Oh my goodness. I’m new to your site and this is the first recipe I have tried. It really is SUCH a tasty, flavorful bread. I did make some changes. I followed a comment on your pinterest pin for this recipe, and the person who tried it recommended 1/2 tsp xanthem gum in place of 1/2 cup arrowroot powder. I did this to lower the carb count and because arrowroot was the only ingredient I was lacking. It reminds me of a somewhat sweet, but still savory wheat flavored corn muffin. I’m sorry if that’s confusing. It’s a bit more tender/crumbly than sandwich bread though, and I do think that has to do with my substitution. For this reason it might be too delicate to support a sandwich. Regardless, it’s delicious as a side in a dish. I actually prefer it that way. Thank you again for sharing. So thankful.
I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.

Made it last night and my husband & I ate the whole loaf! I used olive oil instead of palm oil, and I used arrowroot instead of tapioca flour. Also, I baked for 22min in a mini-loaf pan and let it cool for 15-20min before slicing. I got 8 small slices and they were delicious! Very fluffy and raised nicely during baking. The texture was extremely fluffy and just like any sandwich roll as you’d expect.


Just made this exactly as listed with one sub of chia seed meal (made in dry Vitamix container) for the flaxseed meal, baked extra 5 minutes. Need to jiggle it out with a flat pancake flipper as though I did oil the pan, I did not use parchment as recommended. The loaf rose well in my 8.5 x 4.5 metal loaf pan. Hope everyone here likes it! I will report back. I plan to freeze some slices too.
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum
Flatbread is a nice change of pace to ordinary loaves, and it goes really well with all sorts of meals, and you can even make a meal out of it by using it to make a sandwich. This cheesey version is made using tapioca flour, so it will have a different texture and flavor than breads made with almond flour or coconut flour. The cheese they’re using is the kind that is usually given a nod on Paleo, unless you are being very strict. Hard cheeses like asiago and parmesan are usually given a pass because they don’t include as much dairy. It’s up to you to determine what your body can handle.
This is such an excellent versatile recipe and definitely my favorite gluten-free bread recipe. I find that I’m perfectly satisfied using almond meal that of almond flour. And it has adapted well to any other kind of nut or seed meal I have tried so far. Last week I used all pecan meal is my favorite today taste wise. I also often mix half of another nut meal with half almond meal. Second favorite was half almond meal with half sunflower seed meal the taste was delicious. However the sunflower seed meal did turn green like I did read. . . Morning I may Kallof with all walnut meal and I’m sure it will turn out cause of all the work you did in creating this recipe. Also I never use a food processor I mix it all by hand and it still turns out.
Hi Michelle, some people left comments above and they made it with coconut oil and also flax as an egg replacer. They said these work well, but personally I haven’t tried it. If your daughter can have the yolk , you can separate it and just use that to make the bread. Also find out if she can have ghee because although it’s made from butter, it doesn’t contain the casein that most people react to in dairy.
The paleo diet is hot. Those who follow it are attempting, they say, to mimic our ancient ancestors—minus the animal-skin fashions and the total lack of technology, of course. The adherents eschew what they believe comes from modern agriculture (wheat, dairy, legumes, for instance) and rely instead on meals full of meat, nuts, and vegetables—foods they claim are closer to what hunter-gatherers ate.
Made this today. Came out perfectly! Hubby and son are grain free, and son has Autism which comes with food sensory issues and limited palate! My son liked this bread. It’s true that it’s not a standard slice like with traditional loaves made with wheat flour, but it’s big enough to make a sandwich still. Thanks for the great recipe! Tried to rate it but it won’t let me go up to 5 stars so rather than give you less, I’ll just not rate it officially. But….5 stars!!
So, just as I was about to put these in the oven, my 20 year old oven caught fire. After having the fire department visit, I used coconut oil spray on a glass square dish and cooked it in the microwave. Total time was about 8 minutes because I kept stopping and starting it. The recipe was delicious! Thank you to our fire department and to you for this wonderful bread alternative!
It’s so hard to find good nut-free recipes when you’re on a paleo diet. So I created this Nut-Free Flax Bread for those of you with allergies. This is another easy recipe that is made in a standard size loaf pan. Fans say they like it so much that they have to try not to snack on it all day. They’re also saying it’s an amazing bread that everyone can eat since it’s nut-free, and that it’s perfect for those with both gluten and nut allergies!

Liza, I haven’t tried this recipe using cashew flour, but if you’ve had success using a 1:1 substitution for almond flour making other bread-type recipes, I think it could work! I also haven’t tried this recipe using coconut milk, but other readers have and said it works well. Yes, please let us know how it goes if you try it with these substitutions!

According to Adrienne Rose Johnson, the idea that the primitive diet was superior to current dietary habits dates back to the 1890s with such writers as Dr. Emmet Densmore and Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. Densmore proclaimed that "bread is the staff of death," while Kellogg supported a diet of starchy and grain-based foods.[11] The idea of a Paleolithic diet can be traced to a 1975 book by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 which in 1985 was further developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his 2002 book The Paleo Diet.[8] The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[12] as is Paleo Diet, trademarked by Cordain.[13]


#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ
Since your loaf pan isn’t all that much larger, I would first just alter the cook time. This bread will probably cook a bit quicker in a slightly larger pan, so I would recommend checking it about 5 minutes sooner. However, the loaf may not rise as high as it would in a smaller pan; if you’re looking for a higher rise to your bread I would try it with 1.5 times the ingredients and an increased cook time. Please let me know how it goes if you give it a try!
I’m on a low-FODMAP diet too. I just use pumpkin puree to replace apple sauce and it works in 98% recipes. Does make things a bit orange though ;). Other substitution ideas that I’ve used in other recipes are sweet potato puree (use white sweet potato so it’s not orange), yoghurt (I make mine with coconut milk), banana puree, or I’ve used water or milk + a little ground chia or linseed (a bit like a watery chia or flax egg). Hope you find something that works for you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAZ5Z87Z55g

Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.

Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!!
As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.

I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!

Hi Jennifer, I understand all the science behind gluten baking, but honestly when it comes to keto baking (no starches, gluten, etc) the rules change completely. The bread also needs a SUBSTANTIAL amount more heat to rise than with a regular gluten bread (so while you would leave a gluten loaf on the counter and it would rise beautifully, with this one you actually need to introduce a bit more heat to get a proper rise). The bread will also only rise so much without collapsing, so the acidity doesn’t affect the rise believe it or not. But of course, you’re free to test around yourself as you clearly have the knowledge- just keep in mind that behavior varies a lot xo!
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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