Thank you so much for this recipe! I had some with my egg for breakfast and it went really well as the bread has a slightly ‘eggy’ taste. It came out exactly as your photo. Some people asked for nutrition info and I have looked at just the calories and protein which are 1096 calories per loaf and 101g protein. Obviously the slice amounts vary on how many slices you cut it into – for me 14 slices so 113 calories and 7g protein per slice.


The best part about baking up this bread is that it makes your whole house smell like you’re making cinnamon rolls. Scratch that, the real best part is eating this bread because it tastes like you’re eating cinnamon rolls. The only difference is you won’t be eating a bunch of artificial and processed ingredients, and instead you’ll be getting nourished by foods that your body craves, like flax seed, banana, honey, and more. Here’s a bread that you can really sink your teeth into and be totally happy with what you taste.
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0TMQ87vA9E
Made it last night and my husband & I ate the whole loaf! I used olive oil instead of palm oil, and I used arrowroot instead of tapioca flour. Also, I baked for 22min in a mini-loaf pan and let it cool for 15-20min before slicing. I got 8 small slices and they were delicious! Very fluffy and raised nicely during baking. The texture was extremely fluffy and just like any sandwich roll as you’d expect.
Hi Elana…I did this with your bread and it was ridiculously tasty!!! Herb roasted tomatoes on top of your Paleo bread spread with a little leftover chevre that I’d rolled in some Creole seasoning. I LOVE this bread (well, and all of your recipes really)!!! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/holly.oleary.14/posts/10204240445388312?comment_id=10204240832958001&offset=0&total_comments=8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuaUI30NR5E
I wrote a book called The Paleo Solution which went on to become a New York Times Bestseller. This book incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology to help you look, feel and perform your best. I am a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat and pocket protector for a whistle and a stopwatch to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world. With my unique perspective as both scientist and coach you will learn how simple nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can radically change your appearance and health for the better.
Almond flour is often considered the “all purpose” flour of the paleo baking world. It’s used to make things like bread, cakes, and cookies with good results. The only caveat I have is that using almond flour alone can result in a dense baked good, so I typically use almond flour (or almond meal) in conjunction with arrowroot starch, tapioca flour, and/or flaxseed meal to lighten up the texture.
You don’t often equate coconuts as being savory, but there are a few things in play here that get this to work. The use of coconut flour replaces the typical wheat-based flour used in most store bought bread. The savory comes from a combination of flax meal, sea salt, and olive oil. Coconut flour provides the right texture and helps this taste like a bread, and is one of the more popular flours used in Paleo baking because it has more of a light and airy taste and feel to it. Since it is derived from coconuts no grains are harmed in the process.

The evolutionary discordance is incomplete, since it is based mainly on the genetic understanding of the human diet and a unique model of human ancestral diets, without taking into account the flexibility and variability of the human dietary behaviors over time.[27] Studies of a variety of populations around the world show that humans can live healthily with a wide variety of diets, and that in fact, humans have evolved to be flexible eaters.[28] Lactose tolerance is an example of how some humans have adapted to the introduction of dairy into their diet. While the introduction of grains, dairy, and legumes during the Neolithic revolution may have had some adverse effects on modern humans, if humans had not been nutritionally adaptable, these technological developments would have been dropped.[29]

Hi Claudia, unfortunately, more almond butter won’t thicken the bars the way that coconut flour will. You *might* be able to use almond flour, but proceed with caution since almond flour is MUCH less absorbent than coconut flour. Start with 3/4 cup almond flour and experiment until you get the consistency you like (basically, they should be thick and dense enough to cut through.) So sorry to hear about your possible allergy to coconut. 🙁 Big hugs. xo


OMG-made this recipe for fun(I have no dietary restricions about gluten or grains or any allergies) Followed recipe exactly and used three 4″mini springform pans. These buns came out awesome! Texture and taste like real actual bread! Eating one wih chicken salad as I type! I’ve tried other bread recipes before using almond or coconut flours and never came out worthy of the effort and cost involved but these are amazing! I love that it is a small batch using simple minimal ingredients so u dont end up with a ton of something u can’t eat fast enough before it goes bad(not that these would even last that long if I quadrupled the recipe…!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urGzfAW70PY
Once your yeast is proofed, add in the egg, egg whites, lightly cooled melted butter (you don't want to scramble the eggs or kill the yeast!) and vinegar. Mix with an electric mixer for a couple minutes until light and frothy. Add the flour mixture in two batches, alternating with the sour cream, and mixing until thoroughly incorporated. You want to mix thoroughly and quickly to activate the xanthan gum, though the dough will become thick as the flours absorb the moisture. 
I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.

Hi Elana! Love this bread…have been making it for a couple of months now. Only one problem: I keep getting these cobwebs in the bread. It appears after a few days being kept sealed on the counter. Have you ever come across this problem? I assume if it was a problem of the bread going bad it would get mouldy…but this isn’t mould, it looks like cobwebs inside the bread. I read up on it and people say that the cobwebs are from moth eggs. Once I read that, I got rid of my original flours and purchased new items at a different store from a different brand. I made the bread right away and stored the flours in the fridge. Once again though, each bread I make..after 3-4 days, it got cobweby. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWy3u38J3aw
Since your loaf pan isn’t all that much larger, I would first just alter the cook time. This bread will probably cook a bit quicker in a slightly larger pan, so I would recommend checking it about 5 minutes sooner. However, the loaf may not rise as high as it would in a smaller pan; if you’re looking for a higher rise to your bread I would try it with 1.5 times the ingredients and an increased cook time. Please let me know how it goes if you give it a try!
I am 77 autoimmune celiac. for two years I have been strictly grain free and diary free, salt free,eat no added sugar, all organic, no processed foods. I walk and walk and walk some more, garden and have no other health issues. I weigh now what I weighed at 27 after having had 4 babies. 133 pounds. I kept off a 65 pound weight loss easily and happily. I all back to the land for years and years and raised my own grain milled or ground it up and baked my own bread and made my own cheese from milk from my own goats and cows. So I know good and healthy. I would rather have the energy and brains I have now than go back to eating grain and dairy. I still make my own ‘cheese’ from nonfat yogurt.
Dessert is the hardest bad habit to break when you commit to a new and improved healthy eating resolution. The good news is that there are SO many natural alternatives, you can easily hack a way to #TreatYoSelf to your favorite sweets. We’ve seen healthy bean desserts become all the rage, and most of them are refined sugar-free and Paleo-friendly. Since chocolate is everyone’s go-to treat of choice, healthy chocolate recipes are also quite coveted in the diet world. Lucky for you, we dug up 18 Paleo chocolate desserts that are so indulgent, you won’t believe they’re secretly good for you.
Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5n68qEhqIM
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this!
I made this as written using the pan that Elana linked to and was a little disappointed with the height. A friend of mine said she makes the gluten free bread with a 4″x4″ pyrex pan because it gets taller and better for sandwiches, so i tried the Paleo bread again using her idea. It got taller, but the top looks like a volcano erupted. I’m not quite sure how to get a smoother top or what i did wrong for this to happen.
Richard Nikoley has the blog Free The Animal. He loves meat eating. His diet is near paleo, with the addition of some gray-area foods that he likes. These days most of his posts are on food. One recent trend in the paleo community is trying to optimize the proportions of the foods eaten. If you've read my definition you'll know that I simply define the diet as foods in and out. One of Richard's posts: Optimality: A Fool's Errand? has produced a long discussion of this trend.

Well my Bread wasn’t tall enough for say sandwich stuff, and I am not sure if I did anything wrong, I know I used the wrong sized bread pan so that is one thing. However, I couldn’t believe how great it tasted, it was more like a moist custard shortbread. The texture and color were perfect. I cut some thick slices and buttered both sides cooked them in a pan. I spread some sugar-free preserves on top, wow is that good. I may not have made it as intended but I can’t complain. The flavor is amazing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eyshsebziA
Making this homemade bread is easy and kid-friendly! Paleo bread is different from gluten free bread because often on the paleo diet most grains are avoided. So gluten-free breads made with gluten-free flours like rice flour, teff flour, and corn meal would not be considered paleo bread! I like using this  combination of almond flour and tapioca flour as it creates the most legit paleo bread, and gluten-free I’ve ever tried! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PsxZ6jsALk
The only bad thing about this bread is that I CAN’T STOP EATING IT! Lol. I’ve been without bread for two months. The first recipe I tried from Pinterest was a flax loaf that was a huge failure. This recipe was easy to make and turned out awesome. I used three eggs instead of four because I only had large/extra large eggs to choose from. It has the texture of banana bread so I originally thought it will be more of a treat vs a sandwich bread. I’ve been putting jams on it but then I saw the suggestion of pesto with tomatoes so I will be trying that next and will also try toasting it. Much thanks to the creator of this recipe and for sharing it!
I haven’t tested this recipe without tapioca starch, but in the Notes section above I list a few of the substitutions I’ve tested and had success with. Tapioca starch helps to add rise and bounce to this loaf, making it somewhat “fluffy” and closer to the texture of regular bread. If you decide to experiment with this recipe using something other than tapioca starch, please let me know what works!
Hi Ria! First off- coconut four will not work as a sub for arrowroot- they have completely different properties and react differently, so that’s why your bread didn’t work out. If you follow the recipe it should turn out great! I love your adventurous spirit in cooking 🙂 I would suggest making the recipe as directed for better results. About the hard bread- I have a fabulous hard crusty bread in my paleo bread ebook that fits the bill (seeds can easily be adds to it). Hope that helps! 🙂 🙂 Hard bread recipe: https://paleoglutenfree.com/shop/quick-easy-paleo-breads/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9oVDL7ACno
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