I didn’t read through all 400+ comments, so I don’t know if this has been discussed, but this recipe calls for a really huge amount of baking soda and doesn’t have the huge amount of acidic ingredients needed to balance it. I tried it anyway as written and sure enough, the resulting product smells and tastes like un-neutralized baking soda. Normally a recipe like this would use baking powder, so I tried again, using 1.5 tsp of baking powder instead of the baking soda. I eliminated the vinegar, since its main role would be to neutralize (some of) the baking soda.
My husband is a new diabetic and was put on the Paleo Diet. I have tried multiple grain free breads and have been disappointed with each and every one of them!! I don’t care for their taste and they are too small to use for a sandwich. I just baked your recipe and it has a nice crust, is MOIST on the inside, it ROSE and it tastes wonderful!! I am so very pleased and appreciative!! My search for bread is now over. Thank you so much for this ((( <3 )))
This has been happening to me too! I make it exactly how the recipe is written. I tried baking it longer and its still hollow in the middle and mushy. It used to come out perfect for me but the last 4 times it has been this way. I just recently moved and made the first loaf in the new oven and same thing!! So frustrating. Maybe cover it with foil and cook it even longer than 35 min? What rack should it be on? Please help!! I can’t live without my paleo bread!!

Ugh! It’s been an hour and it doesn’t look like my bread has hardly risen at all. I haven’t made any substitutions, my yeast was good, etc. I currently live in Italy, so it’s plenty warm here today. I’ve now warmed my oven up a bit, turned it off, and have the dough in there to see if I can get any kind of rise out of it before trying to cook. Fingers crossed!
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
Hi Brenda, There are various reasons but the most common one is that coconut flour is extremely absorbent and needs a lot of eggs to offset how much moisture it absorbs. If you used a liquid like milk or water, it would fall apart. That being said, this recipe is not dry or dense. Did you try making it? Whipping the egg whites creates the exact opposite effect and the bread turns out light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try!
I love this recipe and I have one slight problem, during baking the top cracks on either one or both sides and puffs up, which crates a separation from the rest of the loaf. Still tastes great though. I’m wondering if it’s from either not mixing enough or mixing too much in the food processor or if there is something else I’m doing wrong? Not sure how I can send you a picture of todays load?!
Regardless of people pleasing, this nut and seed paleo bread quickly became a staple in our house and a new FAVORITE!  I made a few loaves batch and froze one loaf.  Just one loaf of this paleo bread made about a week worth of sandwiches plus breakfast toast. Heck ya!  If you follow me on snapchat, you will know this. I made the kiwi (aka my husband) all his sandwiches in one week so he wouldn’t forget to eat! Who does that?

I pinned your first roll recipe, but when I tried to go back to it – had disappeared. So because I make it often, repinned it. I noticed this time palm oil had been removed. I always used coconut oil instead. Anyway – just wondered why and if there is a difference in texture? I went ahead and added coconut oil because I’ve been so happy with the way I’ve been making them. (They slide out of pan which I like, with oil) One of my favorite and go to recipes – the only bread I eat. Thanks.
Fattening cattle with corn changes the lipid balance and is clearly not the natural diet for a grass eating cow. In Simple change in cattle diets could cut E. coli infection researchers have found that when cattle were fed hay or grass for just five days before slaughter, much less E. Coli cells were present in the animal's feces and virtually all surviving E. coli bacteria were not acid-resistant and were killed by human stomach acid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9eyUSERjrs
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube.
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
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