I went to buy Xanthan gum at a store in my little town and it was like $17! I wasn’t paying that much, so I made it without but I will be ordering some online. I followed your directions exactly (minus Xanthan) and used Swerve for the sweetener. I couldn’t wait for it to cool so I had a piece right after it came out of the oven, it was delicious! I find it a tad sweet for bread, but that’s ok I’ll just cut back on the sweetener if I want to eat it for a sandwich..all sweeteners are a little different. It had a beautiful crust on it and was a tiny bit crumbly, almost reminds me more of muffin texture, I’m thinking maybe the Xanthan will give it more of a chewy bread texture? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAR9kTenQyE
The Vibram Fivefingers KSO Trek is a more rugged version of the popular KSO. Made from K-100 high performance kangaroo leather, the KSO Trek boasts extreme strength for excellent durability; amazing breathability; perspiration resistance to prevent sweat damage and prolong shoe life; and features MicrobloK anti-microbial treatment. These Vibram shoes are made for rugged outdoor use, providing grip and traction over a variety of surfaces. Additionally, the individual toe pockets separate and strengthen toes to improve balance, agility, and range of motion; while the thin EVA midsole and Vibram Performance rubber outsole allows your feet to move the way nature intended. The Vibram FiveFingers KSO Trek Shoes are perfect for light trekking, trail running, fitness walking, and travel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Isfh0AtkZd0
I just made this bread tonight and all I can say is WOW! I have had the ingredients for a couple of weeks but have been afraid that it wouldn’t turn out. I should have made it the day I had everything. Thank you for the detailed instructions…I just have a couple of questions…I did find that it was a little salty, can i reduce or leave out the salt? Second, you say in the narrative before the recipe that you can you arrowroot flour for a lighter crumb…do you mean the bread will not be as dense? Thank you, Thank you for your recipes….I’m on to try the ravioli’s for tomorrow nights dinner…
The Paleo Diet Cookbook: More than 150 recipes for Paleo Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Snacks, and Beverages by Loren Cordain. Also contains two weeks of meal plans and shopping and pantry tips. Helps you lose weight and boost your health and energy by focusing on lean protein and non-starchy vegetables and fruits. Note that this is a very low-fat book and is being marketed as such. Published December 7, 2010.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.

This might just be the sweetest news you receive all day: Desserts don't need to go extinct if you're following a paleo diet. Sure, the caveman-inspired meal plan eschews sugar, but these 10 inventive bloggers found creative (and delicious!) ways to make your cravings go the way of the dinosaurs. Preheat your ovens now and prepare to enjoy some tasty paleo desserts.
We made the mix as directed. We then mixed 1/2 cup coconut sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a separate container. Pour 1/2 of the bread mix in the pan, followed by 1/2 of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then put the rest of the bread mix in the pan and cover with the rest of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then swirl with a knife. Great bread for having with stew or soup!
But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food.

Made this tonight, and it came out delicious!! I subbed in grapeseed oil for the coconut oil, and used ground chia seed instead of the flax, because they are what I had on hand, and it is wonderful. Nice “whole grain” texture and nutty taste, so yummy just spread with good butter. Will definitely be making this again! I’m mostly Paleo, and LOVE your almond flour and coconut flour recipes, delicious and grain free. Thank you so much.
I was told by someone.I offered these to that they remknded her of a “sweet hawaiin roll”(i made them in square brownie compartment pans) so i played with recipe and used a coarser fround almond meal and added aome ground flax seed for.a heartier, “grainier”texture. I also replaced the tapioca with arrowroot for less.sweetness and used avocado oil in place of coconut oil. The result? An amazing “multigrain” knockoff!
I’ve made these twice now. First time – subbed coconut oil for the palm shortening – simply because I didn’t have any. Only had one egg so used a “chia” egg as well. Baked them in ramekins. Turned out wonderful!! Second time – baked them this morning – needed an “muffin” for my egg/kale breaky. This time used “tenderfake” – lard – again no palm shortening – used 2 real, free range, organic eggs. Baked them in standard muffin tins – once again – turned out beautifully! Especially when toasted 🙂
I am not over weight. I am quite small actually. Maybe just need to tone up. I have severe fibromyalgia. After my doctor and I have done tons of research and learning more and more about it we found that I need to cut out a bunch of stuff that I consume to help lower my inflammation, exhaustion and digestive problems. Very frustrating. After more research I have learned that the Paleo “diet” is pretty spot on to how I know have to eat. I am so grateful to have a guidline to follow and not doing this alone. I am tired of being in chronic pain everyday all day. Along with other things I am doing to help my body be restored Paleo sounds to be a promising adventure. I’ll make sure to post after a month or two to tell you if my heath has improved. Thank you for putting the extra effort into putting out the information for us.
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQHKYa_Zsvw
Hi Sonda, glad you like it! I use a free nutrition calculator on the website sparkrecipes.com, which generates the nutrition table. You just put in all your ingredients and number of portions and it does the rest of the work for you. I cannot guarantee whatever comes out is 100% accurate, it is thought to be a guide. If you need to rely on nutrition info for health reasons, you’d have to make your own calculations.
And now we know that microbes, such as those in our gut, play a key role in our health, as well. The microbes we eat in foods like pickles may not take up a permanent home in our innards; rather, they seem to be more akin to transient visitors, says Pollan. Still, “fermented foods provide a lot of compounds that gut microbes like,” and he says he makes sure to eat some fermented vegetables every day. 

Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvA68vYZtDE
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool?
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea.
I finally had a chance to try this receipe yesterday. I liked the taste, but for some reason it did not rise very much. When I put all of the batter in the pan(yes, I used recommended pan), it filled only half of the pan, and after baking, it stayed almost at almost the same level. The baking soda was not old(bought 1 month ago). Does anyone know what I might have done wrong? I whisked the ingredients, instead of using food processer. Could it be a reason? Or was it because I used regular flax seed grounded by muself?
Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIWMOrBumSk
How many eggs did you use when you increased it by 50%? I had a mini loaf pan that was 3 1/2″ by 6″ It came put great but when I got to the center of the loaf I did find a small spot that was still raw dough. Not enough to ruin the loaf though. I used a combination of Bob’s Red Mill almond flour and King Arthur almond flour. Anxious to try it in a full sized loaf pan though if I can figure out how many eggs to use. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po3If8ARqDQ
Thanks for asking (kinda). Back in the day, about two years ago, I baked nonstop. I baked even more than I do now that I have a food blog (which is A LOT). Every day, I would make 4-6 batches of cookies. Then, I’d make nice cream (which was called banana soft serve back then), meal prep for the next two weeks, then spend the night putting together packages for my sisters.
Just tasted this….excellent. Much fluffier than 2.0, though similar in flavor. I used coconut palm sugar syrup (boiled 1/2c water, added 1c organic coconut palm sugar, reduced heat for 3 min until dissolved, let cool before using, store in mason jar in fridge) which I use to replace any sweetener in baking…agave, honey, etc. Worked great in this as well. So moist too. Awesome texture! Thanks Elana!
Hi John, You could possible try a hand mixer in a bowl instead of the food processor, but I haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for the results. Most likely the bread would not be as tall because the mixer would completely deflate the first half of the egg whites when you add them to the batter. The second half should be folded so that part will be find. If you try with a bowl and hand mixer, let me know how that goes.
Hi Gabriel, thank you! I think using bananas in this recipe will not work in place of the arrowroot. Although the bananas are also a starch, it will add moisture and affect the overall texture and taste. You could maybe substitute the yogurt for the bananas, but again the taste of your bread will be different. I have a few banana bread recipes on this blog. Do a search for banana bread to find them.
And the one thing to keep in mind is that your bread will likely fall slightly post bake. Blame it on the lack of starch (keto flours are notoriously heavy and moist) and certain missing proteins (think gluten). Just keep in mind that we’re baking at ridiculously high altitude here, so if our loaf was still nearly double it’s volume after cooling- odds are yours will be even better!
The China Study is frequently cited when criticizing the Paleo Diet – focusing on a vegetarian diet and consuming rice is healthier than the Paleo Diet. I respectfully disagree with that nutritional philosophy and strongly disagree with the conclusions drawn from that book [7], and will leave you to make your own conclusions based on your own self-experimentation.

I made this bread recipe today using the ingredients shown in the recipe. Since I don’t own small sized bread pans I cooked this in my enamelled cast iron LeCreuset Pate Terrine with a parchment paper liner. It made a long low loaf, perfect for smaller sandwiches or for hors d’oeuvres with a gorgeous crust. I was a little worried about the coconut oil taste being dominant in the bread but thankfully, it wasn’t. I sprinkled raw sunflower seeds all the way down the top of the loaf. I poured some apple cider vinegar into my tablespoon but finished off the amount with boiled cider to add to the apple flavor.

Paleonutrition by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
If you Google the term "Paleo diet," you'll get more than 22 million hits in a split second, showing an array of Paleo blogs, recipes, articles, and books on the diet. A 2013 survey of more than 500 RDs, conducted by Today's Dietitian and Pollock Communications, a public relations firm in New York City, showed that dietitians predicted the Paleo diet as the top diet trend for the upcoming year.1 At the start of 2017, the Paleo diet was still maintaining its popularity among dieters. An independent survey conducted by Google and Green Chef, an organic meal kit delivery service, found that based on anecdotal behavior of 1,045 customers, the Paleo diet appealed to 20% of participants.2 Furthermore, 25% of survey participants aged 18 to 34 said they were more likely to try the diet compared with 11% of respondents aged 55 and older.
I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!
I must admit that when I read all the comments for this recipe I was so nervous to try it even though I’ve been hand-kneeding and baking my own breads without a recipe (an ancient family tradition) for over 20 years. Since I don’t have any background in gluten-free baking but recently changed to a low-carb lifestyle, I didn’t know what to expect. I noticed that a lot of people seemed to have issues with the proofing and resting of the bread dough. In order to eliminate the possibility of this happening, and since I know I understand yeast proofing really well, and knew that I won’t have an issue with dead yeast, I made sure that my kitchen temperature would be really warm so I placed a space heater on my kitchen counter facing the yeast and then later the dough as it rested. In the end, the bread turned out near perfect. The smell and taste was fabulous. The only thing I can say is that my bread pan is a 9X5 so next time I will make 1.5 the recipe. Otherwise, all I can say is this recipe is a winner!!!!

I just went through a big move and definitely got out of my paleo rhythm 🙁 I decided it was time to kick my butt back into it and scoured the web for a great paleo bread recipe. I found yours and it had so many great reviews so I had to give it a shot– I’m SO glad I did! I made this bread tonight and it’ turned out awesome! The taste is amazing and the texture is absolutely perfect! My roommates who aren’t paleo loved it so much as well! I can’t wait to try more of your recipes 🙂

Oh me… oh my. Back then, I would have pulled out the food processor, opened up my bulk bag of almonds and blended for a good 5-15 minutes ’til I got just the perfect smooth consistency of creamy almond butter. Then, carefully transfer that mess-prone goop (scientific name for nut butter consistency) into a large Tupperware, spend like 15 good minutes wiping off flecks of almond butter goop that had flown all over the kitchen, then wash all the dishes (you know how long this takes when you have almond butter grease staunchly refusing to let go of its dish territory), then dry all the dishes (because: counter space, ‘nuff said), then make these bars.


Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!
I made this for the first time today. I’m guessing here, but you may have mixed it too well, meaning the gas produced by the baking soda/yogurt/vinegar mixture was spent by the time you got it into the pan. No reaction means no gas, no gas means no lift. (I gently folded mine together and the rise brought it up above the top of the pan, just in the middle, but still.)
I omitted the flax meal (because it’s not an ingredient I keep on hand) as well as the honey (because I am on a sweetener-free/fruit-free program right now to try to break my addiction to sugar), and it turned out a bit salty-tasting, but otherwise, great! Next time I will play around with decreasing the salt/baking soda or add vanilla to help with the salty taste.
Hi Trish, did mix whole flax seeds in the batter as opposed to using golden ground flaxseed meal? This changes the texture. Also, the loaf pan you used seems larger and that’s why your bread is not as tall. You can either use this pan you have and double the recipe or make it in an 8×4-inch pan like I do here. Did you make any other modifications to the recipe? Happy you like the taste!

I have all the seeds but sesame seeds. I just have a small jar of those for using on top of things. Which of the other seeds could I use instead? Or, maybe chia seeds in a smaller amount? I also have a 3 seed mix with chia, flax and hemp. It really looks great! I haven’t had a lot of success with other keto, low carb breads. Want to give this a try. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWK8Q6VG20o
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