I made this recipe tonight – definitely the best tasting paleo bread I’ve had. The bread didn’t rise very much, so maybe I’d do a double recipe and cook longer to get bigger slices. It also turned out a little on the crumbly side – I think mine needed more liquid because the batter was fairly dry when I put it in the pan. As someone mentioned above, I also like that it’s not super eggy tasting! I gave slices to my roommates and a friend (they’re not paleo) and they both thought it was really good – which is sayin’ something! Next time I will try a few tweaks to make is sandwich suitable, but this recipe is really tasty.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.

The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.

Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU-NENNs6CY

What is the tunnel effect? A hole or a tunnel of “less-cooked” batter as I am encountering? It’s not raw enough to not eat. Just a tad denser and wetter. But it’s truly delicious. I finish it off under the broiler for 2-3 minutes other wise the too does not brown even after 30-33 minutes. Any suggestions on cooking all the way through? (Oh…I should ad that I’m using a 5×9 Pyrex for baking. That’s prolly part of the problem).

The Lazy Paleo Enthusiast's Cookbook: A Collection of Practical Recipes and Advice on How to Eat Healthy, Tasty Food While Spending as Little Time in the Kitchen as Possible by Sean Robertson. The author is a recovering vegan and in the first half of the book recounts his dietary experiences using some paleo foods to restore his health. You learn that the author's main strategy is to make food in large batches which can be reheated to provide dinners for several days running. The second half of the book contains 28 recipes. Some borderline or nonpaleo ingredients do appear, but most of the recipes are more paleo than not. Published November 15, 2011.
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ
Thank you for this amazing recipe! I didn’t have rings so I used 3 of my 4″ pyrex glass dishes to make 3 buns. I love the texture and the taste is mild. I initially made them for burger buns but now I see they can be so versatile – egg sammies, toast with jam, eggs benedict, mini pizzas, burgers, and so on. Can’t wait to make them again – this is going to be a staple in my house! Thank you!!
After making this wonderful bread half a dozen times (that’s in 10 days!) I decided to experiment. To this recipe I added a handful of each: drained and dried Calamata olives, fresh rosemary, raw pecans. I doubled the salt, at least, and sprinkled a few shakes of garlic powder into the batter. The new bread is just delicious. I just finished a piece with a smear of chèvre on it whine still warm.
This is a lovely, easy to make, dense bread. I really enjoyed it. I do not own a magic line pan but I purchased a “medium” sized bread pan and it seemed to work well. The bread may have come out a bit short though… I made this to use as sandwich bread in my son’s lunches. It is a bit denser than I was anticipating but it really tastes good. I just had a slice with jam and it’s filling too. This would be great as a sweet bread :). Thank you!

Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzWfAVhXcNs
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn1DcZKU53A
Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5]
There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TXEys0wR-E

I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.


hi – thanks for the recipe…we LOVE all your recipes in your books and blogs..and we are a Paleo and dairy free..Paleo my husband and son HAS to because of dairy intolerance. I would like to mention that those following a strict Paleo diet need to omit the Flax. Flax is not a paleo ingredient as it is a cultivated grain. I have omitted the flax in your recipes when called for and you never miss it. Thanks again for all of your hardwork and recipes!!!
We did the same thing with sunflower sead butter in paleo bread the other day. We ran out of cashew butter (as the recipe called for) and filled in the final put with sunflower seed butter. Top half of the bread turned bright green! Some in the house wouldn’t eat it, but I loved it! And it was pretty cool when we looked up why it happened. Excited to try this recipe, thanks for sharing!
This raisin bread will have you wondering if it really is Paleo, or if you’ve just cheated on your diet program. But no worries, everything checks out and you can eat this in moderation just like anything else dubbed acceptable. With ingredients like sweet potatoes, coconut flour, eggs, butter, and raisins, how can you go wrong? She’s managed to exclude all of the things that give the body a hard time in regards to digesting and processing, and replaced them with items that are known to be easy to digest and absorb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIR_wKNQIYs
I would first like to thank you so very much for your recipes, research and website…I Love them all!! I make your paleo bread every week and have been substituting egg whites for the eggs and I notice that my bread always has a crack in the center. It could be the oven, I’m not sure, but I really like the way it turns out with the egg whites. I make a double batch and bake it in a big bread pan so it is more like a loaf of sandwich bread. Thanks again for all you do
Well my Bread wasn’t tall enough for say sandwich stuff, and I am not sure if I did anything wrong, I know I used the wrong sized bread pan so that is one thing. However, I couldn’t believe how great it tasted, it was more like a moist custard shortbread. The texture and color were perfect. I cut some thick slices and buttered both sides cooked them in a pan. I spread some sugar-free preserves on top, wow is that good. I may not have made it as intended but I can’t complain. The flavor is amazing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TluCTt_tjBY
My substitutions were coconut flour instead of arrowroot and honey for maple syrup AND regular gluten free flour instead of almond flour….some almond flour but not all. I also used 3 large eggs instead of 4 medium ones. With saying all of that I had to put more liquid in..it was too dense. Coconut flour needs more liquid. The bread tastes great but it’s too dense and didn’the rIse enough. Did the maple syrup vs honey or lack of one egg have anything to do with that density? I also don’the like the sweet taste in bread. Don’t eat any sugar so I am probably super sensitive to that taste. Your thoughts on the density, not rising enough and 3 large eggs vs 4 medium ones, in terms of making the bread rise more? Also would like a harder seeded bread. Do u have a recipe for that? I like hard breads. The taste is very good but not for breakfast or sandwiches. Not for me at any rate. Any suggestions? Thanks for ur help!
I made the original version a while back and had the unfortunate “tunneling” effect that other people mentioned. The bread that did bake all the way through was delicious though so I tried again with the modified version. That took about 45 minutes total to bake but was cooked all the way through! And it’s just as delicious as the original! Had a couple slices tonight with some beef stew. Can’t wait to have some for breakfast tomorrow!
An Interview with Ward Nicholson now has three parts on the web. Good overview of man's diet over the past 65 million years. Long but highly recommended reading. First published in Chet Day's "Health & Beyond" newsletter. Now part of a very comprehensive Beyond Vegetarianism site. Every argument that your vegetarian friends use to avoid meat for health reasons is debunked here.
To determine the diet rankings, US News & World Report selected a 25-person expert panel from the country's top dietitians, dietary consultants, and physicians specializing in diabetes, heart health, and weight loss. The panel included Lisa Sasson, MS, RDN, CDN, a clinical assistant professor and dietetic internship director in the department of nutrition and food studies at New York University; Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, CHWC, FAND, a nutrition and diabetes expert; and David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, FACLM, founding director of Yale University's Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and founder of the True Health Initiative.4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_Cd76HjNHI
×