Another 2014 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the effects of the Paleo plan to those of a standard low-fat diet on 70 obese, postmenopausal women. After six months, the Paleo group lost 14 pounds on average, while the other group lost nearly 6 pounds. After a year, the Paleo group had lost 19 pounds on average, and the low-fat dieters had dropped 10 pounds. A year later, both groups had regained some weight: The Paleo group was still down 10 pounds, while the low-fat group had dropped an average of more than 6 pounds.
I have all the seeds but sesame seeds. I just have a small jar of those for using on top of things. Which of the other seeds could I use instead? Or, maybe chia seeds in a smaller amount? I also have a 3 seed mix with chia, flax and hemp. It really looks great! I haven’t had a lot of success with other keto, low carb breads. Want to give this a try. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o

Just made this exactly as listed with one sub of chia seed meal (made in dry Vitamix container) for the flaxseed meal, baked extra 5 minutes. Need to jiggle it out with a flat pancake flipper as though I did oil the pan, I did not use parchment as recommended. The loaf rose well in my 8.5 x 4.5 metal loaf pan. Hope everyone here likes it! I will report back. I plan to freeze some slices too.


Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.
re almond flour & coconut oil, any health food store staff would be super helpful in pointing you to the right ones, especially when you tell them you’ll baking. he showed me unbleached almond flour and coconut flour (Bob’s Red Mill is all over NYC, at least, and you can get it online http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Organic-16-Ounce/dp/B000KENKZ8/ref=sr_1_4?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1383057846&sr=1-4&keywords=bob%27s+red+mill+coconut their products are consistently great, IMHO)
My husband and I just started paleo at the beginning of the year and we both knew that giving up bread would be hard. Probably harder for my husband who is a steak bread and potatoe type of guy. We both absolutely loved it. I will have to double the recipe but as for this loaf he added a little butter and honey and said it was extremely filling. Thanks again

I am new to the Paleo diet and cooking with Almond Flour. I decided to try your Paleo Bread recipe first and it did not turn out the way yours looks in the picture…..instead it was more grainy and extremely dense, did not resemble bread in any way shape or form :-( I did not have coconut flour so that is the only ingredient I left out but I am hoping you can help me find the error in my ways. Please help!

Richard Nikoley has the blog Free The Animal. He loves meat eating. His diet is near paleo, with the addition of some gray-area foods that he likes. These days most of his posts are on food. One recent trend in the paleo community is trying to optimize the proportions of the foods eaten. If you've read my definition you'll know that I simply define the diet as foods in and out. One of Richard's posts: Optimality: A Fool's Errand? has produced a long discussion of this trend.
Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat—the paleo diet is all about eating foods straight from the Earth just as our ancestors did. Those ancestors didn't have livestock or crops to call their own, so Cordain advises to go with grass-fed and organic varieties whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn't exist back then. Research from Emory University suggests that Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein.

I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY

The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. The nutrient carnitine is abundant in red meat. According to Crayhon carnitine helps balance blood lipids and blood sugar levels, maximizes energy levels, increases endurance, eliminates discomfort in ketosis, promotes burning of fat and building of muscle and increases overall well-being. See reviews at Amazon.
While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog!
We have four of these separated, but I don’t know if they are oven safe. They have a little rubber, maybe silicone nobs on the end of the handles, but I’ve no idea if they can be used in the oven as they didn’t come in a package, they were bought separately and I am trying to find recipes for bread/buns that I can do that are quite easy and don’t require anything more than what I’ve already got.
I accidentally forgot mine when my “timer” didn’t remind me. I remembered it and pulled it out after it had been in the oven an extra 13 minutes. It was almost perfect. I also just whisked vigorously as my processor is missing since the last move. I will definitely make it again, but I will likely play with it a bit as I am hoping to find a few versions to make regularly to replace my family’s usual bread. Even our most finicky eater is loving these recipes so far. Thank you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DwSUL-i8i0
Like a lot of others, mine didn’t rise as much as I had hoped, so the crumb is a bit more dense. Next time, I’ll give it longer than an hour and see if that helps. My loaf pan is also a bit bigger, so I think I’ll do 1.5 times the recipe next time for a larger slice of bread as mine was very short and squat, lol. Overall though, I’m thrilled. This is by far the best grain-free bread I’ve ever tasted!
We’re loving the taste and texture of this–but like a few others, I came out with a dense. flat loaf (only about 1 1/2″ high). The liquid mixture seemed very thick, and the combined batter was almost a dough going into the pan, not exactly pourable. I know some almond flours behave differently; I used Bob’s Red Mill (only thing readily available here), if that makes a difference.
Elana – your site is my go-to place for all baking ideas and snack recipes. I’m a huge experimenter myself, so I love using your recipes for a base (or following exactly for a trial run) and then running wild. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into making your recipes not only edible, but delicious and filling and healthful. I’m always excited for your post.
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.

I have all the seeds but sesame seeds. I just have a small jar of those for using on top of things. Which of the other seeds could I use instead? Or, maybe chia seeds in a smaller amount? I also have a 3 seed mix with chia, flax and hemp. It really looks great! I haven’t had a lot of success with other keto, low carb breads. Want to give this a try.
My results: A nice golden loaf which did require an additional 10 min of bake time! I was very careful as to “fold” in the wet ingredients to the dry. It was “pourable” into the pan. I did not chill the coconut cream ( as I bought “cream” not milk). Next loaf I will chill it first. My loaf did not rise as much as in the picture, but only slightly “shorter”. So a smaller pain ( 7.25x 3.5) might fix this.
Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!
I followed this recipe meticulously…but this “bread” is nothing like sandwich bread. Extremely dense and super fatty (greasy) and my son can’t pick it up without it falling apart for a school lunch (Exactly what I wanted it for). I used the coconut cream instead of yogurt and homemade almond flour which was super fine from a quick final mix in the Vitamix. I’ll use it up with Jelly but I couldn’t imagine adding more fat to it like butter or almond butter…it already qualifies as a paper weight LOL.

Garlic bread goes great with any of the Paleo pastas we recommend. You’ll be blown away by how easy it is to make this, and how few ingredients it takes. You’ll also likely be pleased to see that it’s all natural ingredients with nothing artificial added, right down to using actual garlic for the garlic flavor. It’s amazing how many commercial foods have garlic flavor but don’t actually include any real garlic.

I know there is some conflict between whether sweet potatoes are Paleo or not but, since I am a personal training and exercise daily, I still eat them. In the Paleo Bread recipe I substituted 1/2 cup of the almond flour with 1/2 cup of sweet potato flour. I also baked them in 1.5 x 3 inch mini loaf pans for 20 mins instead of 30mins. They turned out really great. Adds a little bit extra nutritional value.
Paleo baking is gluten free and grain free. Generally, paleo bread recipes have quite a few more ingredient options than low carb baking. Ingredients like tapioca flour and arrowroot flour are common in paleo baked goods, and help improve the texture greatly. The only thing is, these ingredients are relatively high in carbs and are typically avoided (or at least reduced) in low carb baking. This is why paleo baking can sometimes be a bit easier than low carb and/or keto baking.
I make my own ACV from apple scraps. It’s so easy….after peeling and coring apples for another recipe, you take the scraps, let them air dry for a bit, then put them in a jar with water, cover with coffee filter and rubberband, put in cabinet and let it sit. 3 days is minimum, and better is 5-6 weeks or longer. I have let it sit for months and have come out with a great product. My first batch, I did add a couple tablespoons of Braggs as a starter. This will create a “mother” you can use over and over again. It’s a continuous process…and you never run out of ACV! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBhI-tjhei4
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