I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-u8kW-OlqQ
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
I’ve tried this recipe 3 or 4 times and had the same barely rising results. I’ve tried several ways. Most recently proofing in the instant pot where it’s a controlled warm environment. Yeast activates. All ingredients were room temperature. I don’t really feel that my yeast/egg/butter/acv mixture gets very “light and frothy” despite mixing for several minutes but other than that everything should be spot on. But if it’s the yeast that is responsible for rising then I’m not sure how that would be connected. I really wish I could see a detailed video on how this is done instead of a semi related one for a different bread. It’s too complicated a process it seems….I literally need step by step video apparently.
I recently found out I’m allergic to many of the foods that I’ve consumed over the years and was recently told to eat strictly Paleo……..and for someone who needs a map and directions in her own kitchen, for someone who has singlehandedly kept the restaurant business in the black, that’s a pretty big expectation. This bread has saved me and my fiance in so many of those, “I can’t do this any longer” moments when we really miss the old way of eating. We cant recommend this bread enough! Thank you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl1hgPDevnc
Pros – I basically threw this together while two toddlers screamed for my attention (I have no idea what got into them today). My almond flour was clumpy and I didn’t know how to fix it (first time baking with it), I don’t have a mixer so I used a whisk, and I forgot the ground flax until after it was in the pan and had to take the batter out and add it. Yet it turned out. And it tastes great, and it slices! I used the 4 eggs, 1 tsp baking soda and 35 min comment as a guide.
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
Trying to devise an ideal diet by studying contemporary hunter-gatherers is difficult because of the great disparities that exist; for example, the animal-derived calorie percentage ranges from 25% for the Gwi people of southern Africa to 99% for the Alaskan Nunamiut.[40] Descendants of populations with different diets have different genetic adaptations to those diets, such as the ability to digest sugars from starchy foods.[40] Modern hunter-gatherers tend to exercise considerably more than modern office workers, protecting them from heart disease and diabetes, though highly processed modern foods also contribute to diabetes when those populations move into cities.[40]
As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.
I’ve put together a roundup of 45 (that’s a lot!) recipes for Paleo-friendly / Paleo desserts. These will definitely come in handy for special occasions, birthdays, holidays, or for Wednesday night emergencies. I’m sorry Whole30 hasn’t completely changed my way of thinking yet… Let’s be real. I’m just being a realist and planning ahead, I know there will be days with chocolate in the forecast.
Here is a way to keep Paleo fun by making a batch of Paleo pretzels. It gets boring sometimes eating a certain way, and adding novelty treats like this really makes it seem like you’re not on a diet at all. Half the fun is making these, as you don’t have to stick to the conventional pretzel shape, and can wind them into any design you wish. The other half is eating them, and there’s no worries here, since all of the ingredients conform to the parameters set by the Paleo OK foods list, a combination of coconut flour and almond flour.
Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6]
ok my bread did not quite look like this.it had ammonia scents. serious…. seriously working recipes….open to suggestion…my husband’s mum was a a baker…..I fail at every attempt to provide. Your assistance is helpful.thx I am the ever so lucky lin..plan to stay lucky….(ps do this b/c my bs is borderline.fasting bs +90……..and though, my spouse refuses to acknowledge it he has issues as wel).180 after a mango whatever…I love this man, and plan to keep him with me. forever….pls assist..so tired of numbers that are compromised….bull ..we are a unique community because we care…many others are impacted, they just do not connect… We are the only people who appear to care about what elevated glucose does to people….I care for my mum…….she is blind…..confused……multiple strokes..pls, keep helping…Mom was a pilot, a photograhpher, an independent woman from the age of 15. Now, she lves in a bedroom, vision gone, and momory deplleted…….life does not have to end this way. She loves your recipes……I prep them……you have made her happy…love, lucky lin………..
Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat by Nell Stephenson. Paleoista is not only a how-to book, it is also a glimpse into the life of a woman who gives advice on how to eat this way, and lives the life, day in and day out. The author's websites: NellStephenson.com Nutrition & Fitness and Paleoista.com. To be published May 1, 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mgiY1oLE-g

To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young by Loren Cordain. The author shows you how to supercharge the Paleo diet for optimal lifelong health and weight loss. Featuring a new prescriptive 7-day plan and surprising revelations from the author's original research, it's the most powerful Paleo guide yet. Published December 20, 2011.
Overall flavor: Spot on yummy!!!! The bread is light and moist, and holds up well to a nice slice. A tad on the “oily” side, but as stated I did not use blanched flour so that may be the contributing factor. Will update when I make another batch using either a fine milled version of the almond meal I have or am able to purchase the Honeyville Almond Flour. This reminds me a tad of Irish Soda Bread, in its density and tenderness!! Can’t wait for it to cool entirely so I can make a sandwich. Perhaps Goat Cheese with Heirloom Maters and Basil!!!!
Thank you so much for this recipe! I had some with my egg for breakfast and it went really well as the bread has a slightly ‘eggy’ taste. It came out exactly as your photo. Some people asked for nutrition info and I have looked at just the calories and protein which are 1096 calories per loaf and 101g protein. Obviously the slice amounts vary on how many slices you cut it into – for me 14 slices so 113 calories and 7g protein per slice.
I just made version #2, and it was delicious. My pan was slightly larger, but I kept the 30 minute cooking time. It came out more golden brown on the outside, but it was perfectly moist. This is SO much tastier than store loaves, and I love slicing it thick. I greased my pan with butter and coconut oil and lined it with wax paper on the bottom, and it slipped right out.

I wrote a book called The Paleo Solution which went on to become a New York Times Bestseller. This book incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology to help you look, feel and perform your best. I am a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat and pocket protector for a whistle and a stopwatch to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world. With my unique perspective as both scientist and coach you will learn how simple nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can radically change your appearance and health for the better.
Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by William Davis, MD. A renowned cardiologist explains how eliminating wheat from our diets can prevent fat storage, shrink unsightly "wheat belly" bulges, and reverse myriad health problems, like minor rashes and high blood sugar. The author contends that every single human will experience health improvement by giving up modern wheat. The book provides readers with a user-friendly, step-by-step plan to navigate a new, wheat-free lifestyle. Informed by cutting-edge science and nutrition, along with case studies from men and women who have experienced life-changing transformations in their health after waving goodbye to wheat. The author's blog. Published August 30, 2011.
I was hesitant at first to try to make the bread because I didn’t want to waste the expensive ingredients. Well the bread taste even better. It doesn’t have any eggy flavor. It actually taste better than any paleo bread I’ve ever had. It was a little dense and didn’t rise as much but it was a first try with seed flour. I did have a reaction from the seeds and the baking soda. Green spots lol. My neighbor said it was the best I have ever made. It will need some tweaking. So Adriana if you find a better way to make this rise better please let me know. It was also a little greasy but just a little. I. Trying pumpkin seeds next. Thank you so much for giving us a great bread recipe that is so versitile. if anyone finds a way to improve this please let me know. You will be very happy if you try this with sunflower seed flour.
I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
Add yeast and maple syrup (to feed the yeast, see notes) to a large bowl. Heat up water to 105-110°F, and if you don't have a thermometer it should only feel lightly warm to touch. Pour water over yeast mixture, cover bowl with a kitchen towel and allow to rest for 7 minutes. The mixture should be bubbly, if it isn't start again (too cold water won't activate the yeast and too hot will kill it). 
Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz's work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz's 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2FnMGEOxiU
Finally, here’s a couple of tips for making my paleo bread recipes. Use the recommended ingredients, i.e., when the recipe calls for almond flour, don’t use almond meal, as it won’t work in the recipe and the results will be poor. In addition, use the recommended brands of ingredients. You can find those be clicking on the green text in the ingredients portion of each recipe. Additionally, use the specific pan sized called for in each of these recipes. If the pan you use is bigger than the pan I recommend, your bread will be flat.
Hmm thanks got the answer :). My fitness pal and other nutritional sites seem to give different values. Thanks for the recipe I have been preparing this bread even before I started following Keto. And when started following keto now, was craving for bread and suddenly I reminisced a bread which was very delicious and I prepared in jiffy. I came trailing back my foot steps and landed in your website again after many months.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
Since your loaf pan isn’t all that much larger, I would first just alter the cook time. This bread will probably cook a bit quicker in a slightly larger pan, so I would recommend checking it about 5 minutes sooner. However, the loaf may not rise as high as it would in a smaller pan; if you’re looking for a higher rise to your bread I would try it with 1.5 times the ingredients and an increased cook time. Please let me know how it goes if you give it a try!

Once your yeast is proofed, add in the egg, egg whites, lightly cooled melted butter (you don't want to scramble the eggs or kill the yeast!) and vinegar. Mix with an electric mixer for a couple minutes until light and frothy. Add the flour mixture in two batches, alternating with the sour cream, and mixing until thoroughly incorporated. You want to mix thoroughly and quickly to activate the xanthan gum, though the dough will become thick as the flours absorb the moisture. 
I just wanted to mention, because I don’t believe it has come up yet, that I substituted ground sunflower seeds for the almond flour (they are much cheaper and I have successfully used them in many almond flour recipes!) however I noticed something very odd this time… the bread was green when it came out of the oven! I was stumped, but after some research, found out that baking soda reacts with the chlorophyll in sunflower seeds and turns them green.
Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin.

On Wednesday, April 26, 2017 my daughter and I drove to Julian Bakery in Oceanside. It is in a business park and easy to locate. They have a small storefront bakery where they have a few items out to purchase, the bread is actually in the back, and I assume so is most of their other items. They bake on Monday and Tuesday, which is why I chose to go on Wednesday. I wanted freshly made bread and all the bread at the other stores must be kept in the freezer because they are moist and would spoil too quickly otherwise. March 24 I was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer and found out from David Getoff’s website that Paleo bread was the only bread that he would recommend if you HAD to have bread. There are no grains used in Paleo bread and they use Stevia if a sweetener is needed. The bread is more like a banana nut or zucchini bread, moist. It does well in the toaster, but I like the moistness of the bread and sometimes it in plain. (Grains, including all rice, potatoes, etc. turn rapidly into sugar which is BAD for people with cancer. Cancer cells have 9500 receptor sites, while normal cells only have four. Sugar keeps the body in an acid state, which is how cancer can expand so rapidly. ALL microwaved foods turn acidic. Anything fried has a pH level of 4 and below (BAD). Cancer LOVES sugar and fat. So my diet has changed. You can store the bread in the frig for up to 4 weeks. It freezes for about twelve months. The bread is organic and non-gmo. I have been eating mostly organic for quite awhile now and now that I REALLY need to change my diet . . . I will be coming to the Julian Bakery MUCH more in the future!! Elizabeth is a wonderful help, very informative! (She is NOT the person that you speak to on the phone – that person is in another building, in customer service.) This is a little out of the way for me (35 minute drive) but well worth it!! Thank you Julian Bakery!! They also have things for Pegan and something else, but I did not really pay attention because I have to go Paleo . . . 🙂


Hi Julia, If you use a larger size pan than I indicate for the recipe, your batter won’t fill it up and your loaf will be flat. Another example is if you fill a 1/2 cup with 1/2 cup of water, the water comes to the top of the cup, if you transfer that 1/2 cup of water to a 1 cup measuring cup, it will only fill it halfway. That’s what’s happening to the bread when the pan used it too large :-)


Cordain admits that meat leads to plaque and increases cholesterol where plants wouldn’t. And science establishes that plaque and cholesterol lead to heart attacks and strokes. But Cordain argues that plaque alone is insufficient to cause harm. Rather, it is plaque combined with inflammation that causes heart attacks and strokes. So avoid acid, salt, legumes, wheat, starchy vegetables, dairy, oil, fatty meats, and grains because they cause inflammation. But if both science and Cordain agree that plaque is a necessary part of the heart-disease equation—and that meat causes plaque—why should we follow Paleo rather than just forgo meat?
I too think it’s funny how many people basically ask permission to do substitutions, as if the recipe police will come down on them or something, or like you eluded to that maybe you can predict the exact outcome of every possible substitution. Victim of your own success!! : ) You are pretty good Elana so we won’t be surprised if you develop baking clairvoyance. Thank you for this recipe, after going Paleo this year I’ve really wanted to find some baking recipes I could feel good about eating. Excited to try this!!!
The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.
Paleo eating lends itself to sandwiches, but many Paleo dieters go without because they think they can’t have bread. But with this bread specifically made to accommodate a sandwich, you can’t go wrong. Just make sure your sandwich is piled high with meat and vegetables, the two staples of the Paleo method of eating. The ingredients list on this bread is amazing, with real wholesome ingredients, and nothing artificial used. Coconut flour gets the call as the wheat replacement, and there’s even flax used so you’re getting a dose of omega-3s.
Shandeline, if you use a larger size pan than I indicate for the recipe, your batter won’t fill it up and your loaf will be flat. An example is if you fill a 1/2 cup with 1/2 cup of water, the water comes to the top of the cup, if you transfer that 1/2 cup of water to a 1 cup measuring cup, it will only fill it halfway. That’s what’s happening to the bread when the pan used it too large. I’m so glad that the bread tasted wonderful!
Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUNe5SEqDw8
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