The Garden of Eating: A Produce-Dominated Diet & Cookbook by Rachel Albert-Matesz and Don Matesz presents evidence for a diet of vegetables, fruits, and pasture-fed animal products. Provides a practical plan and 250 delicious, family-friendly, grain- and dairy-free recipes. Buy from the author's page The Garden of Eating. Rachel's blog The Healthy Cooking Coach. The cookbook maintains a perfect rating at Amazon.
Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for?
By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDWirPJv8Qg
The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. The nutrient carnitine is abundant in red meat. According to Crayhon carnitine helps balance blood lipids and blood sugar levels, maximizes energy levels, increases endurance, eliminates discomfort in ketosis, promotes burning of fat and building of muscle and increases overall well-being. See reviews at Amazon.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KQgyfPixmw

I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEgD1Qstko
It sounds like Weevils. They make cobwebs in flour and flour baked goods and were the bane of the Sailors on long voyages for centuries. I have found using a large lidded container, plastic, metal, ceramic or whatever you have, and sprinkling Diatomaceous Earth inside and round the lid keeps all my different flours healthy and hygienic. Diatomaceous Earth is a natural silica like powder which can even be taken internally, and totally dehydrates any bugs etc leaving them very dead. I use it in my chicken run and even on my cats and in their food. It keeps them healthy and parasite free. It is a sustainable, non chemical product – just check its Food grade before buying it. I guess they seell it in the US. It’s used a lot here in the UK.

Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes expounds on his 2002 article in the NY Times (What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?) and then in Science Magazine (see below). He shows how public health data has been misinterpreted to mark dietary fat and cholesterol as the primary causes of coronary heart disease. Deeper examination, he says, shows that heart disease and other diseases of civilization appear to result from increased consumption of refined carbohydrates: sugar, white flour and white rice. Or in other words, without using the word Paleolithic, he justifies the paleo diet. Here is an excellent chapter by chapter summary of the book [archive.org].


I went gluten-free in 1998, when I was diagnosed with celiac disease. The gluten-free diet did not get the job done and my gut was still cranky. So, in 2001 I went on the paleo diet. Since then, I’ve been both gluten and grain-free, and written a ton of paleo bread recipes. All of my bread recipes are quick breads, and they’re far more nutritious, low-carb, and easy to make than regular bread. I’ve tested all of these recipes several dozen times to perfect them for you.

Slight changes I had to make: pumpkin puree in place of the applesauce (1:1), a whoopie pie pan in place of the ring molds, and I baked for 12 minutes instead of 15. The pan yielded 8 “rolls” which I sliced *very* thinly to make some jam and nut butter sandwiches. Delicious! Thanks so much for the recipe! (I found this recipe via Pinterest, by the way.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlAiM0E68Oc
The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites.
Hi Solange, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
I just made this today, and my husband, toddler, and I all loved it! We used ours for cheese and tomato sandwiches, and my husband managed to eat about half of the loaf before it even cooled. Like another person mentioned, I had to bake mine longer, but for me it was nearly twice as long (I’m at a relatively high altitude, maybe that’s why?). As yet another person said, it will now be a staple in our home too!

Introduction         Unless you are involved in the culinary arts or the meat industry, you probably haven’t given much thought to the term, “Saint Louis Style Pork Ribs”.   Is this dish some kind of specially spiced, spare rib recipe from St. Louis, MO?  Did it originate in a colorful Saint Louis, 20th century restaurant, or maybe it was first served at a St. Louis Cardinal baseball game in the 1930s?   All three hypotheses...
I’ve been following your blog for a long time, I eat since seven years organic and gluten free (brown rice, millet, buckwheat). I have fibromyalgia and have no sugar, cereals and milk. For a year, I do still suffer from a fungus in my gut, so I want to try the paleo diet, so no more grain! I have some of your recepies tried and what are they delicious, never thought that the bread would be so nice! Even better than brown rice and buckwheat! My English is not so good, but wanted to let you know that I love your recipes and I occasionally make a link on my blog for you!
Transfer bread dough to prepared loaf pan, using a wet spatula to even out the top. Cover with a kitchen towel and place in a warm draft-free space for 50-60 minutes until the dough has risen just past the top of the loaf pan. How long it takes depends on your altitude, temperature and humidity- so keep an eye out for it every 15 minutes or so. And keep in mind that if you use a larger loaf pan it won't rise past the top. 
Thanks Kaylie. I used the ingredients I had at hand so that is why I did what I did. Can I eliminate the maple syrup without loosing something? Don’t like the sweet taste. I will try the other recipe first and let you know how I make out. Thanks for getting back to me. We need everyone’s expertise. Glad you like my adventurous spirit….making mistakes is just so much fun!!! :^)
I want to marry you because of this recipe (okay, maybe a tad dramatic). I only had tapioca starch so made it according to your instructions and subbed the flaxseed meal for chia because that was all I had but this bread turned out perfectly. I’m not exactly paleo and I’m generally a good cook, bad baker but this worked even for the inept baker like me. Thank you so much! Next time, I think I’ll try topping it with sunflower seeds just for an extra bite!
Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier.
I found this recipe after buying Paleo Bread at Wholefoods. It was SO bad that it drove me to find a good recipe to make my own. When I read the review that it wasn’t too eggy, I was sold. I am not a huge fan of eggs (too bad for someone attempting a primal diet) so I was set to try this. I followed the directions exactly…even taking extra time to beat the eggs. I used the yoghurt instead of coconut cream. It came out perfect. Thank you for making something edible and still Paleo. I tried to give this recipe 5 stars but it’s having a glitch and won’t let me. 5 stars!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czd0Er-_qI8
These researchers point out that there are plenty of reasons to suggest that the low-fat-is-good-health hypothesis has now effectively failed the test of time. In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980’s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iByLhzowRl0
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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