Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham. This book argues that the ease of digestion and the added nutritional value available in cooked food was the key behind the explosion of human intelligence. (Cooking gelatinizes starch, denatures protein, and softens all foods, permitting more complete digestion and energy extraction. As a result, the food processing apparatus shrinks, freeing energy to support a larger brain.) He then suggests that cooking led to what eventually became marriage and the sexual division of labor. The two most helpful reviews at Amazon get into great detail. The reviews average to 4+ stars.
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY
Argh! I’ve literally made 4 different recipes today for yeast free/gluten free breads, and every last one has been a fail. This one is in the oven as I write (please let it be good!). I had to sub a flour because hubby can’t have almond products so I will keep that in mind if it’s not perfect, but seems to at least have potential. I also only had duck eggs, which are large, so used 3 instead of 4 (can’t have chicken eggs either). I will let you know how it turned out! Thanks for the recipe!
I have just found your website and it is fantastic! Sitting at my computer my mouth is watering. I’m very new to the Gluten-free scene and am seriously considering Paleo as well so your website is a godsend. One question though, you mentioned how to measure the flour for your recipes and gave a weight in grams (thank you) but I have tried American recipes before and I think our tablespoon measure might be different also. How many millilitres is there in one of your tablespoon’s?
Hi Elana…I did this with your bread and it was ridiculously tasty!!! Herb roasted tomatoes on top of your Paleo bread spread with a little leftover chevre that I’d rolled in some Creole seasoning. I LOVE this bread (well, and all of your recipes really)!!! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/holly.oleary.14/posts/10204240445388312?comment_id=10204240832958001&offset=0&total_comments=8
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0A-WD-kz-o4
Following the paleo diet can be pricey. Inexpensive and healthy non-meat protein sources like soy and beans are off-limits, and a recent BMJ Open study shows that healthy meats like lean ground beef and boneless, skinless chicken breasts cost an average of 29 cents more per serving compared to less-healthy ones, such as high-fat ground beef and chicken drumsticks. Even switching from peanut butter to paleo-approved almond butter will cost you—it goes for up to $13 a jar.
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
Wow! Thank you, thank you thank you! I’ve been paleo for 2 months- already dropped a dress size (back to my usual size) and feel more energetic, despite numerous health problems- have tried other paleo ‘bread’ recepie’s but they have all been variations of ‘omelette’ . I read these ingredients with eager anticipitation and…… Despite already trying 5 shops for Arrowroot powder, steeled myself for further search. Shop 7 I found it. It came In a pack of 6 x sachets of 1 tablespoon each serving. Have to say when I tipped them all in it was slightly under the amount required and I was worried the slightly less amount would have a detrimental effect..BUT…all other ingredients I followed to the exact recipe…. I lined my loaf tin with baking paper and prayed for success…….I got it out after 25 mins….put it back in……35 mins….. Back in….45 mins…..back in……by 55 mins the top was pretty brown so I covered it in foil ….and put it back in….. After 75 mins the tooth pick was still showing moist after sticking it in the middle so I took the whole loaf out, took it out of the the tin and paper and put it in- upside down- back in the tin for another 15 mins. The loaf stuck horribly to the paper. Couldn’t understand why but, whilst the loaf cooked upside down, I enjoyed peeling the stuck bits off the paper and eating them- delicious.

Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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