Coconut flour is a great alternative when you need to avoid almond flour because of a nut allergy, or for any other reason. With a couple easy tips, coconut flour can also yield delicious gluten free baked goods. Coconut flour is very high in fiber and subsequently absorbs a lot of liquid, so as a general rule, it’s recommended to use the coconut flour and liquid at the same ratio. Coconut flour can also result in very dense and/or dry and crumbly baked goods, so it’s important not to use too much coconut flour, and to use other ingredients to lighten the texture. This is why a lot of recipes that call for coconut flour also call for a lot of eggs. However, then the issue is that the baked goods have an overly eggy taste. Because of this, I prefer to use coconut flour in conjunction with other paleo-friendly flours instead of using it on its own.
This episode of Inquiring Minds, a podcast hosted by best-selling author Chris Mooney and neuroscientist and musician Indre Viskontas, is guest-hosted by Cynthia Graber. It also features a discussion of the new popular physics book Trespassing on Einstein’s Lawn, by Amanda Gefter, and new research suggesting that the purpose of sleep is to clean cellular waste substances out of your brain.
Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
I made this bread about a week ago and it turned out great. I used an 8″ x 4″ x 2-1/4″ disposable aluminum loaf pan that I got at the 99 cent store. The size pan was perfect and the loaf turned out great. I also used Extra Large Eggs, so I only used 4 of them instead of 5. I love the texture and it toasts up very nicely and I have used it as sandwich bread. Thanks for the great recipe.
Thanks for the reply Adriana. What I meant by a quick mix in the Vitamix was that I “Vitamixed” it one more time to be positive it was as fine as could be. I keep almonds frozen and I use them up over time to make milk, then dehydrate the pulp and then turn it into flour. I will have to think about buying the flour already made again…seems like I’d be going backwards in my slow but steady journey of making the most of my whole ingredients. I wonder if blanched flour would work better…I’ve read that the the only difference with the skins is the little brown specks that don’t bother me. I may try again at some point.

In low carb and keto baking, we’re concerned with two things: 1) keeping carbs low, and 2) still achieving a baked good that has great flavor and texture (because if we can’t gag it down there’s just no point, right? Lol). Low carb bread recipes are usually gluten free and grain free (although we’ve seen a couple that use oat fiber), but then the challenge is to get creative to get the right combination of ingredients to yield something that rises properly and tastes good.
As for the mixing…I mixed the dry ingredients in one bowl, then separated the egg yolks and whites, in bowls. I whipped the whites until they were thick. I added the yolks to the whites, and added the honey and oil. I mixed that up. I added the wet to the dry and mixed. It was really thick. Then I combined the baking soda and vinegar, mixing them. I added them to the whole mix and slightly stirred.
Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvA68vYZtDE
Hi Michelle, some people left comments above and they made it with coconut oil and also flax as an egg replacer. They said these work well, but personally I haven’t tried it. If your daughter can have the yolk , you can separate it and just use that to make the bread. Also find out if she can have ghee because although it’s made from butter, it doesn’t contain the casein that most people react to in dairy.
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
More than a little into running and paleo recipes (yoga now too!) but I'm not here to rain on your grains (or anything else) so come along for the ride! I do a little too much of everything (except cleaning), and I enjoy laughing at myself. As long as I'm the one making the jokes, that is. Just kidding. So bring me your angst, your appetite and your frying pan and climb aboard!
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
I completely omitted the palm shortening and didn’t replace it with anything – I can’t tell that anything’s missing. I also doubled the recipe and put it all in one loaf pan like some others did and baked it for 30 minutes. Even the hubs, who is truly a bread addict, really likes this recipe! I think they’re kind of English Muffiny and I toast the slices for sandwiches. Gluten gives me eczema and I never thought I’d get a good sandwich bread again. Thank you! 🙂
So what does the science say about the paleo diet? Some research suggests that the health claims hold truth. A review analyzed four randomized, controlled trials with 159 participants, and researchers found that the paleo diet led to more short-term improvements in some risk factors for chronic disease (including waist circumference and fasting blood sugar) compared with other control diets. (4)
So this is really good. Even my non paleo husband enjoyed it. I have to say I’m very glad it’s a forgiving recipe though. I had some weird internet glitch and I started making this recipe but the ingredients were off so I reloaded my page and then the correct ingredients came up. But by then I had already put 6 eggs and too much salt. Still delicious! I used tapioca because i didn’t have arrowroot. Thank you for sharing!
Wendy, I’m just a grandma, who has not experienced your issues, but I wonder what else your son eats. does he eat apple sauce? try making a bread with coconut flour, eggs and let him add apple sauce to it. the apple sauce will provide sweetness, the coconut flour is said to offer more of a normal bread consistency, the eggs bind the coconut flour together. remember that coconut flour is VERY absorbent. you only need a little. I’m going to suggest microwave muffins in a cup so you don’t have to make so much only to have him reject it. here is a sample recipe for you to try.
Thank you for the terrific recipe. I must admit that this really turned out to be “oopsie bread” for me. Due to the expensive nature of the recipe (organic eggs, almond flour, grass fed butter) I really attempted to follow the recipe perfectly instead of going with my usual improvisational style. I also do not have a food processor however that did not impede anything… a hand mixer and a deft hand did the trick. I did add the optional xanthum gum and erythritol but not the cream of tartar. The batter filled my silicone loaf pan to the top, I smoothed it out and popped it into the oven. Then, to my horror, I saw the little pot of melted butter still on the stovetop. There was nothing to be done except cross my fingers and hope for the best.
Evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk writes that the idea that our genetic makeup today matches that of our ancestors is misconceived, and that in debate Cordain was "taken aback" when told that 10,000 years was "plenty of time" for an evolutionary change in human digestive abilities to have taken place.[4]:114 On this basis Zuk dismisses Cordain's claim that the paleo diet is "the one and only diet that fits our genetic makeup".[4] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwP8C9wjYaY
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfDrmTzbLSM
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!
I am new to the Paleo and gluten free eating. I think I am on day 4 and so far I feel amazing. Anyway I just wanted to let you know that I made this bread this morning and it was DELICIOUS! It smelled absolutely wonderful as it baked. I could barely wait for it to cool before cutting into it. Truly a delicious bread! Now I just need to stop myself from eating the entire loaf!
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn1DcZKU53A

In light of Paleo's low ranking in US News & World Report, it stands to reason why most RDs don't advocate the diet—and for a variety of reasons. "The Paleo diet has a lot of good things going for it. It recommends excluding processed foods and refined sugars and emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and lean protein," says Heather Mangieri, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Fueling Young Athletes. However, Mangieri says, "Any diet that suggests eliminating an entire food group can set you up for nutritional deficiencies, boredom, and an overfocus on food." Because the diet eliminates all dairy, meeting calcium and vitamin D requirements can be difficult. Mangieri has experienced this issue firsthand in her private practice. "Even though Paleo proponents claim they can meet their calcium needs from nondairy foods, I have yet to find a client that eats that many greens and is that thought out in their eating. Supplementation becomes a must to meet the needs for these nutrients."
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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