Nice and firm. Baked it on the recommended temp, added 6 or 7 minutes. Pressed the middle and it was great. I let it cool. What was nice about it was obviously it’s low carb bread…hurray for that, but it cut well. Got 18 slices easily about 1/2 inch thick without breakage. Most importantly, it wasn’t greasy, or almond tasting overload, just delicious.

Hi there. The bottom right features a bread that almost looks like it is made of poppy seeds. It’s a different color than expected. Maybe chia…So I was curious which recipe it could be. I may have missed it, but I don’t see the pictures captioned with their corresponding recipes and I looked at all the recipes and I don’t see that particular picture on the linked pages. Now I have to know which one that could be! Please let me know ; )
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrcSUhdBgtc
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfDrmTzbLSM
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrcSUhdBgtc
For instance, the fat allowance of the diet may be problematic. “My biggest hang-up with the paleo diet is all of the saturated fats it promotes with all of the meats,” explains Holley, noting that you could look for a locally sourced meat, whose origin and method of raising you're aware of, as a healthier option. Saturated fat from meat has been linked with an increased risk of early death. (9) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4RrEsZEv3I

We did the same thing with sunflower sead butter in paleo bread the other day. We ran out of cashew butter (as the recipe called for) and filled in the final put with sunflower seed butter. Top half of the bread turned bright green! Some in the house wouldn’t eat it, but I loved it! And it was pretty cool when we looked up why it happened. Excited to try this recipe, thanks for sharing! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnLc95VpW5Q

Almost equal numbers of advocates and critics seem to have gathered at the Paleo diet dinner table and both tribes have a few particularly vociferous members. Critiques of the Paleo diet range from the mild—Eh, it's certainly not the worst way to eat—to the acerbic: It is nonsensical and sometimes dangerously restrictive. Most recently, in her book Paleofantasy, evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk of the University of California, Riverside, debunks what she identifies as myths central to the Paleo diet and the larger Paleo lifestyle movement.
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ
After making this wonderful bread half a dozen times (that’s in 10 days!) I decided to experiment. To this recipe I added a handful of each: drained and dried Calamata olives, fresh rosemary, raw pecans. I doubled the salt, at least, and sprinkled a few shakes of garlic powder into the batter. The new bread is just delicious. I just finished a piece with a smear of chèvre on it whine still warm.
Error msg again, sorry if this is redundant….lilely to not be as flowely, need to care for mom…………but I owe you great thanks…….keep you efforts us………I care for my 87 yr old mum……I keep her bs stable, I keep her contented………she loves your recipes….I am working to protect my husband who has numbers I do not like………I keep cooking to take care of everyoone……thankyou for taking the time to poste……I know my mum will have time defined by God……plan to kleep my spouse by my side so long as God can tolerate his absence………..ok, I am somewhat different…….but, this is about you, not me, so, thankyou for your efforts………………..sleep well………..luckylin
I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEgD1Qstko
I’ve found egg whites don’t do much here…. the foil tent is to prevent the bread from over browning on top once it begins to brown. Keep in mind that oven times are used as guidelines in baking, as ovens vary a lot (probably the trickiest part when you’re learning how to bake is to know when cakes and breads are done and tbh it just takes a little practice). Try pushing the baking time 7-10 minutes more next time and see how it turns out. xo!
I am studying nutrition and, like you, understand that many foods labeled as paleo weren’t actually consumed by our paleolithic ancestors thousands of years ago. I guarantee elana knows that as well. Labeling a recipe paleo is an easy way to categorize posts so those eating a paleo, or grain and dairy free whole foods diet, know it’s for them. Hope that clears up some of your frustration and or misunderstanding about paleo recipes. enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0XBm3SqTPE

While there is wide variability in the way the paleo diet is interpreted,[6] the diet typically includes vegetables, fruits, nuts, roots, and meat and typically excludes foods such as dairy products, grains, sugar, legumes, processed oils, salt, alcohol or coffee.[1][additional citation(s) needed] The diet is based on avoiding not just processed foods, but rather the foods that humans began eating after the Neolithic Revolution when humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to settled agriculture.[3] The ideas behind the diet can be traced to Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 and were popularized in the best-selling books of Loren Cordain.[8]
Made it last night and my husband & I ate the whole loaf! I used olive oil instead of palm oil, and I used arrowroot instead of tapioca flour. Also, I baked for 22min in a mini-loaf pan and let it cool for 15-20min before slicing. I got 8 small slices and they were delicious! Very fluffy and raised nicely during baking. The texture was extremely fluffy and just like any sandwich roll as you’d expect. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx6fTrGb6hA
Speaking from experience, you won’t be able to taste even the slightest coconut flavor in the bread, especially with just a small amount! Coconut flour has very unique properties compared to other flours (much more absorbent) and can’t be easily substituted. With how many tries it can take to get paleo baked goods to to have the right taste/texture, I recommend following Michelle’s recipe as written! 🙂
The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans continue to recognize the nutritional benefits of whole grains and recommend individuals make sure one-half of the grains they consume daily are whole grains. A 2016 meta-analysis of 45 cohort studies, published in The BMJ, looked at the relationship between whole grain consumption and the risk of various diseases including CVD and cancer.5 Researchers concluded that intake of whole grains is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, CVD, cancers, respiratory and infectious diseases, and diabetes. Furthermore, a 2017 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that when subjects consumed whole grains vs refined grains, inflammation was reduced.6

Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat—the paleo diet is all about eating foods straight from the Earth just as our ancestors did. Those ancestors didn't have livestock or crops to call their own, so Cordain advises to go with grass-fed and organic varieties whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn't exist back then. Research from Emory University suggests that Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wc5zUK2MKNY


I made this as written using the pan that Elana linked to and was a little disappointed with the height. A friend of mine said she makes the gluten free bread with a 4″x4″ pyrex pan because it gets taller and better for sandwiches, so i tried the Paleo bread again using her idea. It got taller, but the top looks like a volcano erupted. I’m not quite sure how to get a smoother top or what i did wrong for this to happen.

Happy weekend, and round up Sunday! I’m writing you from Colorado where we just had our first-ever, in-person Healthy Glow Co. retreat. I got to spend the weekend with the HGC team and 14 amazing members that make our collective possible. Feeling inspired, refreshed, and SO excited about the community we’ve built. I’ll be sure to share more details of our trip soon, but first let’s talk about these incredible paleo dessert recipes that I rounded up for you guys!

Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwVwQiqe4eM
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.

This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5XTj6D8zfQ
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h8FavH-Jx4
Grains and legumes (or pulses) are other groups that are frowned upon in the diet. "The right grains in the right amount can actually curtail inflammation," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN, creator of the blog Better Than Dieting and author of Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You From Label To Table. In addition, fiber-rich legumes, including beans, lentils, and peas, have been consistently linked with reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. "Fiber-rich carbs can supply energy, fiber, a host of vitamins and minerals, and a soothing satisfaction that could keep us from eating less nutritionally dense choices," Taub-Dix says. With the rise in popularity of ancient grains such as amaranth, millet, oats, and teff, and pulses, such as chickpeas and lentils, there's much opportunity to access versatile, naturally delicious whole grains and legumes that our ancestors ate. "Carbohydrates have a bad reputation, justified by the company they often keep, such as rich sauces and butter, and the forms in which they may be served (eg, donuts and pastries)," Taub-Dix says, "but the right carbs can save us from degenerative diseases."
It took me a few days to finally getting around to making these but I did because of your sloppy joe recipe you just posted. They are awesome!!! Next time I will make a double batch of buns! I used a muffin top pan for the buns and they came out perfect for tops and bottoms so I didn’t even have to split them. They bakes up really smooth and held together perfectly for wet sloppy joes! Thanks so much for developing and sharing your recipes. I am definitely becoming one of your biggest followers! Everything you make “works”! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQoCFZzal_s
I have just found your website and it is fantastic! Sitting at my computer my mouth is watering. I’m very new to the Gluten-free scene and am seriously considering Paleo as well so your website is a godsend. One question though, you mentioned how to measure the flour for your recipes and gave a weight in grams (thank you) but I have tried American recipes before and I think our tablespoon measure might be different also. How many millilitres is there in one of your tablespoon’s?
We’re in a position to understand more of the benefits of the Paleo diet now that we have a basic understanding of which food sources are emphasized. One major benefit of the Paleo diet is an increased consumption of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and plant phytochemicals. Whole grains are not a good substitute for grass-produced or free-ranging meats, fruits, and veggies, as they contain no vitamin C, vitamin A, or vitamin B12. Many of the minerals and some of the B vitamins whole grains do contain are not absorbed efficiently by the body. The Paleo diet cuts out whole grains and replaces them with unprocessed, fresh foods.
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.

Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwVwQiqe4eM
*I researched on yeast substitue sites that the apple cider vinegar (you or lemon juice if you prefer )and baking soda ratios MUST be a proportional 1:1 . (Ex: 1 tablespoon of each). Also when you add all the dough ingredients together, omit Applecider vinegar and baking soda untill your ready to pop dough in pan into the oven. (Whisking the vinegar and baking soda together also produces the same desired effect as yeast in a regular bread recipe ..thus the addition quickly and at the end)

Gabbi Berkow, MA, RD, CDN, CPT, is a Paleo advocate. She maintains the whole, unprocessed foods the diet recommends are low in calories, are high in nutrients, provide the fuel the body needs, and are the kinds of foods humans have evolved to easily digest. However, she doesn't agree with the blanket recommendations that everyone needs to eliminate dairy, grains (in particular, those containing gluten), and legumes, unless they have a medical condition that warrants it (eg, celiac disease or dairy allergy). In addition, Berkow says, "Dairy in particular is a good source of protein, calcium, and vitamin D, so cutting out dairy can make it harder to get enough of these nutrients."
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5PEhRsdGIU
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
I added chia seeds to give the bread a bit of a healthy crunch, but also for the many nutritional benefits of these little wonders.  This a great low carb bread full of all my favourite low carb flours and so easy to make too.   You could add other flavours to this with herbs and spices and not be disappointed.  My next plan with this is to probably add some seeds to it.    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JMPLMKoDMA
Paleo breads and muffins don’t rise like grain-based recipes do, and it’s that dense quality that makes them rich and indulgent enough to call dessert. The mashed bananas in this recipe provide the moisture needed to hold the delicate almond flour together. Those bananas are also a good course of potassium, which is important for building and maintaining muscle, as well as managing blood pressure. 

For all the recipes claiming to be the best paleo or Keto bread, I think yours is! I have found your recipe very helpful in satisfying keto cravings for bread. I am a personal chef and now a hero to my low-carb clients. I’d like to share this recipe in a cooking Keto article for our United States Personal Chef Association member magazine. Would you mind? It would of course be attributed to you/your site!
Hi Jodi, I haven’t tried that, but don’t think it would work well for this recipe. First, yeast needs sugar (for it to consume – it’s not typically in the end result), so you’d need to add that. But also, just with how we are making the bread fluffy with beaten egg whites, I don’t think yeast would work. If you want to try adding yeast to a low carb bread, I would do it with this low carb bread recipe instead.
• Maintain a team effort. Assist clients in making the healthful, positive aspects of their chosen diet part of a sustained lifestyle change. Teach clients to modify recipes or food choices appropriately to achieve their desired goals. This may include supporting the addition of small amounts of whole grains, legumes, and dairy to maintain nutritional adequacy.
I pinned your first roll recipe, but when I tried to go back to it – had disappeared. So because I make it often, repinned it. I noticed this time palm oil had been removed. I always used coconut oil instead. Anyway – just wondered why and if there is a difference in texture? I went ahead and added coconut oil because I’ve been so happy with the way I’ve been making them. (They slide out of pan which I like, with oil) One of my favorite and go to recipes – the only bread I eat. Thanks.
Food in Antiquity: A Survey of the Diet of Early Peoples (Expanded Edition) by Don R. Brothwell and Patricia Brothwell is a survey of what is known archaeologically about food and drink in pre-modern times. The chapter on insects includes their food value. In beverages it covers what happens to a neglected jar of fruit juice. Under cannibalism it shows evidence of this being done in paleo times, thought most of the work focuses on the classical and near-eastern civilizations, but occasional mention is made of the mesoamerican cultures as well. There is taxonomic and anatomical information.
Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qMoIguD8qs

I just wanted to say that I made this bread and it came out fantastic! I’m very pleased with it. It held together nicely and had a good taste. I felt it was also a great base for maybe some nut additions or raisin bread for a sweet twist. I’m definitely going to be playing around with this recipe. It was so EASY to put together too! Just perfect for a busy family trying to stay healthy and feel good. Thanks so much Elana!


I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgtM8mvAsY

The trouble with that view, however, is that what they’re eating is probably nothing like the diet of hunter-gatherers, says Michael Pollan, author of a number of best-selling books on food and agriculture, including Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. “I don’t think we really understand…well the proportions in the ancient diet,” argues Pollan on the latest episode of the Inquiring Minds podcast (stream below). “Most people who tell you with great confidence that this is what our ancestors ate—I think they’re kind of blowing smoke.”
When I tried this yesterday, it didn’t bake all the way, specifically most of the center was still raw. So after eating what was edible and tossing the rest (how do you do that btw, I always feel so bad throwing away the unfavorable outcomes…) I tweaked it as follows, went back today and now it’s great! I substituted 1 tsp baking powder and 1/2 tsp baking soda for the baking soda and baked it in the preheated oven at 325° for about 55 min. Thanks Elana for your hard work! Keep it up, it’s highly appreciated!
Hi, I just made this bread for the first time & my fiancé & I absolutely LOVE it! I did not use the flour you recommended my first time around as I am knew to “gluten free” & just picked a bag of almond flower off the shelf without realizing the specifics but I still loved it & will try the blanched almond flower next time around! I have been a bread lover my whole life so trying to implement the Paleo, Gluten free life style is a bit challenging for me! I must say you “saved” the day today! I do want to say that the bread came out closer to a more corn bread type then a traditional sandwich bread consistency. Do you have any tips I can use to make it as close to a traditional white bread for sandwiches? I would love to hear from you as I am a complete novace at this lol…thanks again! I’m so glad I found your sight so early in the game for me 🙂
I haven’t tested this recipe without tapioca starch, but in the Notes section above I list a few of the substitutions I’ve tested and had success with. Tapioca starch helps to add rise and bounce to this loaf, making it somewhat “fluffy” and closer to the texture of regular bread. If you decide to experiment with this recipe using something other than tapioca starch, please let me know what works!

Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread.

I made its latest version today and absolutely I love it. I like that it does not taste like almond or coconut it tastes like a bread. A verg good bread that it’s not harmful at least with recent knowledge of us because before it I thought whole meal bread is really good for us and I was very proud to my healthy breakfast oats, raw honey and seeds but then they figured out that oats are not harmless I am wondering what is the next thing that will be deleted from my diet:((

Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.
I just made the bread above and sadly for me LOLOl it was only 2′ high I am wondering if that is because i mixed it in my Mixmaster not a food processor it tastes yummy but I’m not sure why it didn’t rise higher. the batter was very thick when I put it in the loaf tin Oh well I wil have to try it again LOLOl we will eat it fast as it tastes soooo good
The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25]
re almond flour & coconut oil, any health food store staff would be super helpful in pointing you to the right ones, especially when you tell them you’ll baking. he showed me unbleached almond flour and coconut flour (Bob’s Red Mill is all over NYC, at least, and you can get it online http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-Organic-16-Ounce/dp/B000KENKZ8/ref=sr_1_4?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1383057846&sr=1-4&keywords=bob%27s+red+mill+coconut their products are consistently great, IMHO)
I’ve tried this recipe 3 or 4 times and had the same barely rising results. I’ve tried several ways. Most recently proofing in the instant pot where it’s a controlled warm environment. Yeast activates. All ingredients were room temperature. I don’t really feel that my yeast/egg/butter/acv mixture gets very “light and frothy” despite mixing for several minutes but other than that everything should be spot on. But if it’s the yeast that is responsible for rising then I’m not sure how that would be connected. I really wish I could see a detailed video on how this is done instead of a semi related one for a different bread. It’s too complicated a process it seems….I literally need step by step video apparently.
Woot woot for AB bars!!! Yep I still say it. If we if we keep saying it long enough it will probably become cool again…just like floral curtains???? I appreciate how you give all the nut butters their proper chance to be showcased, no playing mess-prone goop favorites. But since today is about AB I have to admit I had an almond butter phase too actually. It was more about excessive almond butter eating though, not making???? (Have you ever tried Justin’s vanilla AB? Probs not since you make your own. But I’m pretty sure there is crack (or frosting) in there, it’s too good.) I tried making my own once, overheated the food processor, never tried again. And honestly just the thought of that goopy greasy cleanup is enough to make me run to the store…I admire your lack of baking laziness???? Buying it also means one less step between me and me shoving THESE in my face, and I am all for speeding up that!! A batch of these and the PB ones so I can do a side-by-side please! And if ever you do go back to cray 500 cookies a day BB, I call at least 50 of them, kay? Love ya❤️❤️
Andrew. it probably was almond flour and they called it powder to let people know it was finely ground. I think next time be sure to preheat your oven and if you can get an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it. Also, use arrowroot instead of tapioca if you can find it. You could blend the wet ingredients in a blender or beat the eggs well. You can also beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form and then gently fold that into the batter to give your bread more lift. Keep me posted please 🙂
I’ve put together a roundup of 45 (that’s a lot!) recipes for Paleo-friendly / Paleo desserts. These will definitely come in handy for special occasions, birthdays, holidays, or for Wednesday night emergencies. I’m sorry Whole30 hasn’t completely changed my way of thinking yet… Let’s be real. I’m just being a realist and planning ahead, I know there will be days with chocolate in the forecast.

Coconut flour is a great alternative when you need to avoid almond flour because of a nut allergy, or for any other reason. With a couple easy tips, coconut flour can also yield delicious gluten free baked goods. Coconut flour is very high in fiber and subsequently absorbs a lot of liquid, so as a general rule, it’s recommended to use the coconut flour and liquid at the same ratio. Coconut flour can also result in very dense and/or dry and crumbly baked goods, so it’s important not to use too much coconut flour, and to use other ingredients to lighten the texture. This is why a lot of recipes that call for coconut flour also call for a lot of eggs. However, then the issue is that the baked goods have an overly eggy taste. Because of this, I prefer to use coconut flour in conjunction with other paleo-friendly flours instead of using it on its own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEWaInxB4aI
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