These researchers point out that there are plenty of reasons to suggest that the low-fat-is-good-health hypothesis has now effectively failed the test of time. In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980’s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.)

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The Paleo diet is based upon everyday, modern foods that mimic the food groups of our pre-agricultural, hunter-gatherer ancestors. Though there are numerous benefits eating a hunter-gatherer diet, there are seven fundamental characteristics of hunter-gatherer diets that help to optimize your health, minimize your risk of chronic disease, and to lose weight and keep it off.
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue.
For those who were considering ordering Paleo bread from the Julian Bakery online, just a word of caution: beware! The bad reviews are really true, and I’m not one who usually does any online reviews. I have ordered both the almond and the coconut breads for awhile. I am not sure what to make of the taste of them, but the almond is definitely a no-go for me. The coconut was palatable, if you chug down some liquid with it and pretend you’re not about to choke! It’s gagging, tasteless, and soggy-at-times bread, but I guess I was desperate for a slice, truly desperate to think it was edible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDoRiF8zj5Y
Thank you so much for this recipe. I have experimented with various paleo bread recipes and this one is the best, yet! Best sandwich slices. Best toast. Best warm out of the oven take to the table bread. I wasn’t sure it would rise and when it did I did the happy dance around my kitchen. FYI, I didn’t have tapioca starch so I used Trader Joe’s gluten free flour (which includes tapioca starch) as a substitute. I also lined the glass pan with parchment after I greased it. Fluffy, flavorful, delicious! Not just good paleo sandwich bread. Good bread, period.
Thank you so much! This was delicious, didn’t crumble and fall apart like most g.f. breads. I brought it to my Bible Study group, one gal is on the Paleo diet and I am gluten free, two gals can eat anything. They all loved it. It is so easy to make, again, thank you so much for posting. I’ve already shared the recipe with two of the gals in the group. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrjjJnfLxC0
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube.
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.

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Thanks for taking the time to post the Metric measures Pat. I’ve just made my first loaf, which is ok but I misread the ingredients and only put 1/2 tsp of baking powder in the mix ..duh! There’s another one baking right now with the correct amount in . Really looking forward to it. I’m going to slice it up and freeze it in portions so I can take out what I need and toast it. The only downside for me is the almond flour and coconut flour is very expensive in the uk. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSGRd5Ve1zI
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Once your yeast is proofed, add in the egg, egg whites, lightly cooled melted butter (you don't want to scramble the eggs or kill the yeast!) and vinegar. Mix with an electric mixer for a couple minutes until light and frothy. Add the flour mixture in two batches, alternating with the sour cream, and mixing until thoroughly incorporated. You want to mix thoroughly and quickly to activate the xanthan gum, though the dough will become thick as the flours absorb the moisture. 
Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N80LZL2vw3A

Wow! Thank you, thank you thank you! I’ve been paleo for 2 months- already dropped a dress size (back to my usual size) and feel more energetic, despite numerous health problems- have tried other paleo ‘bread’ recepie’s but they have all been variations of ‘omelette’ . I read these ingredients with eager anticipitation and…… Despite already trying 5 shops for Arrowroot powder, steeled myself for further search. Shop 7 I found it. It came In a pack of 6 x sachets of 1 tablespoon each serving. Have to say when I tipped them all in it was slightly under the amount required and I was worried the slightly less amount would have a detrimental effect..BUT…all other ingredients I followed to the exact recipe…. I lined my loaf tin with baking paper and prayed for success…….I got it out after 25 mins….put it back in……35 mins….. Back in….45 mins…..back in……by 55 mins the top was pretty brown so I covered it in foil ….and put it back in….. After 75 mins the tooth pick was still showing moist after sticking it in the middle so I took the whole loaf out, took it out of the the tin and paper and put it in- upside down- back in the tin for another 15 mins. The loaf stuck horribly to the paper. Couldn’t understand why but, whilst the loaf cooked upside down, I enjoyed peeling the stuck bits off the paper and eating them- delicious. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wG3b3ql34A
Hi Christy, It might be a little more difficult, but in theory possible. You’d need to stir the dry ingredients, then use a hand mixer instead of food processor to mix them with the butter. Then, after beating the egg whites separately, you’d need to mix in part of them, trying not to break them down, then fold in the rest once it’s easier to fold.

Anna are you saying even though you omitted the almond butter and just made the bread with the rest of the ingredients it was exactly as if the almond butte was in the recipe. Was there any difference at all like holding together as well, or maybe it did not rise as much, etc. Can you please explain what was different and which was was better in taste and texture and rising, etc. Thanks

This is the third time I have made this bread. The first time I followed you directions and discovered the middle wasn’t quite baked all the way through. So I read some of the comments and tried it again. The second time I kept the oven temp the same and cut down on the butter and baked it for about 40-45 minutes. It turned out fine then. However it doesn’t that size of a loaf doesn’t last long in our house. So today I made it again and increased the recipe by half. I had bought a 12″ x 4.5″ x 3 ” bread loaf pan. I used 7 tbsp of Kerry Gold butter instead of 9 tbsp. Otherwise the rest was the same. I baked it at 355 degrees for 1 hour. It turned out perfectly. I couldn’t wait to let it cool too much. I love warm bread and just had to have a couple of slices. Btw- the organic almond flour I used was from our local grocery store health market section.
I am so looking for breads that work……….this does not……I have your books………..but the question about the ammonia…….they are an in your face issue…………for me, not till I sliced the loaf……but my nose is very sensitive….and I taste the amonia without ingesting the product…………my Mum, who has no sense of smell left, loved it…….. time to keep trying…………I am borderline diabetic, mum is, and my lover is in denial……………..so looking for something that passes as ‘bread’…………..thanks for the help………….luckylin……….
Despite the fact the Paleo diet eliminates food groups vital to health, Katz believes the eating pattern has some merit. "Every species on the planet does well on the diet which it natively adapted. And the idea that things would be different for our species is absurd. There is some modern science to show its benefits, but with limitations. Those limitations include what it is compared to (everything is better than the typical American diet), and how genuinely 'Paleo' it really is," adding that there's a big difference between what meat enthusiasts casually call "Paleo" and legitimate Stone Age Homo sapiens eating patterns, which by today's standards would make a huge negative impact on the environment. "To procure the wild plants and animals required for sustenance depends on a lot of space per person," Katz says. "I have done the math, and for the current human population to eat that way would require about 15 times the surface area of the planet. Eight billion Homo sapiens cannot be foragers, or substantially carnivorous, without decimating the planet."
Hi Slee, there are many variations of the Paleo diet and many people do eat dairy for it’s health benefits. This isn’t a diet, but more of a guide to help people with different goals and health problems. We focus on eliminating processed foods and those that cause inflammation, and we focus on eating nutrient-dense foods. So although it’s true that some of the enzymes in the yogurt die during baking at certain temperatures, we are still training our minds to look for nutritions foods. This is especially important for people starting out with this way of eating and living.
Drop Grok into the Hiwi's midst—or indeed among any modern or ancient hunter–gather society—and he would be a complete aberration. Grok cannot teach us how to live or eat; he never existed. Living off the land or restricting oneself to foods available before agriculture and industry does not guarantee good health. The human body is not simply a collection of adaptations to life in the Paleolithic—its legacy is far greater. Each of us is a dynamic assemblage of inherited traits that have been tweaked, transformed, lost and regained since the beginning of life itself. Such changes have not ceased in the past 10,000 years.
Most nutritionists consent that the Paleo diet gets at least one thing right—cutting down on processed foods that have been highly modified from their raw state through various methods of preservation. Examples include white bread and other refined flour products, artificial cheese, certain cold cuts and packaged meats, potato chips, and sugary cereals. Such processed foods often offer less protein, fiber and iron than their unprocessed equivalents, and some are packed with sodium and preservatives that may increase the risk of heart disease and certain cancers.
The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c
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