I love this bread! Like many others, it needed about twice as long in the oven. I also add sunflower seeds to mine (which do turn green in subsequent days but still taste delicious!). This is a fantastic bread if you want something less eggy. It’s a little crumbly, so not really a bread to make a sandwich with, but delicious with a spread, by itself, or as an open face type sandwich. I use coconut cream in mine and Earth Balance soy free ‘butter’ to make it dairy free.
Made this divine loaf for the very first time this morning, following the recipe exactly. It’s already half gone! I’ve tried multiple paleo sandwich bread recipes and none of them have turned out great…except this one. It’s simply delicious. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. It’s obvious that a lot of trial and error went into perfecting it. It’s so so good! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uHnEN4iIaA
Thank you Lexi for this awesome, super quick recipe!!! I have been trying out so many different kinds of quick breads with clean ingredients and somehow they take longer. This is will our go to bread, so thank you!! I have tried them twice and both times were awesome! Second time I tried a little variation with adding some rolled oat flour and it did not change it in any noticeable manner. Apparently too much of almonds have disadvantages on the body. I will continue experimenting with adding a little bit of other flours but big THANK YOU for this easy tasty simple recipe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdlQxISNpwY
I finally had a chance to try this receipe yesterday. I liked the taste, but for some reason it did not rise very much. When I put all of the batter in the pan(yes, I used recommended pan), it filled only half of the pan, and after baking, it stayed almost at almost the same level. The baking soda was not old(bought 1 month ago). Does anyone know what I might have done wrong? I whisked the ingredients, instead of using food processer. Could it be a reason? Or was it because I used regular flax seed grounded by muself?

Hi Sonda, glad you like it! I use a free nutrition calculator on the website sparkrecipes.com, which generates the nutrition table. You just put in all your ingredients and number of portions and it does the rest of the work for you. I cannot guarantee whatever comes out is 100% accurate, it is thought to be a guide. If you need to rely on nutrition info for health reasons, you’d have to make your own calculations.
This way of eating has made me feel better in so many ways. I just had such a craving For the texture of cake or bread last night that I had a piece of cake and a sandwich wrap! I knew I had to find a way to satisfy that craving and considered eating a sandwich once a week. Now I can do it without too many carbs. Thanks for taking the time to make it come out right. No more carb BINGES for me.
I went gluten-free in 1998, when I was diagnosed with celiac disease. The gluten-free diet did not get the job done and my gut was still cranky. So, in 2001 I went on the paleo diet. Since then, I’ve been both gluten and grain-free, and written a ton of paleo bread recipes. All of my bread recipes are quick breads, and they’re far more nutritious, low-carb, and easy to make than regular bread. I’ve tested all of these recipes several dozen times to perfect them for you.
Weigh your ingredients. This will forever be a staple recommendation for any sort of gluten free baking here at gnom-gnom. As aside from leading to less dirty dishes, it will ensure consistent results time and time again. Remember that gluten free (and particularly keto) baking is notoriously finicky, and measuring by cups is anything but accurate. And if you don’t own a baking scale, measure with cups by dropping the ingredients onto them rather than scooping them out (which often leads to overpacking). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBt-yRHqajM
I have a question for you about eggs. Do you have any particular size or volume of “egg” that you tend to use in your recipes? In most of my cookbooks, an “egg” means a medium sized egg that yields about 50mls by volume, so there are slightly more than 5 eggs in a cup. I tend to buy extra large eggs locally, and I find that when a recipe calls for more than 3 eggs, the end result is quite “egg-y.” I’m going to experiment, but perhaps you would be able to tell me if there is a size or volume of egg that you tend to use in your recipes. (I didn’t see anything specific under the “ingredient” menu on your blog.)
I made the amended version, further substituting organic coconut sugar for the honey, and it is excellent! I made mine in a standard loaf pan in a convection oven and it reduced the baking time to 20 minutes. This is my first foray into paleo/anti-candida eating, and I’m excited at how tasty and satisfying this bread is. It is moist, dense and flavorful with a great texture. So glad I found your website!
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4j4JsvIvaQ
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…

I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfitxN3Vx24
The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoaRNAfSns8
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLoukoBs8TE
Actually, I m not talking about Wheat flour. I suggested Vital Wheat Gluten and Wheat Protein Isolate. Which are low in carbs. Vital Wheat Gluten is 4g carbs per 1/4 cup and Wheat Protein Isolate is 2 to 3g per 1/4 cup. There is actually Low Carb bread being sold out there with these ingredients now. And, Oat Fiber actually has zero carbs. So, it is Keto. Especially, that you really don’t need to use much during baking. Most used would be Almond or Coconut Flour. I am doing Keto to loose weight and get back in shape. I have no Gluten allergies. So, for those that do, this isn’t a good choice, but it is for me.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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