baking, and I also understand there’s significant differences when omitting gluten. The recipe calls for sour cream, and vinegar, both acids that work best as leaveners when combined with baking soda, then baking powder (1 part soda 2 parts cream of tartar (another acid) and straight cream of tartar. So it calls for acid in four separate forms. In standard baking that calls for baking powder you add soda when adding additional acid such as sour cream, buttermilk etc… when a small amount of acid is added to bread dough it increases the yeasts ability to give lift by creating gluten, but to much kills the yeast entirely. So in the absence of gluten, isn’t the acid used here excessive? I wonder if a reduction would cause greater rise? What is the purpose of the baking powder combined with the yeast? Can you please explain the science behind this? P.S. the flavor of this was excellent but it didn’t rise as expected despite an excellent yeast test, fresh powder, and 1 hour in the proof box. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=og2X4Tb6LdE
Hi Maya, I have made this twice and the first was actually closer than the second! The second one was raised really well when I put the foil on for the last 10-15 mins of cook time and when I took it out 12 mins later it had completely fallen! Now it is almost wet in the center though there are air pockets in it, it’s very odd. The first loaf was pretty flat the whole time and I am pretty sure that was because I didn’t have my egg whites whipped enough but they were spot on for the second loaf. I am also thinking it might be my baking powder after reading some of the comments. I plan to try again and just use a baking soda/cream of tartar mix rather than the baking powder. Any other suggestions? Anyone? LOL!
1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJRUoKMg1MQ
The problem with substituting the eggs for something else is that the texture of your bread won’t be light and fluffy like normal wheat bread. If your son is allergic to the egg whites I would use just the yolks. But if he can’t have eggs at all, you can try using flax or chia seeds – (3 T water with 1 T ground flax seed = 1 egg). Please let me know how it goes.
I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U63RJiOS3TE
Thank you Lexi for this awesome, super quick recipe!!! I have been trying out so many different kinds of quick breads with clean ingredients and somehow they take longer. This is will our go to bread, so thank you!! I have tried them twice and both times were awesome! Second time I tried a little variation with adding some rolled oat flour and it did not change it in any noticeable manner. Apparently too much of almonds have disadvantages on the body. I will continue experimenting with adding a little bit of other flours but big THANK YOU for this easy tasty simple recipe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdlQxISNpwY
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.

The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--BtnfD9RmE
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