Thank you so much for all the work you do on recipes. I had been craving – really really craving – a sandwich. Somehow, having a sandwich, even more than having a pizza, or a piece of cake or pie, seems “normal” to me. So, I finally got all the ingredients, and made your bread. I used egg whites and a couple of whole eggs, and they ended up being more liquid that you used, so I had to leave the bread in the oven quite a bit longer than 30 minutes. But when it came out, and finally cooled, I had a sandwich. Thank you so much.
Hi Jen, It sounds like it needed to bake for longer – this is why it sunk and was still moist. The timing varies by ovens and even different pans. I hope you’ll try it again and just keep it in there for longer. You can cover the top if it starts to brown too much. For the one you made, depending on how moist it was in the middle, you may be able to salvage it somewhat by pan frying the slices.
Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier.
I had the same problem. Everything blended beautifully, rose in oven, then fell. Toothpick came out clean after 45 min of baking. I let it cool and then cut into it this morning and it has raw spots throughout the loaf. I am so disappointed because I killed a dozen eggs to make it and really don’t want to do it again. I wonder if the oven needs to be warmer and the cooking time needs to be increased?
Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy (Your California Rights)for more information. Ad Choices | EU Data Subject Requests
I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.
Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!!
Coconut flour is a great alternative when you need to avoid almond flour because of a nut allergy, or for any other reason. With a couple easy tips, coconut flour can also yield delicious gluten free baked goods. Coconut flour is very high in fiber and subsequently absorbs a lot of liquid, so as a general rule, it’s recommended to use the coconut flour and liquid at the same ratio. Coconut flour can also result in very dense and/or dry and crumbly baked goods, so it’s important not to use too much coconut flour, and to use other ingredients to lighten the texture. This is why a lot of recipes that call for coconut flour also call for a lot of eggs. However, then the issue is that the baked goods have an overly eggy taste. Because of this, I prefer to use coconut flour in conjunction with other paleo-friendly flours instead of using it on its own.
Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called “leaky gut and the autoimmune response”. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. And please watch this TED talk by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD as she describes how she reversed her Multiple Sclerosis with a paleo diet. If you have an autoimmune disease you might consider trying the autoimmune protocol of the paleo diet. If you do, please tell us about your experience.
Hi Sophie, I have found that the best almond flour for baking are the ones that have the skin removed (blanched) and are very finely ground. Some brands call it almond meal and some almond flour, so currently there’s no standard name. I have also found that not all brand work well. For example the Bobs Red Mill brand fails most of the time for baking. My personal favorite brands are by Honeyville and welbees. You may be able to order these from amazon.
I just came across this recipe as I am venturing into the Paleo world, as well as looking for recipes for my daughter who has really bad eczema and is off dairy, eggs (whites), wheat and soy. Do you think an egg replacer would work OK in this recipe? I’ll probably give it a try with the replacer I got from Whole Foods, but was wondering if anyone had already tried this recipe without eggs? I don’t know if ghee will work for her if she has to be dairy-free. Would coconut oil work the same? Thanks for any help/input! 🙂
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.
I cannot adequately share my enthusiasm for this bread. I’m not much of a bread maker so the tips were very helpful. I went through the effort to get the recommended ingredients and the cost was well worth it. I’ll be making several loaves. I’ve only recently switched to a keto diet and have been disappointed over and over again when I try new recipes as replacements for my favorites. THIS WAS THE FIRST SUCCESS!! Tastes great. I dont question that its bread, no tricking myself to like it. Thank you so much! I can’t wait to try more of your recipes!

I doubled the recipe and baked in a glass loaf pan (standard U.S. size) at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. The texture was great, but the taste was not so great…like baking soda (soapy/salty/bitter). I finally figured out that the baking soda didn’t have enough acid to react with, because I make my own raw applesauce in the Vitamix. Many prepared applesauce brands have citric acid added. I will try making this again tomorrow with the addition of a teaspoon or two of lemon juice. Hopefully that will be enough to react with the baking soda and remove the awful aftertaste. My husband didn’t care at all. He made two ham sandwiches with four slices of the bread, and then ate two more slices with jam. Half the loaf is gone already!
As a follow up to my post a few days ago about the ammonia smell after I slice the bread…..someone mentioned it could be the flax. So I baked a loaf and substituted chia for the flax, and still got the ammonia smell. I am wondering if there is some kind of chemical reaction taking place? And if so, I would assume this is not safe to eat? Is it the baking soda? Or apple cider vinegar? I don’t want to keep using up all my almond flour (I use Trader Joe’s), so if someone has any insight I would love to hear. Thanks

Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡

i loved this recipe! my bread did not rise like yours did although i used the recommended pan size. maybe because i used bob’s red mill meal/flour and my eggs were straight out of the fridge. those were the only two factors i could think of. anyways, the bread was delicious and i have longed for bread while following paleo plans. thanks, and i will continue to search for the flour that you recommend and allow my eggs to warm up a bit prior to my next loaf. i will let you know how that worked out.
There may be affiliate links in this post! By clicking on them, or purchasing recommended items I may receive a small compensation, at no cost to you! However, I only recommend products I absolutely love and use in my own home! Thank you for supporting Lexi's Clean Kitchen when you shop! See my privacy policy for more information about this, the information we save, and more! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QstRIqzr1eM
Love this bread!! I subbed ground salba seeds (chia) for the flax meal and it turned out great. (1/4 cup of salba seeds made 1/2 cup of salba meal) Also subbed using date sugar and coconut crystals for the honey and that worked fine. I did this to reduce glycemic impact/carbs by half. (I thought about leaving it out, but was afraid it was in there to counter the vinegar taste)
Anna, I haven’t tried making this bread without the vinegar, so I don’t know for sure how the recipe would fare without it. Vinegar here is used not only for the right flavor, but also to react with the leavening agent and create the proper rise for the bread. If you take out the vinegar, you’ll need to replace it with another acid. Can you tolerate lemon juice? If so, I’d try this recipe using 2 to 3 teaspoons of fresh lemon juice in place of the vinegar. Let me know how it goes if you give it a try! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VExW4SNt3Ko
I followed this recipe meticulously…but this “bread” is nothing like sandwich bread. Extremely dense and super fatty (greasy) and my son can’t pick it up without it falling apart for a school lunch (Exactly what I wanted it for). I used the coconut cream instead of yogurt and homemade almond flour which was super fine from a quick final mix in the Vitamix. I’ll use it up with Jelly but I couldn’t imagine adding more fat to it like butter or almond butter…it already qualifies as a paper weight LOL.
Weigh your ingredients. This will forever be a staple recommendation for any sort of gluten free baking here at gnom-gnom. As aside from leading to less dirty dishes, it will ensure consistent results time and time again. Remember that gluten free (and particularly keto) baking is notoriously finicky, and measuring by cups is anything but accurate. And if you don’t own a baking scale, measure with cups by dropping the ingredients onto them rather than scooping them out (which often leads to overpacking).
Liza, I haven’t tried this recipe using cashew flour, but if you’ve had success using a 1:1 substitution for almond flour making other bread-type recipes, I think it could work! I also haven’t tried this recipe using coconut milk, but other readers have and said it works well. Yes, please let us know how it goes if you try it with these substitutions!
Hi Elana, first let me say this bread is DELICIOUS! It turned out sweet, very moist, and just wonderful. HOWEVER, I am new to gluten free baking and despite the deliciousness of the bread, I ended up with a very faint ammonia-ish smell/after-taste and for the life of me I cannot figure out why. The only difference in the way I made my bread from your recipe is that I used whole, raw almond meal and whole, raw flaxseed meal, because that is what I had on hand. Oh and i used pure maple syrup instead of honey.

Love this bread!! I subbed ground salba seeds (chia) for the flax meal and it turned out great. (1/4 cup of salba seeds made 1/2 cup of salba meal) Also subbed using date sugar and coconut crystals for the honey and that worked fine. I did this to reduce glycemic impact/carbs by half. (I thought about leaving it out, but was afraid it was in there to counter the vinegar taste)
Paleonutrition by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
Elana – I would love it if you would share more of your cooking notes with your readers. I think it would really help those of us who need or want to experiment with ingredients and/or quantities. For instance, I made this bread and find it too “eggy” so I might try it again with one fewer egg. If I knew more about your process it could help mine. Thanks for all of your hard work! I get frustrated with one bad cooking experiment — you do it for a living!
Just made this exactly as listed with one sub of chia seed meal (made in dry Vitamix container) for the flaxseed meal, baked extra 5 minutes. Need to jiggle it out with a flat pancake flipper as though I did oil the pan, I did not use parchment as recommended. The loaf rose well in my 8.5 x 4.5 metal loaf pan. Hope everyone here likes it! I will report back. I plan to freeze some slices too.
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKF5zGzOkyo
I wanted to say thank you for the recipe. I made it today with my Vitamix. I used whole raw almonds and whole flax seed that I ground up in the Vitamix in batches rather than almond flour and flaxseed meal. I substituted two single serving packages of stevia for the honey and mixed everything in the Vitamix. My bread turned out great and tastes wonderful. The almond skins and stevia changed the color a little from the picture on the web site but my loaf still looks good (lighter crust and darker interior). (I used 1.5 cups of whole almonds, 2 tablespoons coconut flour, ¼ cup of whole flaxseeds, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1.5 teaspoons baking soda, 5 large eggs, ¼ cup coconut oil, 2 packets of stevia, and 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in the Magic Loaf Pan.) Thanks again.
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IsZmHSKqSU
×