Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FpxXPQ4dhc

Made this divine loaf for the very first time this morning, following the recipe exactly. It’s already half gone! I’ve tried multiple paleo sandwich bread recipes and none of them have turned out great…except this one. It’s simply delicious. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. It’s obvious that a lot of trial and error went into perfecting it. It’s so so good!
My bread didn’t turn out well at all. I don’t use dairy, so I couldn’t use the yogurt and that might be it. I also has some issues with my coconut cream taking it’s good ole’ time melting and blending, so my “wet” mixture sat longer than it should have and that might have caused some issues. I will try again, but the flavor and consistency reminded me more of a banana bread than a sandwich bread. So far, not a fan. Hope I can make a go of it next time.
Hi Gabriel, thank you! I think using bananas in this recipe will not work in place of the arrowroot. Although the bananas are also a starch, it will add moisture and affect the overall texture and taste. You could maybe substitute the yogurt for the bananas, but again the taste of your bread will be different. I have a few banana bread recipes on this blog. Do a search for banana bread to find them.

This is amazingly similar to real bread. I made a few changes, but I’m so happy with how it turned out! I can’t wait to make this for my Mom. Next time I will double the recipe to get normal sized bread. The changes I made were that I used 3 eggs and 1 chia egg. I also baked 10 extra minutes because of all the complaints about a doughy center, but ended up overbaking. Next time I will stick to the original baking time. Thank you so much Elana! I love your vegan herb crackers as well; I eat vegan 4 times a week and they are life savers! Definitely a staple. I can tell that they are one of the things I will be taking to college with me once I graduate in 2 years :)
“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)
Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvA68vYZtDE
I doubled the recipe and baked in a glass loaf pan (standard U.S. size) at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. The texture was great, but the taste was not so great…like baking soda (soapy/salty/bitter). I finally figured out that the baking soda didn’t have enough acid to react with, because I make my own raw applesauce in the Vitamix. Many prepared applesauce brands have citric acid added. I will try making this again tomorrow with the addition of a teaspoon or two of lemon juice. Hopefully that will be enough to react with the baking soda and remove the awful aftertaste. My husband didn’t care at all. He made two ham sandwiches with four slices of the bread, and then ate two more slices with jam. Half the loaf is gone already!

Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5n68qEhqIM
I’m new to the whole GF thing – I don’t have a physical need/condition for eating grain free, but the whole concept of this healthy way of eating intrigues me, so I’m just “testing the waters.” It is very generous that Elana shares her recipes for free so that I can give it a try before jumping in with both feet – and when/if I do, I’ll be buying her recipe books. Great blog. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqPcH8zEStw

Tapioca Flour: Also called tapioca starch, tapioca flour is made from the root of the cassava plant. Tapioca flour is nearly flavorless, so it’s good for using in both sweet and savory recipes. In paleo baking, this flour helps lighten up and improve the texture of paleo baked goods and make them a bit springier, and also helps with browning. This is why I like using it along with other denser paleo flours, such as almond flour.


Sounds great. I just wondered if I chose to use just coconut flour and not almond, how much more coconut flour would I use than the original recipe calls for? I know that coconut flour soaks up much more liquid than almond floud so not sure if I would also need to add more liquid and if so what and how much? I’m new to paleo and not much of a cook but I’m trying to change that, esp with this new lifestyle change I’m trying to make. The Paleo bread I can get in stores is just too expensive, so I’m trying to do this on my own to save money. Also I need something like this to use with almond butter as a post-workout snack after hitting the gym. Options for portable protein are really limited, so that would work the best.
Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.
I had to make some changes. I’m allergic to chicken eggs so I used duck eggs. I don’t use flaxseed; it’s an endocrine disruptor but I had hemp seed powder so I used that. I also have chia seed to grind so I will try that next time. Baking time was 10 minutes longer, maybe because of the duck eggs. Slices beautifully and is delicious! Thank you, Elana, for looking out for us Paleos!
My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.

Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIWMOrBumSk

The vinegar, when added last, gives the bread the rise. Often, Russian recipes call for baking soda and vinegar to give the rise (air pockets) you would normally get from yeast. I’m assuming, based on what I’ve read, that ACV has more health benefits, and a slightly different taste. I just took my bread out of the oven and it rose beautifully. Similar breads I’ve made called for less wet ingredients and were much denser. I can’t wait to cut this baby open and take a peek.
These researchers point out that there are plenty of reasons to suggest that the low-fat-is-good-health hypothesis has now effectively failed the test of time. In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980’s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.)
Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube.

1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do.
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUNe5SEqDw8
WOW! WOW! WOW! Did I say Wow! This is exactly what I have been looking for, a low carb bread as I am a diabetic. I did not know that arrowroot is a carb but I calculated that 1/2c. equals 72 g. of carbohydrates roughly. So not too bad. I have enjoyed every recipe I have tried so far. I can’t tell you how happy I am that I accidentally discovered your website. Keep up the good work!! I just can’t stop making everything I see. ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpygmaabb9E
I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short.
Thank you Elana for posting such a delishious bread recipe. I followed the recipe as originally posted, but I didn’t feel there was enough batter, so I made another batch and added it to the first. The only change was I added aprox. 1 tsp. of cream of tartar. I used unpasturized dark honey, but next time I will only use 1 TBS. instead of the 2 for when I double the recipe. I think 1 TBS. will be plenty enough. I also baked the loaf a little longer until it was browned because of it’s thickness. Out of the grain free breads I have experimented with in baking, this one is definately the best. The taste and texture completed my ham and cucumber sandwich.
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Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham. This book argues that the ease of digestion and the added nutritional value available in cooked food was the key behind the explosion of human intelligence. (Cooking gelatinizes starch, denatures protein, and softens all foods, permitting more complete digestion and energy extraction. As a result, the food processing apparatus shrinks, freeing energy to support a larger brain.) He then suggests that cooking led to what eventually became marriage and the sexual division of labor. The two most helpful reviews at Amazon get into great detail. The reviews average to 4+ stars.
This is great! I have tried GF bread recipes numerous times, to no avail… which was very disheartening, since I can make wonderful wheat bread without even thinking about it! But THIS recipe turned out great! It made a fluffy, moist bread that held up to slicing, holding burgers, everything you could want in a bread! And it couldn’t get any simpler to make. I doubled the recipe and baked in a loaf pan for 30min as suggested above, since I don’t have the rings, and it was great. Thank you for an awesome recipe!
The problem with substituting the eggs for something else is that the texture of your bread won’t be light and fluffy like normal wheat bread. If your son is allergic to the egg whites I would use just the yolks. But if he can’t have eggs at all, you can try using flax or chia seeds – (3 T water with 1 T ground flax seed = 1 egg). Please let me know how it goes.
Uhhh, YUM!!! I have been stalking this recipe for a couple weeks.. Finally decided to make it. Didn’t change anything except I used 3 whole eggs and 2 whites (not sure why. Thought I read in here somewhere that egg whites only will make the loaf lighter)… Anyway it’s AWESOME! So very tasty… It turned out better than even any wheat based bread I’ve tried to make in the past. This is a keeper… Especially great with Vermont cultured butter. I cut my loaf into 16 pieces. Easy to cut, way too easy to eat…. Could I add a few ripe bananas, walnuts, and Some spices and make banana bread??? I’m gonna try it!

4. Raw food is for the birds (too much of it, anyway). There’s paleo, and then there’s the raw diet. Folks who eat raw tout the health benefits of the approach, saying that they’re accessing the full, complete nutrients available because they’re not heating, and thus destroying, their dinner. But that’s simply wrong. We cook to get our hands on more nutrients, not fewer. According to Wrangham, the one thing absolutely all cultures have in common is that they cook their food. He points out that women who move towards 100 percent raw diets often stop ovulating, because even if in theory they’re tossing sufficient food into the blender to fulfill their caloric needs, they simply can’t absorb enough from the uncooked food.
I am new to walking the Primal path, but was already missing bread and sandwiches. Thanks so much for this recipe. I made it today and it came out great. After reading all the reviews about the center not baking, I inserted my oven thermometer into the center of the loaf after 25 minutes of baking. Then I set the thermometer to alarm when it reached 195 degrees F. (That is halfway between the 190 degrees I use for white bread and 200 degrees I use for banana bread.) The center was nicely baked. Hopefully this will help others who try this recipe.

Oh me… oh my. Back then, I would have pulled out the food processor, opened up my bulk bag of almonds and blended for a good 5-15 minutes ’til I got just the perfect smooth consistency of creamy almond butter. Then, carefully transfer that mess-prone goop (scientific name for nut butter consistency) into a large Tupperware, spend like 15 good minutes wiping off flecks of almond butter goop that had flown all over the kitchen, then wash all the dishes (you know how long this takes when you have almond butter grease staunchly refusing to let go of its dish territory), then dry all the dishes (because: counter space, ‘nuff said), then make these bars.
I accidentally forgot mine when my “timer” didn’t remind me. I remembered it and pulled it out after it had been in the oven an extra 13 minutes. It was almost perfect. I also just whisked vigorously as my processor is missing since the last move. I will definitely make it again, but I will likely play with it a bit as I am hoping to find a few versions to make regularly to replace my family’s usual bread. Even our most finicky eater is loving these recipes so far. Thank you!
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.

The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.


I added chia seeds to give the bread a bit of a healthy crunch, but also for the many nutritional benefits of these little wonders.  This a great low carb bread full of all my favourite low carb flours and so easy to make too.   You could add other flavours to this with herbs and spices and not be disappointed.  My next plan with this is to probably add some seeds to it.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Iut8c-yJM

Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhHk0A302YM


This rose really nicely and is pretty light and fluffy. It doesn’t have the exact same texture as wheat bread, but we thought it was close enough. My husband and I enjoyed some turkey sandwiches today, and our 3 year old loved her “PB&J” with sunflower butter. I packed everyone’s lunch in the morning, and they were still good at noon (kept in a cooler).
Made this divine loaf for the very first time this morning, following the recipe exactly. It’s already half gone! I’ve tried multiple paleo sandwich bread recipes and none of them have turned out great…except this one. It’s simply delicious. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. It’s obvious that a lot of trial and error went into perfecting it. It’s so so good!

The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqA3yHdSeSM
In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.
The most common reason that any bread falls is that it needed to bake for longer. That being said, I’ll be perfectly honest – sometimes this keto bread recipe falls anyway, even despite doing everything else right. Fortunately this isn’t a huge deal because it still tastes delicious – IF you baked it for long enough and the center is cooked through. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUvRMTnEC5M
I made this bread tonight and it turned out pretty good. It’s tender and has a good crumb. I didn’t have the problems that some had with holes or rawness in the middle. I used four eggs, subbed tapioca flour for the coconut flour since I was out of coconut, and subbed Trader Joe’s ground almond meal (I pretty much exclusively use the TJ’s almond meal when almond flour is called for, and have never had problems). The bread does taste a bit too strongly of soda for my tastebuds, so maybe baking powder would work just as well. I’ll try it next time and report here. My loaf did not rise as much as the photo shows. Comparing the size of the loaf to the jam jar (which is a typical small jam jar) and the spoon in the photo, I think the loaf was probably baked in a smaller pan than the one called for in the recipe. Thus it looks like it rose a lot when it really was just baked in a smaller pan.
Success! My very first attempt at baking “paleo”. This is very tasty and so very easy. I used the recipe with honey and coconut oil. I recently shifted my diet to low carb and no sugar, and really needed a bread that fit the new diet. This is perfect. THANK YOU for sharing the years of experience and knowledge you have with cooking Paleo. I think the size of the pan is very important to get a rise out of the mixture, so folks just follow this fool proof recipe and enjoy. I bought your recent book, Paleo Cooking, on iTunes so it is easy to have the recipe at my fingertip on my phone right there in the kitchen.
This is the best grain-free bread recipe I have ever tried. I didn’t have the loaf pan so I used one of my small casserole dishes and it came out square and a little darker around the edges. I used 1 1/2oz. of coconut oil and mixed it with 1/2oz. of melted butter and it came out really moist. It also came out dark like whole wheat bread, so I am assuming that I used just a little too much flax meal. I love you for taking the time to perfect this!!! I’m thinking of making a spice bread next time. Let you know if it works!!
Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
Weigh your ingredients. This will forever be a staple recommendation for any sort of gluten free baking here at gnom-gnom. As aside from leading to less dirty dishes, it will ensure consistent results time and time again. Remember that gluten free (and particularly keto) baking is notoriously finicky, and measuring by cups is anything but accurate. And if you don’t own a baking scale, measure with cups by dropping the ingredients onto them rather than scooping them out (which often leads to overpacking). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBt-yRHqajM
I forgot to say I used half al one flour and half sunflower seed flour.. I double the batch and I found if I let it sit for about 25 min, then put it in the oven it gets thicker as it sits and I still have to bake it for an hour. The tast is great. The next time I’m buying Honeyville flour and making it exactly like your recipe says. I’m just worried about mixing it to much. Mine is very dense and heavy. But yummy.
Another great recipe! So quick and so easy and so delicious! I used normal ground almonds, so the texture is more coarse and the bread turned out a darker than on Adriana’s pictures. I used coconut oil instead of butter and as I didn’t have enough arrowroodpowder at home I made half the amount and made muffins instead of a bread loaf. The baking time can be reduced to approx. 15 min. when making muffins.They turned out really fantastic, fluffy, moist and if you like the taste of coconut you should definitely make them with coconut oil instead of butter 🙂 I also love, that there’s no sugar involved! Thanks for sharing this recipe with us!
I just came across this recipe as I am venturing into the Paleo world, as well as looking for recipes for my daughter who has really bad eczema and is off dairy, eggs (whites), wheat and soy. Do you think an egg replacer would work OK in this recipe? I’ll probably give it a try with the replacer I got from Whole Foods, but was wondering if anyone had already tried this recipe without eggs? I don’t know if ghee will work for her if she has to be dairy-free. Would coconut oil work the same? Thanks for any help/input! 🙂
I must admit that when I read all the comments for this recipe I was so nervous to try it even though I’ve been hand-kneeding and baking my own breads without a recipe (an ancient family tradition) for over 20 years. Since I don’t have any background in gluten-free baking but recently changed to a low-carb lifestyle, I didn’t know what to expect. I noticed that a lot of people seemed to have issues with the proofing and resting of the bread dough. In order to eliminate the possibility of this happening, and since I know I understand yeast proofing really well, and knew that I won’t have an issue with dead yeast, I made sure that my kitchen temperature would be really warm so I placed a space heater on my kitchen counter facing the yeast and then later the dough as it rested. In the end, the bread turned out near perfect. The smell and taste was fabulous. The only thing I can say is that my bread pan is a 9X5 so next time I will make 1.5 the recipe. Otherwise, all I can say is this recipe is a winner!!!!
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KQgyfPixmw
Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for?
I’ve tried this recipe 3 or 4 times and had the same barely rising results. I’ve tried several ways. Most recently proofing in the instant pot where it’s a controlled warm environment. Yeast activates. All ingredients were room temperature. I don’t really feel that my yeast/egg/butter/acv mixture gets very “light and frothy” despite mixing for several minutes but other than that everything should be spot on. But if it’s the yeast that is responsible for rising then I’m not sure how that would be connected. I really wish I could see a detailed video on how this is done instead of a semi related one for a different bread. It’s too complicated a process it seems….I literally need step by step video apparently.
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
This was delicious! my husband and children (2, 4, and 6) all loved it as well! We sliced it and ate as is. I used bobs red mill almond flour since that’s all I can get here in Canada so I’m sure the texture was a bit coarser than when using honeyville, but nonetheless one of the tastiest and easiest grain free breads I’ve made! Thanks for sharing!
Thank you so much for what you are doing! I’m making my second loaf now and my family enjoyed the first one immensely. I finally was able to enjoy a poached egg on toast again. Your recipes are so easy to follow, and even substitute with. For instance I just finished baking up a ton of your “thin mints”, and was low on Almond Flour, so I just threw in what I had, about a cup, and then added a half a cup of raw Pecans to the food processor and continued as directed on the recipe. It was perfect. So since I love to experiment, I’m making my second loaf with walnuts instead of pecans. It’s rising and looking beautiful. I can’t wait to try it.
Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.
Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-QfuZ2Ddso
Hahaha! Demeter – I so so know what you mean about that almond butter grease that gets EVERYWHERE and, like you said, refuses”to let go of its dish territory” I still love making my own almond butter (mostly cos it doesn’t cost me a kidney and an arm) when I have the time – lately time has been in short supply for me – also in short supply are treats as decadent as these! You sure are a good almond-butter-making-maniac-sister to keep your sisters supplied with treats like these bars – though in the unlikely event that you end up with more of these bars than they are willing to take off your hands – well, I’d be delighted to help out! Just saying 😉

I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BiHLAQTZvI
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