Gabbi Berkow, MA, RD, CDN, CPT, is a Paleo advocate. She maintains the whole, unprocessed foods the diet recommends are low in calories, are high in nutrients, provide the fuel the body needs, and are the kinds of foods humans have evolved to easily digest. However, she doesn't agree with the blanket recommendations that everyone needs to eliminate dairy, grains (in particular, those containing gluten), and legumes, unless they have a medical condition that warrants it (eg, celiac disease or dairy allergy). In addition, Berkow says, "Dairy in particular is a good source of protein, calcium, and vitamin D, so cutting out dairy can make it harder to get enough of these nutrients."
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today.
However, I’ve made the Paleo bread twice and the same thing happened both times. The inside of the bread developed a huge hole and was not cooked. I’ve made the Paleo Pumpkin bread five times and had no problems, which makes me ask: since the Pumpkin bread bakes for 45 minutes, could there be a typo in this recipe and perhaps the bread should bake longer than 30 minutes?
Hi Eva, That’s awesome that you are helping your son this way. I haven’t tried this with other tools, but you could probably use either the blender or the food processor. The key is to pulse in step 5, not just constantly blend, so that the whites don’t fully break down. Other than that, it should be pretty similar. As for the yolks, if you don’t want to make creme brulee, I usually just put a couple extras into an omelet (or breakfast casserole, or any other dish requiring cooked eggs) mixed with whole eggs.

I’m new to the whole GF thing – I don’t have a physical need/condition for eating grain free, but the whole concept of this healthy way of eating intrigues me, so I’m just “testing the waters.” It is very generous that Elana shares her recipes for free so that I can give it a try before jumping in with both feet – and when/if I do, I’ll be buying her recipe books. Great blog.


Hahaha. That’s why we’re besties. We staunchly refuse to follow the times. ???? Now what’s this all about floral curtains? Do you have a set picked out for me? Lolol. I’ve never tried Justin’s vanilla AB. But now I’m super intrigued! Yes on the overheating–AB takes a lot longer than you would think. I will label at least 100 of these cookies for you. 😉 Love ya more! <3 <3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhthf8B-xk
So I’m pretty familiar with the science of baking, and I also understand there’s significant differences when omitting gluten. The recipe calls for sour cream, and vinegar, both acids that work best as leaveners when combined with baking soda, then baking powder (1 part soda 2 parts cream of tartar (another acid) and straight cream of tartar. So it calls for acid in four separate forms. In standard baking that calls for baking powder you add soda when adding additional acid such as sour cream, buttermilk etc… when a small amount of acid is added to bread dough it increases the yeasts ability to give lift by creating gluten, but to much kills the yeast entirely. So in the absence of gluten, isn’t the acid used here excessive? I wonder if a reduction would cause greater rise? What is the purpose of the baking powder combined with the yeast? Can you please explain the science behind this? P.S. the flavor of this was excellent but it didn’t rise as expected despite an excellent yeast test, fresh powder, and 1 hour in the proof box.
Hello Elana: I have been a Paleo girl for about 8 months and am thoroughly enjoying the hunting and gathering! Today I was cooking turkey and wanted to adapt my stuffing recipe and found your Paleo bread recipe. Thanks so much. It works well with my other ingredients, mushrooms, onion, parsnips, celery, jalapeño and sausages, spicey pepper and summer savory and of course coconut oil. Can’t wait till dinner time.

For those who were considering ordering Paleo bread from the Julian Bakery online, just a word of caution: beware! The bad reviews are really true, and I’m not one who usually does any online reviews. I have ordered both the almond and the coconut breads for awhile. I am not sure what to make of the taste of them, but the almond is definitely a no-go for me. The coconut was palatable, if you chug down some liquid with it and pretend you’re not about to choke! It’s gagging, tasteless, and soggy-at-times bread, but I guess I was desperate for a slice, truly desperate to think it was edible.
mine didn’t rise up as much as the one in the picture either…also it stuck to the bottom of pan in spite of cooking spray…I guess I should have sprayed liberally! waiting for it to cool to cut, though the pieces that were stuck in the pan tasted good…if you use coconut cream instead of the greek yogurt, do you need to refrigerate it to make it thick or does it work in liquid state from the can?

Evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk writes that the idea that our genetic makeup today matches that of our ancestors is misconceived, and that in debate Cordain was "taken aback" when told that 10,000 years was "plenty of time" for an evolutionary change in human digestive abilities to have taken place.[4]:114 On this basis Zuk dismisses Cordain's claim that the paleo diet is "the one and only diet that fits our genetic makeup".[4]
Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.

Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Jh5J8BCUks
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.
Hi Danielle, The bread will not rise without the baking powder, but you could try it if you don’t mind that. Some people make homemade baking powder with baking soda, cream of tartar, and arrowroot powder. But, arrowroot is still a very small amount of starch. Divided among the slices, it’s actually fewer carbs than some of the other ingredients (e.g. almond flour has a small amount of carbs also).
Julian Bakery made Paleo Bread™ to fulfill the craving for bread while you are living a Paleo lifestyle free from processed foods. Paleo Bread utilizes the highest quality ingredients.  This bread provides the protein and fiber your body needs to satisfy hunger while helping your body to perform at its peak.  We love The Paleo Bread and hope you do too!
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
July 2016 I weighed 225 lbs. and was desperate for a way of eating that I could lose weight with but not starve doing so. This book contained the answers I'd been seeking for years and, in my opinion, is the perfect starter book to understanding the Paleo eating plan. By July 2017 I dropped 65 lbs., felt absolutely great, and became a strong proponent of eating this way for a lifetime. Loren Cordain keeps it simple and straight-forward, explaining the diet in an uncomplicated manner.
Many of you asked if you could make them with almond butter. So here we are, settling it once and for all. Why, yes, you can make them with almond butter. Woot woot!! Btw, please tell me that people still say “woot woot.” As usual, I’m like 1 full decade late to the slang game. Shall I remind you of my use of “cray?” I’ve totally got to start calling things “lit” too before that goes out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoepvUQlRzo
The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhL5DCizj5c
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