Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz's work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz's 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet

I’ve just mixed the bread following the useful metric recipe, as I’m English. I’ve put it in the oven, looking forward to trying it.Howver, I am not allowed gluten on the Candida diet, but I’m not allowed honey or vinegar either! Didn’t dare omit them this time in case they were essential and the ingredients are very expensive. Is it OK to leave them out (particularly the honey)? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaHGpOoBt0k
Oh, and by the way, I made the original recipe by mistake and it’s been wonderful! I have varied it to use 1C of almond flour, and the rest is coconut flour, and I accidentally left out the sea salt the first time, and it was great regardless! I hate salt anyways, but so far the original recipe works fine, and no tunnels in the middle. I did use the correct size pan as recommended, but I lined it.
Having made the previous version of this recipe scores of times there was a reluctance to change but I had chia seeds and psyllium laying around from other experiments so decided to try this one. I thought maybe the lack of. Baking soda was a mistake and saw a comment about adding a half tspn. So, with that mod and 1/3 cup of walnuts and cranberries and a tspn of cinnamon and coconut sugar I made this today. Wow! Much moister and more flavorful than the other version. Angela – you hit a home run with this.
Love this bread only bread other then what I make at home I can eat. I have celiac disease, and Ulcerative Colitis, I have a allergy to corn, intolerance to carbs, yeast, soy, dairy, among a few other things. Julian Bakery Almond Bread is a life saver, reminds me of whole grain bread from my child hood. I love to put nutivia butter flavored coconut oil on it and toast it with cinnamon. IT does have to be toasted to hold up well but raw I like to use it to scramble in with eggs sometimes. Toasted it is great with almond butter and sugar free jam, avacado and eggs, bit of avacado mayo, and what ever else you wish. I find they work better as open sandwiches, then a true sandwich. Other thoughts try topping them with a paleo cheese after toasting and slowly warm it up to melt it on (Julian paleo cheese can take a bit to melt so low and slow as to not burn it) and it makes a lovely cheesy bread. One of my oddest and favorite things is a bit of nutiva butter flavored coconut oil and some caraway seeds as this makes it taste like a rye bread I use to eat as a child before my diagnosis.
Cynthia Graber is the co-host of Gastropod and is an award-winning radio and print journalist who covers science and technology, agriculture and food, distant lands, and any other stories that catch her fancy. Her work has been featured in Fast Company, Slate, the Boston Globe, Scientific American, the BBC, and a variety of other magazines, radio shows, and podcasts.
But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2wGrYngpJ0
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2upizqKg7cY
wow, I have tried to make a good gluten free bread for about a year and this tops all of the recipes I’ve tried. I have to agree with the comment that most gluten-free/grain-free breads are eggy … this one is not and it tastes great. I just enjoyed a piece with boursin tomato pesto. Thank you for the great recipe. I will be trying many more of your recipes.
Thank you so much for what you are doing! I’m making my second loaf now and my family enjoyed the first one immensely. I finally was able to enjoy a poached egg on toast again. Your recipes are so easy to follow, and even substitute with. For instance I just finished baking up a ton of your “thin mints”, and was low on Almond Flour, so I just threw in what I had, about a cup, and then added a half a cup of raw Pecans to the food processor and continued as directed on the recipe. It was perfect. So since I love to experiment, I’m making my second loaf with walnuts instead of pecans. It’s rising and looking beautiful. I can’t wait to try it.
This was my first foray into paleo breadmaking (and eating). DELICIOUS! I had to leave the room or else I would have eaten the whole loaf. I’m experimenting with recipes to try and find a GF sandwich bread that my kids will like. I’m going to make this again but will either use the coconut cream or use sweetened yogurt or add honey to make it a little sweeter. I’m also thinking about making it in a tin can so I can cut it into round slices.
Bread was phenomenal!! I followed the recipe exactly, I had a bread pan that was about an inch wider than yours but bread still rose. Looks great, looks just like a loaf of banana bread! The bread is very buttery in flavor, I can’t have more than one slice it’s pretty rich. It’s a dense bread like banana bread. I was SO excited when I pulled it out of the oven and it looked and tasted good I did a little “I made BREAD!” dance. Alas, bread, I have missed you… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSrH4elI5uc
The best part about baking up this bread is that it makes your whole house smell like you’re making cinnamon rolls. Scratch that, the real best part is eating this bread because it tastes like you’re eating cinnamon rolls. The only difference is you won’t be eating a bunch of artificial and processed ingredients, and instead you’ll be getting nourished by foods that your body craves, like flax seed, banana, honey, and more. Here’s a bread that you can really sink your teeth into and be totally happy with what you taste.
Stacey thank you for that, I am trying out keto stuffing for Thanksgiving. Paola thank you for this recipe. I have made it twice. First time was a bit slimy as I didn’t grind my flours (lesson learned). 2nd one was perfection. My bread rises wonderfully. I put it out in my garage or on my back porch to rise…of course Yuma Arizona gives me a warmth advantage. Not sure how it will work in winter.
We’re loving the taste and texture of this–but like a few others, I came out with a dense. flat loaf (only about 1 1/2″ high). The liquid mixture seemed very thick, and the combined batter was almost a dough going into the pan, not exactly pourable. I know some almond flours behave differently; I used Bob’s Red Mill (only thing readily available here), if that makes a difference.
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
OMG-made this recipe for fun(I have no dietary restricions about gluten or grains or any allergies) Followed recipe exactly and used three 4″mini springform pans. These buns came out awesome! Texture and taste like real actual bread! Eating one wih chicken salad as I type! I’ve tried other bread recipes before using almond or coconut flours and never came out worthy of the effort and cost involved but these are amazing! I love that it is a small batch using simple minimal ingredients so u dont end up with a ton of something u can’t eat fast enough before it goes bad(not that these would even last that long if I quadrupled the recipe…!)
The final benefit we’ll discuss is a balanced dietary alkaline load. While this concept sounds complex, it’s actually quite simple: after digestion, all foods present either a net acid or alkaline load to the kidneys. Meats, fish, grains, legumes, cheese, and salt all produce acids, while Paleo-approved fruits and vegetables yield alkalines. A lifetime of excessive dietary acid may promote bone and muscle loss, high blood pressure, an increased risk for kidney stones, and may aggravate asthma and exercise-induced asthma. The Paleo diet seeks to reduce the risk of chronic disease by emphasising a balanced alkaline load.

Lexi! I just made this recipe for the first time yesterday to eat alongside our burgers – and they were PERFECT. Great consistency, nice flavor and best of all – the rolls retained their shape and didn’t rip like most buns do while eating the burgers. My husband loved them! We plan on making these on the regular. Thanks so much for creating/sharing this!
They go through a virtual checklist on what makes a bread a bread, and it’s pretty much right on. You want your bread to be able to toast up in the toaster, to have a crust on the outside but be soft on the inside, and to slice up without giving you too many problems. The reason this becomes important to consider is because many breads that try to cut out wheat and up falling short of many of these requirements. But this bread is up to the challenge and can be that go-to bread recipe you’ll need while going with the Paleo lifestyle.
Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.
Traditional lemon bars are so good, but that sugar high comes with a subsequent crash. That’s not the case with this Paleo-friendly version. Using honey instead of refined sugar keeps things sweet without throwing your blood sugar out of whack, while using coconut flour in the crust makes it perfectly crunchy. Make an extra batch because these will go quickly.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.
Hi Elana…I did this with your bread and it was ridiculously tasty!!! Herb roasted tomatoes on top of your Paleo bread spread with a little leftover chevre that I’d rolled in some Creole seasoning. I LOVE this bread (well, and all of your recipes really)!!! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/holly.oleary.14/posts/10204240445388312?comment_id=10204240832958001&offset=0&total_comments=8
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube.
Cynthia Graber is the co-host of Gastropod and is an award-winning radio and print journalist who covers science and technology, agriculture and food, distant lands, and any other stories that catch her fancy. Her work has been featured in Fast Company, Slate, the Boston Globe, Scientific American, the BBC, and a variety of other magazines, radio shows, and podcasts.

The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrpA7FjV8w4
Wow !! This is my third try at Paleo bread recipe and definitely the best.I substituted one table spoon chia seeds(made it into a slurry first) for one egg as I was afraid the bread would be too eggy and my husband wouldn’t like it.It’s cooling on the counter and I just had to take a slice because it looks so perfect….delish !!Thanks so much for sharing this recipe.I’ll be enjoying bread regularly now.
Hi Laura, can your husband have cashews? You could try making it with cashew flour. Also, some people like substituting almond flour for pumpkin seed flour, or a gluten free oat flour. These may also work, but will give the bread a unique taste and texture. Happy to hear you’re not giving up and you want to try making another bread recipe 🙂 Please let me know how it goes.
With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.

This is one of the best gluten-free bread recipes I’ve tried. I made mine in a 9 x 5 loaf pan. It’s a little vertically challenged, but it still tastes good and has a nice texture to it. I’m a recovering carb-junkie who realized the one thing I craved most was likely a factor in decades worth of digestive grief. As an experiment, I eliminated wheat products from my diet and my digestive health has shown significant improvement. But I have so missed my morning toast with peanut butter. This bread is a great replacement, one that’s both tasty and nutritious (unlike store bought GF bread). It’s delicious with peanut butter, jam, butter, or just on its own. Thank you for the wonderful recipe!
I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BiHLAQTZvI
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