[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfDrmTzbLSM
umm, hard to say what may have caused this to happen. A few things I can think of are the temperature in your oven, the other ingredients you used, and the way you measured them. It’s so hard to say. I’ve made this bread with Welbee’s so it’s not that. Are you using measuring spoons and cups? I think you should try again. If you can purchase an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it during baking I would do that. Every oven is so different… Here’s one for $6.51 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1WcJ1tv. Also, when you use test your bread with the stick, be sure to insert it all the way in, and in a couple different places. Please let me know how it goes when you make it again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6x5GgSa5j8

This is great! I have tried GF bread recipes numerous times, to no avail… which was very disheartening, since I can make wonderful wheat bread without even thinking about it! But THIS recipe turned out great! It made a fluffy, moist bread that held up to slicing, holding burgers, everything you could want in a bread! And it couldn’t get any simpler to make. I doubled the recipe and baked in a loaf pan for 30min as suggested above, since I don’t have the rings, and it was great. Thank you for an awesome recipe! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q-9OvUXEnk
But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2wGrYngpJ0
In our keto bread recipe, we use a combination of coconut and almond flours so neither is overpowering. We also use a touch of psyllium husk powder to help achieve the right texture. A little bit of beef gelatin acts as a binder and adds bread-like “chew” to the final result. Our recipe only contains egg whites, which add structure and act as a natural leavening agent, but without the eggy flavor that the yolks would add.
Thank you so much for this recipe!! I am Norwegian and eating bread for multiple meals is part of our culture. I have not had too many problems with switching to a paleo diet but I have sorely missed eating bread. I have tried many gluten free and paleo bread recipes out there but this is by far the best one. I used 4 wide mouth canning jar lids and otherwise followed your recipe exactly and they came out nice and fluffy and even held up with “wet” sandwich ingredients . I am going to try some of the variations in the comments. Thank you for bringing back a vital part of my culture! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye9x6AAcrUk
Optimal Diet is a dietary model of human nutrition devised and implemented by Dr. Jan Kwasniewski. Lots of fat and low in carbs. Lots and lots of articles collected from various places. He has an out-of-print book: Optimal Nutrition. The book is explained at the Australian Homo Optimus Association website. A thorough analysis is the first post here: Dr. Kwasniewski's Optimal Diet: Sanity, Clarity, Facts.
Gluten is a protein found in things like rye, wheat, and barley. It’s now being said that much of our population may be gluten-intolerant (hence all the new “gluten-free!” items popping up everywhere).  Over time, those who are gluten intolerant can develop a dismal array of medical conditions from consuming gluten: dermatitis, joint pain, reproductive problems, acid reflux, and more.[2]
Today I accidentally used besan (chickpea or garbanzo flour) and again, it came out great. I had forgotten that the almond flour was in the fridge and not the cabinet. I was wondering what was going on when the dough was much more sticky, was slightly darker, and smelled differently. I realized my mistake, cooked it anyway, and now have an acceptable substitute for almond flour. I think I like the almond better, but will enjoy this loaf anyway.

Made with peanut butter instead of almond butter because that’s what I had. I could taste the coconut (which I like), but I will try substituting butter for the coconut oil next time (or half butter half coconut oil), as I am trying to find a good sandwich bread recipe for my picky 5 year old. It’s like a banana bread consistency, but when lightly toasted with butter, reminds me of regular wheat bread. Delicious, and will definitely make again! Thank you for the recipe!
With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.

Hi Nancy, this recipe does not make enough batter to properly fill a full sized loaf pan. So, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
Paleo Bread™ was inspired by the Paleolithic diet due to it’s health and dietary benefits.  Those who follow the Paleo lifestyle cut out all grains and eat what our native hunters and gatherers ate many years ago.  It’s a food plan based on lean meats, seafood, nuts, fruits, and fresh vegetables.  We created two versions of Paleo Bread which meet any and all requirements in order to be kind to practically any diet.  Both breads are healthy, low calorie, gluten free and grain free.  The Almond variety and the Coconut variety are equally tasty and both offer their own unique benefits.
• Determine adequacy. Examine the diet recommendations, paying attention to foods and food groups eliminated. Ensure clients have the necessary tools to maintain proper macronutrient and micronutrient intakes. This means focusing on appropriate portion sizes and preparation techniques for fish, poultry, beef, venison, eggs, and other animal proteins, along with fruit and vegetable consumption with each meal. If clients insist on avoiding dairy and grains, find alternative ways they can meet daily requirements for nutrients such as fiber, calcium, and vitamin D. Supplementation for some nutrients may be necessary.
The Dietitian's Guide to Eating Bugs by Daniel Calder is a comprehensive guide to the nutritional content of insects. He believes insect breeding and consumption are important elements sustainable living, particularly when it comes to complementing foraged plant material with meat products. Numerous insects contain nutrients similar to those found in more conventional livestock, except the feed to conversion ratio is much higher and they're much cheaper to breed. You can find the book at scribd. Also available in e-book format for $35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrpA7FjV8w4

I use parchment paper to avoid the aluminum in the pan and that makes a nice liner to lift out the loaf (no cleaning!). I’ve made it with coconut oil, ghee, and regular butter… it’s always yummy! I’ve substituted coconut sugar for the honey and once even made it without a sweetener… it’s always fantastic! Occasionally I’ll substitute chia for the flax seed, too, but the basic recipe is the backbone for all my experimenting.
Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwVwQiqe4eM

On his website, Sisson writes that "while the world has changed in innumerable ways in the last 10,000 years (for better and worse), the human genome has changed very little and thus only thrives under similar conditions." This is simply not true. In fact, this reasoning misconstrues how evolution works. If humans and other organisms could only thrive in circumstances similar to the ones their predecessors lived in, life would not have lasted very long. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkdRgTzaJtY
This has been happening to me too! I make it exactly how the recipe is written. I tried baking it longer and its still hollow in the middle and mushy. It used to come out perfect for me but the last 4 times it has been this way. I just recently moved and made the first loaf in the new oven and same thing!! So frustrating. Maybe cover it with foil and cook it even longer than 35 min? What rack should it be on? Please help!! I can’t live without my paleo bread!!
Trying to devise an ideal diet by studying contemporary hunter-gatherers is difficult because of the great disparities that exist; for example, the animal-derived calorie percentage ranges from 25% for the Gwi people of southern Africa to 99% for the Alaskan Nunamiut.[40] Descendants of populations with different diets have different genetic adaptations to those diets, such as the ability to digest sugars from starchy foods.[40] Modern hunter-gatherers tend to exercise considerably more than modern office workers, protecting them from heart disease and diabetes, though highly processed modern foods also contribute to diabetes when those populations move into cities.[40]
Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up.

Katrina, I have tried a lot of low carb keto breads and this one really looks interesting. I was suprised to see that you have no baking powder at all in the mixture. Had you tried it and found it produced an undesirable effect, or did this version work so well you never tried it with baking powder? Just wonder if it might lighten it up a bit but hesitate to try it with it if you found it ruined your loaf.

I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
Sounds like your baking soda is old and/or spoiled. It explains the lack of rise, tingling tongue, chemical taste (washing soda [sodium carbonate, I think] is made by heating baking soda [sodium bicarbonate] in big ovens), and maybe the extra salty flavor, too. I’ve had bad baking soda spoil baked goods, and it’s a real bummer. Hope you try again, though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_JUritU2IE
Oh hey there Monday. I’m ready for my peanut butter apple pie cake breakfast fuel to start off the week!  Ya’ll, I have a feeling I’m going to need a lot of energy this week. Not to mention good “golden” food to boost my immunity (post surgery).  Good thing I have a bread recipe to share (and devour). Um, yes, this paleo bread recipe is totally my bread and butter today! Haha. Plus I  think you’re totally gonna love it! Who doesn’t love a good bread recipe? Bread is needed in life. Always.
Elana – I would love it if you would share more of your cooking notes with your readers. I think it would really help those of us who need or want to experiment with ingredients and/or quantities. For instance, I made this bread and find it too “eggy” so I might try it again with one fewer egg. If I knew more about your process it could help mine. Thanks for all of your hard work! I get frustrated with one bad cooking experiment — you do it for a living!

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
Hi everyone, I made this for the first time having started the paleo walk. I come from New Zealand and some of our food terms are very different. For instance in the USA your biscuit …is a cookie here, and what we call a scone is your biscuit . You are probably wondering where is this woman going with this… Well!.. I made this bread recipe yesterday it was absolutely delicious .. However it’s texture is more like a loaf not a sandwich bread. When I say a loaf, I mean something similar to a date loaf or a type of banana cake but made in a loaf tin. I just thought to share my cultural experience with the rest of the world. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYUx8rBOK-0
Make it Paleo: Over 200 Grain Free Recipes For Any Occasion by Bill Staley and Hayley Mason. The book shows you how easy it is to take any dish and Make it Paleo! Adapted from Chinese, French, Mexican and classic American meals, the over 200 recipes are each accompanied by good photos and notes to ensure you recreate each dish with ease. Most recipes are ones that can be found in an ordinary cookbook. Butter and vinegar are also used, which I do not consider paleo. Published October 20, 2011.

I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful.
I am so happy that I found your site! I have been trying for a couple years to find a good bread/roll recipe (I’m kind of picky) and this is the first one that I have absolutely loved. My kids love them too. I am going to order the molds you use but for now am making them in a muffin pan and they turn out great. So far I’ve used them with tuna salad and your sloppy joe recipe (which is also delicious! ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT3-ea4BwiE
This is the best!!!! It got rave reviews from everyone, even my most pickiest eater!! I cannot thank you enough for posting this. We just switched to a gluten-free, dairy-free, and grain-free lifestyle and this is exactly what I have been missing. I used these with my homemade BBQ turkey burgers last night.. Thank you again, this is now in my recipe book to stay!!
Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FpxXPQ4dhc
“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating.
Hi, LOVE this bread!! So do my kids :) I have a problem though with the bread sticking in places to the bottom, so I tend to lose some of it..(handy quick desert though) Any suggestions as to how to keep the loaf intact? I have been using lard to liberally grease the bottom, Its still sticking. I have been waiting about 15 minutes before trying to remove it….should it be cold? Thanks A bunch!!
Hello, I had similar problem (not as drastic) with my son. If the bread you are giving him is gluten free he is getting no gluten. Try putting a piece of cheese with a dab of honey on his plate and see if the picks it up eventually. Don’t mention anything different. Also a very thin slice of apple or banana with almond butter on it. Just Introduce different things but about the same size and coloring. Next He needs to be on a protein shake with hidden kale in it. You must start slow with almond milk and ice and honey. See if he will drink it with a straw? If you can continue adding other things– he will pick it up eventually. Also use behavior modification by telling him if he tries the shake ( one sip at first) you will let him watch a favorite show or movie. He likes these flavors already. Good Luck.
The most common reason that any bread falls is that it needed to bake for longer. That being said, I’ll be perfectly honest – sometimes this keto bread recipe falls anyway, even despite doing everything else right. Fortunately this isn’t a huge deal because it still tastes delicious – IF you baked it for long enough and the center is cooked through. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUvRMTnEC5M
The Great Cholesterol Con by Anthony Colpo. The definitive book on the non-dangers of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat was The Cholesterol Myths by Uffe Ravnskov, 2000. This book is six years newer. Its forward is by Uffe Ravnskov. To get a wonderful description of the book read the leading review at Amazon. The many reviews there average to 5 stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U1qQM2vV_E
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!
Slight changes I had to make: pumpkin puree in place of the applesauce (1:1), a whoopie pie pan in place of the ring molds, and I baked for 12 minutes instead of 15. The pan yielded 8 “rolls” which I sliced *very* thinly to make some jam and nut butter sandwiches. Delicious! Thanks so much for the recipe! (I found this recipe via Pinterest, by the way.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlAiM0E68Oc
Garlic bread goes great with any of the Paleo pastas we recommend. You’ll be blown away by how easy it is to make this, and how few ingredients it takes. You’ll also likely be pleased to see that it’s all natural ingredients with nothing artificial added, right down to using actual garlic for the garlic flavor. It’s amazing how many commercial foods have garlic flavor but don’t actually include any real garlic.
The almond bread toasts well! I enjoy it with avocado in the mornings or all sorts of toppings. I feel great after eating it and restaurants let me hand them the bag and they toast it for me or use it to make sandwiches! I am very happy I can eat a bread with no nightshades-potato starch, e.g., nor yeast. My arthritis is absent when I refrain from nightshades and fermented items. I eat gluten and dairy free due to autoimmune issues and have normal labs with these dietary changes. I eat from the garden and meat, but really like breads! I like ALL of Julian’s breads and there is zero competition out there! Thank you, Julian, for loving us enough to feed us!

These are the best rolls I have ever had I have been gluten-free and Paleo for at least eight years and this is by far the best thank you so much for the recipe will make all the time have tried many many recipes just didn’t like him this is absolutely perfect. Also made them in a muffin tin pan just perfect for sandwiches or hamburgers or sloppy Joe’s.
I have a question for you about eggs. Do you have any particular size or volume of “egg” that you tend to use in your recipes? In most of my cookbooks, an “egg” means a medium sized egg that yields about 50mls by volume, so there are slightly more than 5 eggs in a cup. I tend to buy extra large eggs locally, and I find that when a recipe calls for more than 3 eggs, the end result is quite “egg-y.” I’m going to experiment, but perhaps you would be able to tell me if there is a size or volume of egg that you tend to use in your recipes. (I didn’t see anything specific under the “ingredient” menu on your blog.)
I buy whole golden flax seeds. I grind them very fine to use them so my flax seed meal is always fresh and not rancid. I have never tried it in bread so am going to give it a shot with this recipe. Hope it turns out. There are so many glowing comments for this bread. I don’t eat grains and usually just use cloud bread which I love but my grandchildren would prefer a “slice” of bread. Do you think this would turn out in a pullman pan?
I made my first loaf today and it turned out perfectly. It’s delicious! One thing – I could not get the yeast to proof using honey so I just used a generous pinch of sugar. Worked great. My house is not overly warm this time of year so I put my pizza stone in the oven and set it to warm then turned it off a little while before the dough was ready to rise. Seemed to do the trick. I imagine the stone helped to keep the oven warm enough. The dough rose like a champ. Oh, I also left the ginger out. I’m not sure if it would have been obvious but I’m not a lover of the stuff so just didn’t take the chance. Thanks for a great recipe!
I just want to add my two cents. I do 1.5 times the recipe in the same size pan, which I finally found at my local Dollar Tree. I calculated the macros and since I can usually get 20 slices per loaf, each slice is still only 2 net carbs. I use a bamboo bread slicer that helps me get such thin pieces. I also place the bread on top of my stove at the back while the oven preheats for about1 hour at least. Anyway, this bread is the BEST Keto bread, and I wish everyone luck in making it.
Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baEZwX4imOc

For all the recipes claiming to be the best paleo or Keto bread, I think yours is! I have found your recipe very helpful in satisfying keto cravings for bread. I am a personal chef and now a hero to my low-carb clients. I’d like to share this recipe in a cooking Keto article for our United States Personal Chef Association member magazine. Would you mind? It would of course be attributed to you/your site!

The Paleo diet, also referred to as the caveman or Stone-Age diet, includes lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Proponents of the diet emphasize choosing low-glycemic fruits and vegetables. There is debate about several aspects of the Paleo diet: what foods actually existed at the time, the variation in diets depending on region (e.g., tropical vs. Arctic), how modern-day fruits and vegetables bear little resemblance to prehistoric wild versions, and disagreement among Paleo diet enthusiasts on what is included/excluded from the diet. Because of these differences, there is not one “true” Paleo diet.


I made the original version a while back and had the unfortunate “tunneling” effect that other people mentioned. The bread that did bake all the way through was delicious though so I tried again with the modified version. That took about 45 minutes total to bake but was cooked all the way through! And it’s just as delicious as the original! Had a couple slices tonight with some beef stew. Can’t wait to have some for breakfast tomorrow!

This is really good. I only use 3 eggs,. I didn’t have any arrowroot powder, so I used cornstarch instead. I used lemon juice instead of ACV because ACV gives me migraines and I used coconut cream (don’t like yogurt). It tasted a bit like sweet bread, but it made an excellent sandwich. It didn’t rise like the picture. I’m sure it because of the substitutions I made. I always make sandwiches cutting the bread in half anyway so it didn’t matter that it didn’t rise as high as the picture shows. This will be my go to bread for now on. Oh yeah. I baked it for 45 minutes instead of 25. Ovens temperatures and climates varies for baking. I always baked paleo breads on 350 degrees for 45 minutes. It comes out perfect every time. Thank you so much for posted this recipe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zq0Ix-Vfoww
Wowwwww!!! This is amazing. I had to change the recipe a bit (I followed the top recipe) because of lack of ingredients. I used Raw Almond Flour (not blanched); I used only three eggs + one chia egg + one flax egg; and my pan was about 8.5*4, so a bit bigger than recommended; I did not use the food processor, just mixed everything with a whisk and a spoon. Even though the pan was larger the height was great, and I’ve never had such a moist bread. Incredible! It is so delicious and wonderful. And so easy to make!! Thank you so much- I haven’t eaten anything like this since quitting gluten. This will be my go-to bread from now on.
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
Diet has been an important part of our evolution—as it is for every species—and we have inherited many adaptations from our Paleo predecessors. Understanding how we evolved could, in principle, help us make smarter dietary choices today. But the logic behind the Paleo diet fails in several ways: by making apotheosis of one particular slice of our evolutionary history; by insisting that we are biologically identical to stone age humans; and by denying the benefits of some of our more modern methods of eating.
Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.

Hi I made the Easy paleo keto bread 5 ingredients. It was moist, texture was good but it didn’t turn out completely white, more like a pale yellow and the crust was overdone. I opted for honey as my sweetner because this bread is for my nephew who has autism and we want to keep it as natural as possible. I baked the bread exactly at 325 for 40mins uncovered and then another 40mins covered (tent). What could I do next time to achieve a white bread with golden crust?
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0A-WD-kz-o4
YUM! I am going into week 3 of Paleo and missed bread. This is yummy although I need I smaller pan because it’s short. Not that that matters, I eat it alone or with grass-fed butter anyway! 🙂 I did have flax seeds, just the ground flax. And I used coconut oil (not butter) and coconut cream. It came out great! I cooked it for 35 minutes because even though the toothpick came out clean, it still didn’t “look” done. 35 minutes was perfect! Thanks for the recipe!
I’ve been experimenting with your low carb corn bread recipe this week, not necessarily trying to emulate cornbread specifically but just to make a keto-friendly bread-like food, and that recipe was the first candidate I found browsing your site. I started off with a half recipe (fudging the fractional egg) because I only had around 2 tbsp of flaxmeal (brown, not golden) on hand. I quite enjoyed it, so I bought more flaxmeal and tried the recipe substituting hazelnut flour for almond, and again brown flaxmeal for golden and it was delicious (I gotta lay off! I can’t stop eating it, as I basically haven’t had bread in 3 years!) (brief note: I needed to bake quite a bit longer than you instructed both times.)
I tried this recipe (delicious, btw) substituting sunflower meal for flax meal (in the middle of hurricane Sandy and had no flax), and the bread turned green… SO glad that someone else experienced this and it was answered. Thank you! That helps. It didn’t rise as much as I hoped – maybe it was because of the substitution…? In either case, thank you for this fantastic recipe! My husband and I loved it.

I’ve only made this once, but it sounds like my experience is common…once it cools, this loaf is about 4 inches tall…too small to really be sandwich bread, unless you erase conventional bread slicing. Start by making a “normal” vertical cut half way down the loaf so you have 2 mini loaves. Now slice horizontally to make your slices. Still won’t be particularly big, but big enough to get the job done. And I’ve found the bread to be resilient enough to get 5 horizontal slices (per mini loaf) like this, for a total of five 2-slice sandwiches. Your slices will be very thin, but toughen them up in the toaster and call it a day.
I want to marry you because of this recipe (okay, maybe a tad dramatic). I only had tapioca starch so made it according to your instructions and subbed the flaxseed meal for chia because that was all I had but this bread turned out perfectly. I’m not exactly paleo and I’m generally a good cook, bad baker but this worked even for the inept baker like me. Thank you so much! Next time, I think I’ll try topping it with sunflower seeds just for an extra bite!
I have made these so many times in the last few weeks and have shared the recipe with many friends. They are delicious and so easy! I don’t really like the taste of Palm shortening, so I used coconut oil, softening it in the microwave, not melting. But don’t put it in wet ingredients because the coldness from the eggs will harden it again. Mix with dry ingredients, working out all the lumps with hands and distributing it evenly. I double the recipe and then separate it. I have added rosemary or dill or jalapenos/bacon/cheese to batter. So delicious. I am going to try more variations and add other herbs as I go. Thank you so much for such a great recipe. I was missing bread and these are perfect for chicken salad, tuna salad, turkey burgers, etc. And…. I save so much money because the gluten free breads in the grocery store are so expensive.
As a follow up to my post a few days ago about the ammonia smell after I slice the bread…..someone mentioned it could be the flax. So I baked a loaf and substituted chia for the flax, and still got the ammonia smell. I am wondering if there is some kind of chemical reaction taking place? And if so, I would assume this is not safe to eat? Is it the baking soda? Or apple cider vinegar? I don’t want to keep using up all my almond flour (I use Trader Joe’s), so if someone has any insight I would love to hear. Thanks
The Paleo diet, also referred to as the "caveman" or "Stone Age" diet, stems from the eating patterns of our ancestors who lived during the Paleolithic era, a time period associated with the development of mankind's tool-making skills, ending around 12,000 years ago. During that time, the women gathered fruit, berries, and vegetables, while the men hunted for meat. In today's modern era, the diet involves mimicking the same eating habits and consuming fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, healthful oils (eg, walnut, olive, coconut, and avocado), meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, and eggs in hopes of leading to a more healthful and disease-free life. The diet also encourages consumption of cage-free eggs and grass-fed meats (lean meat is recommended). It prohibits eating grains, dairy, legumes, potatoes, refined sugar, and refined vegetable oils, because proponents claim these foods appeared only after the agricultural revolution and are associated with inflammation and therefore many chronic conditions including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Not only is the diet touted as a more healthful eating pattern but it's also promoted as beneficial for weight loss.
Elana – your site is my go-to place for all baking ideas and snack recipes. I’m a huge experimenter myself, so I love using your recipes for a base (or following exactly for a trial run) and then running wild. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into making your recipes not only edible, but delicious and filling and healthful. I’m always excited for your post.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwQgjq0mCdE
Paleo baked goods are free of gluten, refined sugars, and dairy. If you’ve perfected regular baking and now you’ve gone paleo, you might be surprised at just how different this way of baking is. I find that in order to get the closest simulation of regular bread (i.e., bread that has gluten), it’s often useful to use a combination of a few different paleo-friendly flours.
Well my Bread wasn’t tall enough for say sandwich stuff, and I am not sure if I did anything wrong, I know I used the wrong sized bread pan so that is one thing. However, I couldn’t believe how great it tasted, it was more like a moist custard shortbread. The texture and color were perfect. I cut some thick slices and buttered both sides cooked them in a pan. I spread some sugar-free preserves on top, wow is that good. I may not have made it as intended but I can’t complain. The flavor is amazing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eyshsebziA
I tried this recipe and it is not at all easy to incorporate 1/2 the egg whites in the food processor. When attempting to pulse just 2-3 times, only part of the egg whites incorporated, leaving 1/2 the whipped egg whites still sitting at the top of the mixture. I then had to use a spatula to force it down and pulsed 3 more times and ended up with a heavy batter because the egg whites completely fell. Then trying to fold the mixture into the rest of the egg whites was like trying to fold in cookie dough. The result was a loaf of baked eggs whites that had clumps of batter in the middle.
Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.
I’ve tried a few other paleo/grain free breads and this is by far the best. It tastes great but what’s amazing about this recipe is ITS SO EASY. Being able to throw all the ingredients in a mixer and not having to fuss with whipping and folding in egg whites, etc is a perk. I made two modifications and it turned out well. Slightly melted raw honey in place of maple syrup and I doubled the recipe because I like the loaf to be close to a standard size (obviously adds a quite longer bake time but worth it).
A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGEAVWKGb1U
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.
Hi there. The bottom right features a bread that almost looks like it is made of poppy seeds. It’s a different color than expected. Maybe chia…So I was curious which recipe it could be. I may have missed it, but I don’t see the pictures captioned with their corresponding recipes and I looked at all the recipes and I don’t see that particular picture on the linked pages. Now I have to know which one that could be! Please let me know ; )
Just finished baking this tonight. It’s a little bit on the eggy side for me, so I will follow other comments and use half egg whites beaten until fluffy next time. I didn’t have flax meal so used 1/4 C more coconut flour. It’s really light and has great coconut flavor, which is my preference. My 4-yr old son liked it! I am so happy about that. I topped it with some strawberry preserves and he is enjoying it with a cup of warm milk. I did have a little tunnel of under-doneness on top, but I moved the oven rack to the top and popped it under the broiler for 3 minutes which seemed to solve the problem. Overall – I am surprised that the texture is closer to white bread than I had expected. I am just REALLY happy to have some bread after my first month on Paleo and feel absolutely NOT GUILTY! YAYYY!
I’m Amy, foodie, nutritionist, recipe developer, wife, and busy mom of 2. I am on a mission to create everyday nutritious recipes that taste absolutely DELICIOUS!!! I love comfort food with a healthy twist. Follow me as I share the simple meals I make for my family. I’ll make meal planning easy by telling you exactly what we eat every week! Read More
I made this last night and it turned out great! I used Bob’s Red Mill almond flour which I know you don’t usually recommend and subbed 1/8 cup chia seed for the flax because that’s what I had on hand and it worked well. We’ve had grilled cheese and peanut butter sandwiches so far. My son is autistic and a very picky eater, and sometimes we have a hard time getting him the protein he needs so this recipe helps a lot. Thanks, Elana!
Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yjGDjjk7OA
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