How inventive!! Elana, we would love for you to share this wonderful recipe with our community since I know our Paleo/Primal friends will just love this. If you’re interested, please take a minute to submit the recipe at fastpaleo.com/upload-a-recipe/. Feel free to plug your blog at the beginning of the directions section, and we’re more than happy to give your Facebook page a shoutout when we post it! This is exactly the kind of delicious and healthy recipe people are asking for!

#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ

Grains and legumes (or pulses) are other groups that are frowned upon in the diet. "The right grains in the right amount can actually curtail inflammation," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN, creator of the blog Better Than Dieting and author of Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You From Label To Table. In addition, fiber-rich legumes, including beans, lentils, and peas, have been consistently linked with reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. "Fiber-rich carbs can supply energy, fiber, a host of vitamins and minerals, and a soothing satisfaction that could keep us from eating less nutritionally dense choices," Taub-Dix says. With the rise in popularity of ancient grains such as amaranth, millet, oats, and teff, and pulses, such as chickpeas and lentils, there's much opportunity to access versatile, naturally delicious whole grains and legumes that our ancestors ate. "Carbohydrates have a bad reputation, justified by the company they often keep, such as rich sauces and butter, and the forms in which they may be served (eg, donuts and pastries)," Taub-Dix says, "but the right carbs can save us from degenerative diseases."
I made this recipe tonight – definitely the best tasting paleo bread I’ve had. The bread didn’t rise very much, so maybe I’d do a double recipe and cook longer to get bigger slices. It also turned out a little on the crumbly side – I think mine needed more liquid because the batter was fairly dry when I put it in the pan. As someone mentioned above, I also like that it’s not super eggy tasting! I gave slices to my roommates and a friend (they’re not paleo) and they both thought it was really good – which is sayin’ something! Next time I will try a few tweaks to make is sandwich suitable, but this recipe is really tasty.
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
I am 77 autoimmune celiac. for two years I have been strictly grain free and diary free, salt free,eat no added sugar, all organic, no processed foods. I walk and walk and walk some more, garden and have no other health issues. I weigh now what I weighed at 27 after having had 4 babies. 133 pounds. I kept off a 65 pound weight loss easily and happily. I all back to the land for years and years and raised my own grain milled or ground it up and baked my own bread and made my own cheese from milk from my own goats and cows. So I know good and healthy. I would rather have the energy and brains I have now than go back to eating grain and dairy. I still make my own ‘cheese’ from nonfat yogurt.
For instance, the fat allowance of the diet may be problematic. “My biggest hang-up with the paleo diet is all of the saturated fats it promotes with all of the meats,” explains Holley, noting that you could look for a locally sourced meat, whose origin and method of raising you're aware of, as a healthier option. Saturated fat from meat has been linked with an increased risk of early death. (9)
Primal Body-Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life by Nora Gedgaudas advocates a diet that our paleo ancestors ate. Meat, lots of fat, and seasonal fruits and berries when available. Basically, sugar and starchy carbs are discouraged. You can download a chapter from the author's site. She has a Primal Body, Primal Mind Radio weekly show on Voice of America. It started May 20, 2009, so there are many shows you can listen to. Published June 30, 2011.
I didn’t measure my pan but when I baked this bread it was a bit flat also, so I cut the loaf in half, and then sliced each half into bread sized pieces. It worked perfectly for full sized pieces that looked like ‘normal’ bread. I cannot get over how easy and delicious this bread is. My sweet son can have no grains, and no honey….so I left out the honey and added 1 tsp of xylitol. So so good. And this morning when I toasted a piece for him, he thought I made a mistake and gave him ‘real’ bread!
I buy whole golden flax seeds. I grind them very fine to use them so my flax seed meal is always fresh and not rancid. I have never tried it in bread so am going to give it a shot with this recipe. Hope it turns out. There are so many glowing comments for this bread. I don’t eat grains and usually just use cloud bread which I love but my grandchildren would prefer a “slice” of bread. Do you think this would turn out in a pullman pan?
I’m a big fan of yours and have, over the five years since our family went gluten-free/Paleo, used many of your recipes with great success, especially those for the Jewish holidays. Our recent discovery was your chocolate hamentaschen recipe (https://elanaspantry.com/chocolate-raspberry-hamantaschen/) – which was very well received by our family, our synagogue (and not just the other GF individuals), and most of the kids in both girls’ school classes. And it really was so easy to make, which I especially appreciated, since we always make a lot to share!
Sweden's Staffan Lindeberg has a home page Paleolithic Diet in Medical Nutrition [archive.org]. A recent study of Staffan's has A Paleolithic diet improving glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Also see his first web page, an overview of his Kitava study: On the Benefits of Ancient Diets. Now he has a book Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Here's a book review: Easy to Read, Informative, Packed with Footnotes on Studies.
I pinned your first roll recipe, but when I tried to go back to it – had disappeared. So because I make it often, repinned it. I noticed this time palm oil had been removed. I always used coconut oil instead. Anyway – just wondered why and if there is a difference in texture? I went ahead and added coconut oil because I’ve been so happy with the way I’ve been making them. (They slide out of pan which I like, with oil) One of my favorite and go to recipes – the only bread I eat. Thanks. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qva9DSyAst4
Just tasted this….excellent. Much fluffier than 2.0, though similar in flavor. I used coconut palm sugar syrup (boiled 1/2c water, added 1c organic coconut palm sugar, reduced heat for 3 min until dissolved, let cool before using, store in mason jar in fridge) which I use to replace any sweetener in baking…agave, honey, etc. Worked great in this as well. So moist too. Awesome texture! Thanks Elana!

Like other fad diets, the Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the Paleo diet can lead to an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10]

This easy Paleo Bread recipe tastes great and is made with just 7 nutrient dense ingredients. That’s a good thing because “gluten-free” isn’t necessarily healthy, especially when it comes to bread. That’s why I created a gluten-free paleo bread recipe that’s made of high-protein ingredients that won’t leave you dragging. I’m loving every slice that comes from this new paleo diet friendly bread recipe.


Making this homemade bread is easy and kid-friendly! Paleo bread is different from gluten free bread because often on the paleo diet most grains are avoided. So gluten-free breads made with gluten-free flours like rice flour, teff flour, and corn meal would not be considered paleo bread! I like using this  combination of almond flour and tapioca flour as it creates the most legit paleo bread, and gluten-free I’ve ever tried!
Pros – I basically threw this together while two toddlers screamed for my attention (I have no idea what got into them today). My almond flour was clumpy and I didn’t know how to fix it (first time baking with it), I don’t have a mixer so I used a whisk, and I forgot the ground flax until after it was in the pan and had to take the batter out and add it. Yet it turned out. And it tastes great, and it slices! I used the 4 eggs, 1 tsp baking soda and 35 min comment as a guide.
Paul Burke's Neo-Dieter's Handbook: When We Lost Our Nutritional Roots; Where to Find These Foods Today by Paul Burke M. Ed. The book focuses on nutrition, the right nutrition to enhance health, exercise, weight training, and fitness. The diet consists of lean protein, vegetables, nuts, and fruit. He is opposed to grains. He wants you to stay away from grain-fed meat. The single review at Amazon.com gives the book 5 stars. Published August 21, 2009.
As a follow up to my post a few days ago about the ammonia smell after I slice the bread…..someone mentioned it could be the flax. So I baked a loaf and substituted chia for the flax, and still got the ammonia smell. I am wondering if there is some kind of chemical reaction taking place? And if so, I would assume this is not safe to eat? Is it the baking soda? Or apple cider vinegar? I don’t want to keep using up all my almond flour (I use Trader Joe’s), so if someone has any insight I would love to hear. Thanks

I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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