The theory is our bodies were designed, and still optimized, to eat what our Paleolithic ancestors ate. Like your hunger-gatherer forefathers, on Paleo you get all the meat from wild animals and unlimited fruits and vegetables you can eat. But no starchy vegetables (like potatoes), no legumes (like lentils or beans), no wheat, and no grains (like quinoa or corn) because those plants were invented by human beings during the agricultural revolution after our Paleolithic ancestors left the planet. You get one cheat day where you can eat whatever you want (“Occasional cheating and digressions may be just what you need to help you stick to the diet.”) No oil because it puts omega 6 and omega 3 ratios out of whack which should never exceed 2:1, except olive oil if you must. Dairy is also prohibited. And meat must come from animals that weren’t fed grains (like corn) because grains lead to inflammation and increased fat.
Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.
Hi again Adriana. I tried again yesterday, with the same flour. I added a little extra yoghurt (2/3 cup) and I also added some almond milk (I think about 1/4 cup), to make more of a batter. The bread turned out great. It’s a little moist, a bit like cake, but it tastes amazing! So I actually think that the flour reacts a bit like coconut flour and soaks up a lot of moisture.
Hahaha. That’s why we’re besties. We staunchly refuse to follow the times. ???? Now what’s this all about floral curtains? Do you have a set picked out for me? Lolol. I’ve never tried Justin’s vanilla AB. But now I’m super intrigued! Yes on the overheating–AB takes a lot longer than you would think. I will label at least 100 of these cookies for you. 😉 Love ya more! <3 <3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhthf8B-xk
Meet Grok. According to his online profile, he is a tall, lean, ripped and agile 30-year-old. By every measure, Grok is in superb health: low blood pressure; no inflammation; ideal levels of insulin, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. He and his family eat really healthy, too. They gather wild seeds, grasses, and nuts; seasonal vegetables; roots and berries. They hunt and fish their own meat. Between foraging, building sturdy shelters from natural materials, collecting firewood and fending off dangerous predators far larger than himself, Grok's life is strenuous, perilous and physically demanding. Yet, somehow, he is a stress-free dude who always manages to get enough sleep and finds the time to enjoy moments of tranquility beside gurgling creeks. He is perfectly suited to his environment in every way. He is totally Zen.
This easy Paleo Bread recipe tastes great and is made with just 7 nutrient dense ingredients. That’s a good thing because “gluten-free” isn’t necessarily healthy, especially when it comes to bread. That’s why I created a gluten-free paleo bread recipe that’s made of high-protein ingredients that won’t leave you dragging. I’m loving every slice that comes from this new paleo diet friendly bread recipe.
Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up.
July 2016 I weighed 225 lbs. and was desperate for a way of eating that I could lose weight with but not starve doing so. This book contained the answers I'd been seeking for years and, in my opinion, is the perfect starter book to understanding the Paleo eating plan. By July 2017 I dropped 65 lbs., felt absolutely great, and became a strong proponent of eating this way for a lifetime. Loren Cordain keeps it simple and straight-forward, explaining the diet in an uncomplicated manner.
I made the recipe with ingredients exactly as written…no substitutions, however, based on other feedback, I cooked it an extra 10 min. It came out PERFECT (not dry). And, I did use Bob’s Red Mill almond flour. I rubbed butter on the sides of my (9x5x2.75) Bakers Secret loaf pan before putting the batter in it, and it came out compact, firm, clean, easy to slice in very thin slices, and toasts without falling apart. This definitely is the best tasting paleo/gf bread I’ve ever eaten. Mine, too, was only a couple of in. high, so I will make 1.5x the recipe, next time, to get a higher loaf. I’m thinking it will have to cook longer than the 35 min. I did for normal batch, though. QUESTION: has anyone tried any variation of this recipe using yeast? To the people who wanted to use their breadmakers, this would be the only reason to use a breadmaker (getting loaf to rise). I confess I tried this very thing the 2nd time I made the bread, but don’t have enough culinary/breadmaking skills to know why it didn’t rise more than the quick bread method (no sugar to activate the yeast more?). I substituted the baking soda for the pkt of yeast, and also added 2 tsp of xantham gum, thinking that would provide more cohesiveness for an expanding loaf, since this ingredient is often a suitable replacement for gluten in GF recipes. Maybe because I mixed all ingredients together before putting the batter in the machine’s bread pan & added yeast on top (yeast didn’t mix in too well) instead of letting the machine do the work by putting in first the wet, then dry ingredients on top of that, then finally yeast, per usual breadmaker directions. Any thoughts? Adriana, thank you so much for creating & sharing the recipe. ;o)

This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHtriY7T7sw
The Hiwi are not particularly healthy. Compared to the Ache, a hunter–gatherer tribe in Paraguay, the Hiwi are shorter, thinner, more lethargic and less well nourished. Hiwi men and women of all ages constantly complain of hunger. Many Hiwi are heavily infected with parasitic hookworms, which burrow into the small intestine and feed on blood. And only 50 percent of Hiwi children survive beyond the age of 15.
Hello!! Went grain free about two months ago to reverse a chronic illness. Am feeling great but was jonesing for a piece of bread!! Big time!! And that’s what you gave me! I wish I could share the photos I have of this loaf which baked up beautifully!! It is light and airy and tastes mild and yummy. Interestingly, when I toasted it up, a hint of coconut came out (obviously from the coconut flour). Thank you so much for sharing this… sandwich here I come!!
First off, i did this recipe totally every perfect way. Even had a warmer house. Everything was room temperature and even used the ginger and cream of tartar. I live in Kansas City so NO high elevation. My bread did not rise even near double. Maybe 1/3 it’s size and that took foreverrrrrr. Then after it was done, it sunk in half. Extremely flat bread. About 3” high. I’m so disgusted of all these new ingredients i bought for this. $75. All for nothing. I dont think i would waste my time again. I have used a few other recipes from gnom gnom and they turned out pretty good. This is a total fail. And I followed it perfectly. Even read all the other reviews. Very sad!
By latest count, about 800 Hiwi live in palm thatched huts in Colombia and Venezuela. In 1990 Ana Magdalena Hurtado and Kim Hill—now both at Arizona State University in Tempe—published a thorough study (pdf) of the Hiwi diet in the neotropical savannas of the Orinoco River basin in Southwestern Venezuela. Vast grasslands with belts of forest, these savannas receive plenty of rain between May and November. From January through March, however, precipitation is rare: the grasses shrivel, while lakes and lagoons evaporate. Fish trapped in shrinking pools of water are easy targets for caiman, capybaras and turtles. In turn, the desiccating lakes become prime hunting territory for the Hiwi. During the wet season, however, the Hiwi mainly hunt for animals in the forest, using bows and arrows. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEOLZpj1G8g

1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJRUoKMg1MQ


Optimal Diet is a dietary model of human nutrition devised and implemented by Dr. Jan Kwasniewski. Lots of fat and low in carbs. Lots and lots of articles collected from various places. He has an out-of-print book: Optimal Nutrition. The book is explained at the Australian Homo Optimus Association website. A thorough analysis is the first post here: Dr. Kwasniewski's Optimal Diet: Sanity, Clarity, Facts.
Almond flour is often considered the “all purpose” flour of the paleo baking world. It’s used to make things like bread, cakes, and cookies with good results. The only caveat I have is that using almond flour alone can result in a dense baked good, so I typically use almond flour (or almond meal) in conjunction with arrowroot starch, tapioca flour, and/or flaxseed meal to lighten up the texture.
Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yjGDjjk7OA
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Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iMM4Cx_bKk
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUNe5SEqDw8

Hi Christy, It might be a little more difficult, but in theory possible. You’d need to stir the dry ingredients, then use a hand mixer instead of food processor to mix them with the butter. Then, after beating the egg whites separately, you’d need to mix in part of them, trying not to break them down, then fold in the rest once it’s easier to fold.


I wish I had taken a photo because this bread is gorgeous! My husband (who is anti-healthy food) said “I see bread like that and I want to eat it…but since you told me it was made with almonds I won’t, out of spite”…and then 10 minutes later…”that would taste really good toasted with butter” (and a big chunk was missing from the loaf). So easy to make with ingredients I always have on hand. Bravo! I will be making this weekly!
Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!
I made this recipe tonight – definitely the best tasting paleo bread I’ve had. The bread didn’t rise very much, so maybe I’d do a double recipe and cook longer to get bigger slices. It also turned out a little on the crumbly side – I think mine needed more liquid because the batter was fairly dry when I put it in the pan. As someone mentioned above, I also like that it’s not super eggy tasting! I gave slices to my roommates and a friend (they’re not paleo) and they both thought it was really good – which is sayin’ something! Next time I will try a few tweaks to make is sandwich suitable, but this recipe is really tasty.
Closely examining one group of modern hunter–gatherers—the Hiwi—reveals how much variation exists within the diet of a single small foraging society and deflates the notion that hunter–gatherers have impeccable health. Such examination also makes obvious the immense gap between a genuine community of foragers and Paleo dieters living in modern cities, selectively shopping at farmers' markets and making sure the dressing on their house salad is gluten, sugar and dairy free.
Wowwwww!!! This is amazing. I had to change the recipe a bit (I followed the top recipe) because of lack of ingredients. I used Raw Almond Flour (not blanched); I used only three eggs + one chia egg + one flax egg; and my pan was about 8.5*4, so a bit bigger than recommended; I did not use the food processor, just mixed everything with a whisk and a spoon. Even though the pan was larger the height was great, and I’ve never had such a moist bread. Incredible! It is so delicious and wonderful. And so easy to make!! Thank you so much- I haven’t eaten anything like this since quitting gluten. This will be my go-to bread from now on.

These are AMAZING! I have celiac and was diagnosed about 4 months ago. It’s been very difficult and bread is what I miss most. Unfortunately, GF bread is not very tasty-i’ve tried a number of brands and have tried making my own. I love the simplicity of the recipe as well. Thank you for creating amazing clean recipes, your cookie bars are also fabulous!
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!

A friend made this bread with pecans or walnuts because she had no almonds. She sent me home a slice after church this last week. I did not think I missed bread…OH MY Goodness. It is SO light. I loved every bite.I am very strict paleo because of allergies and blood sugar issuses keeps me low carb Paleo. Thank you so much for the HARD work of your experimentation. Love you. Lynn
Sometimes nothing but a giant cookie will do. There’s no need to turn on the oven or share when it comes to this Paleo dessert. Coconut and almond flours bring the fiber, while a scoop of protein powder and your favorite nut butter add a whole lot of (you guessed it!) protein. Add in your favorite cookie mix-ins, like nuts or dairy-free chocolate chips, for a cookie your body will thank you for eating.

Hi Laura, can your husband have cashews? You could try making it with cashew flour. Also, some people like substituting almond flour for pumpkin seed flour, or a gluten free oat flour. These may also work, but will give the bread a unique taste and texture. Happy to hear you’re not giving up and you want to try making another bread recipe 🙂 Please let me know how it goes.
I recently found out I’m allergic to many of the foods that I’ve consumed over the years and was recently told to eat strictly Paleo……..and for someone who needs a map and directions in her own kitchen, for someone who has singlehandedly kept the restaurant business in the black, that’s a pretty big expectation. This bread has saved me and my fiance in so many of those, “I can’t do this any longer” moments when we really miss the old way of eating. We cant recommend this bread enough! Thank you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl1hgPDevnc
Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UuDFkXxEnI
Thank you so much for this recipe! I had some with my egg for breakfast and it went really well as the bread has a slightly ‘eggy’ taste. It came out exactly as your photo. Some people asked for nutrition info and I have looked at just the calories and protein which are 1096 calories per loaf and 101g protein. Obviously the slice amounts vary on how many slices you cut it into – for me 14 slices so 113 calories and 7g protein per slice.
OMG these are AMAZING!!! I’ve made them three times in the past week and my family eats them like crazy. We haven’t had “bread” since we went Paleo in June. (Not that we haven’t tried, but these are the real deal). I always double the recipe and they always turn out perfectly. I found a little loaf pan to make them in and now I have cute little loaves of bread. I love, love, love this recipe. One of my favorite things ever! Thank you.
Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat—the paleo diet is all about eating foods straight from the Earth just as our ancestors did. Those ancestors didn't have livestock or crops to call their own, so Cordain advises to go with grass-fed and organic varieties whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn't exist back then. Research from Emory University suggests that Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wc5zUK2MKNY
Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work!
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck.
Hi Tessa, almond flour is actually very moist and doesn’t soak up much moisture. It can make baked goods oily and super moist sometimes. There are many brands that sell almond flour now, but not all work well or give you the same result when baking. The brands I found work best for baking are by Honeyville and Welbee’s. I also always use the blanched flour in my recipes. What brand did you use? I am happy you like my recipe. Please let me know how it goes when you try making it again and post a photo here so I can see. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maSjPJb4rbQ
It sounds like Weevils. They make cobwebs in flour and flour baked goods and were the bane of the Sailors on long voyages for centuries. I have found using a large lidded container, plastic, metal, ceramic or whatever you have, and sprinkling Diatomaceous Earth inside and round the lid keeps all my different flours healthy and hygienic. Diatomaceous Earth is a natural silica like powder which can even be taken internally, and totally dehydrates any bugs etc leaving them very dead. I use it in my chicken run and even on my cats and in their food. It keeps them healthy and parasite free. It is a sustainable, non chemical product – just check its Food grade before buying it. I guess they seell it in the US. It’s used a lot here in the UK.

Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
It’s hard to make substitutions, but if I was to experiment with a different nut-free flour I would use pumpkin or sunflower seed flour (same amount). These may be hard to find so you can make your own. The process is the same for making almond flour and I have a video tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/
Lutein/Zeaxanthin and Macular Health is an article discussing antioxidents and protection against the oxidizing ultraviolet radiation of the sun. The best dietary sources of antioxidants in general, and carotenoids specifically, are fruits and vegetables ­ and the more brightly colored, the better. Lutein and zeaxanthin are yellow pigments found in high concentrations in yellow fruits and vegetables as well as in dark green, leafy vegetables. In particular, spinach, kale and collard greens contain high levels of these two carotenoids.

#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ
I also have had the “raw tunnel” of dough in the middle – TWICE now. I’ve followed the recipe to a “t,” except for the name brand Magic Line Pan (I do have the correct size pan though). Thanks for the tip to cover w/foil. I did it after the 30 min, but I’ll try it from the start. I also had added an extra 20 minutes. Strange ours turn out this way after reading how perfect others’ turn out?! Thanks gals! Happy baking!
Thank you – thank you – thank you!!! I LOVE this bread. I followed the recipe exactly and did have to bake an extra 10 minutes but that was the only change – and I use the small disposable aluminum bread pan (bread pops right out) This bread is wonderful…not only easy to slice but easy to slice thin and the slices hold up great in a sandwich (no matter what the filling is) and it tastes great. This is my new best bread. I told my husband that he would probably even like it but we’ll never know since it is gluten free :^)
I just made the paleo bread and I am enjoying a warm slice as I type this comment. I wanted to share that I substituted pure maple syrup for the honey and used a blender to mix since I don’t own a food processor. The loaf still came out delicious and moist. I wish I could submit a picture of my wonderful looking loaf. Thanks for sharing your recipes.

Yes, if you bake this as muffins you will need to adjust the cooking time. If it’s a regular oven, start checking it around 15 min, if you have a convection oven, start checking them around 12 min. Also the size of your muffin tins will affect the outcome so if yours are smaller, just keep an eye on them and when they smell good and look done, start testing them with a toothpick. If it comes out clean, they are done.
This is the best grain-free bread recipe I have ever tried. I didn’t have the loaf pan so I used one of my small casserole dishes and it came out square and a little darker around the edges. I used 1 1/2oz. of coconut oil and mixed it with 1/2oz. of melted butter and it came out really moist. It also came out dark like whole wheat bread, so I am assuming that I used just a little too much flax meal. I love you for taking the time to perfect this!!! I’m thinking of making a spice bread next time. Let you know if it works!!

1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJRUoKMg1MQ

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