Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnTEnvdLl7E
This is the second incarnation of Paleo Bread attempted by the TGIPaleo gang, and they’ve made a few adjustments and seem to have gotten the hang of this. This version keeps the coconut flour but does away with the flax and the arrowroot flour. Instead they’re using egg whites and applesauce to get the job done, and they seem pretty pleased with themselves, as we have yet to locate a third version. Try both and see which one you like best, because they really are different styles of the same sort of bread.
Hi, I’ve made this recipe twice and LOVE the taste. However, both times the bread would rise so high in the oven, but as soon as I take it out to cool it deflated and middle sink down. What could’ve gone wrong? Over mixing? I did switch coconut flour to all almond flour instead. Could that be a problem? Please help as I’m anxious to make another batch. Thank you.
With carbohydrates and protein intake already accounted for, fat intake comprises the rest of the Paleo diet. We’ve been taught that fat is something to be avoided at all costs, but it’s actually not the total amount of fat in your diet that raises your blood cholesterol levels and increases your risk for heart disease, cancer, and Type 2 diabetes; rather, it’s the type of fat that should concern you. The Paleo diet calls for moderate to higher fat intake dominated by monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats with a better balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fats.

In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.


My bread came out a teeny bit “eggy”…which wasn’t bad, I still enjoyed it. Maybe some egg yolk made it in the batter??? Anyway, the slight egginess made me think of French toast. So with the last few pieces, that’s what I made. I mixed an egg, heavy cream, and a little vanilla to coat the bread…used browned butter to sub for syrup…then topped off with Swerve confectioners sugar. It was delicious!

Another possibility is that maybe your oven is not well calibrater (which is normal) and your bread needed to cook longer. I suggest next time you insert the stick in a few areas to ensure it’s done throughout. Also, it’s a good idea to purchase an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature is where you want it during baking. They cost less that $20, I got mine for less than $10.


When a client following the Paleo diet comes in for a visit to discuss weight loss or other health issues, it's important for dietitians to use the opportunity to build rapport and trust even if they're not 100% on board. "Paleo practitioners are dedicated and committed to their beliefs," Taub-Dix says, "so taking an approach that just presents the negatives could turn them off from listening to your words of wisdom. Try to present the rationale behind how the diet could be followed but perhaps enhanced."
Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!!
Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
The Raw Paleo Diet & Lifestyle site is a resource created by members of the Raw Paleolithic Diet community for people looking to improve their health by choosing a more historically natural approach to diet, fitness and lifestyle. They have two forums: Raw Paleo Forum. It has some activity. And Raw Paleo Diet, or RVAF Raw Veg and Animal Foods Group, a forum for followers of semi-RPD diets, (such as Aajonus Vonderplanitz's Primal Diet/Weston-Price Diet/Sally Fallon/Instincto) and followers of the NeanderThin/Paleo/Stefansson Diets, who, for health reasons, wish to pursue a more fully Raw, Paleolithic variation of those diets.
I made this as written using the pan that Elana linked to and was a little disappointed with the height. A friend of mine said she makes the gluten free bread with a 4″x4″ pyrex pan because it gets taller and better for sandwiches, so i tried the Paleo bread again using her idea. It got taller, but the top looks like a volcano erupted. I’m not quite sure how to get a smoother top or what i did wrong for this to happen.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
In light of Paleo's low ranking in US News & World Report, it stands to reason why most RDs don't advocate the diet—and for a variety of reasons. "The Paleo diet has a lot of good things going for it. It recommends excluding processed foods and refined sugars and emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and lean protein," says Heather Mangieri, MS, RDN, CSSD, LDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Fueling Young Athletes. However, Mangieri says, "Any diet that suggests eliminating an entire food group can set you up for nutritional deficiencies, boredom, and an overfocus on food." Because the diet eliminates all dairy, meeting calcium and vitamin D requirements can be difficult. Mangieri has experienced this issue firsthand in her private practice. "Even though Paleo proponents claim they can meet their calcium needs from nondairy foods, I have yet to find a client that eats that many greens and is that thought out in their eating. Supplementation becomes a must to meet the needs for these nutrients."
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
I just made the bread above and sadly for me LOLOl it was only 2′ high I am wondering if that is because i mixed it in my Mixmaster not a food processor it tastes yummy but I’m not sure why it didn’t rise higher. the batter was very thick when I put it in the loaf tin Oh well I wil have to try it again LOLOl we will eat it fast as it tastes soooo good https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_pUwYbFgpY
In general, the paleo diet involves eating nutrient-rich real foods, such as meat, fish, nuts, eggs, vegetables, and fruits. It’s best to choose grass-fed and pasture-raised meats, and organic produce whenever possible. The paleo lifestyle removes refined sugars, grains, legumes, dairy, and unhealthy fats and oils from your diet, as well as highly processed foods. (Read more about the paleo diet on HealthLine and EatingWell.)

my loaf is in the oven so here’s hoping it will be as good as it looks…. please amend the directions to include the addition of baking powder, chia seeds and salt. I’m assuming they come before the vinegar but the directions don’t say anything about adding them in. I didn’t notice until after the vinegar was added so I hope it still turns out. thanks Lisa
This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!!
I completely omitted the palm shortening and didn’t replace it with anything – I can’t tell that anything’s missing. I also doubled the recipe and put it all in one loaf pan like some others did and baked it for 30 minutes. Even the hubs, who is truly a bread addict, really likes this recipe! I think they’re kind of English Muffiny and I toast the slices for sandwiches. Gluten gives me eczema and I never thought I’d get a good sandwich bread again. Thank you! 🙂
I was curious about the pan and found a very interesting 1 out of 5 star review on Amazon. The customer who purchased and used the pan not only got a metallic taste in her(?) first loaf, but the bread was also tinged green. She had to throw the bread away. I do not know if it would get better with use and washings, but she gave a good enough argument for me to avoid this buying this particular pan.
As a follow up to my post a few days ago about the ammonia smell after I slice the bread…..someone mentioned it could be the flax. So I baked a loaf and substituted chia for the flax, and still got the ammonia smell. I am wondering if there is some kind of chemical reaction taking place? And if so, I would assume this is not safe to eat? Is it the baking soda? Or apple cider vinegar? I don’t want to keep using up all my almond flour (I use Trader Joe’s), so if someone has any insight I would love to hear. Thanks
thank you for prompt reply. I do hope it tastes better than other low carb bread I’ve made and thrown out because I dislike the taste and sometimes it was too wet. It looks great so will try and report back. I must find something I like as at the moment am tucking into “normal” bread and that’s not good for my wastline or my diabetes. Thanks for the inspiring recipes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKHpXiHj_KU
A special note on dairy: I made this bread with dairy (butter and greek plain yogurt) so technically some people would go against it being called Paleo. With the knowladge we now have today we should know that there are many benefits to consuming dairy made from organic grass fed animals. Butter is an extremely good source of fat and loaded with vitamin A, D and K, and Conjugated Linoleic Acid. Yogurt contains live and active bacteria that are beneficial and keep your digestive system clean and provide food for the friendly bacteria that reside there. On top of that, the live active probiotic bacteria in yogurt can rev up your immune system and reduce your risk of yeast infection, prevent allergy symptoms and naturally increase your metabolism. Not all yogurts are made the same though, so you need to look for these words on the label:  “contain active cultures”, “active yogurt cultures”, or “living yogurt cultures”.
The yeast in this low carb and keto bread ensures a wonderful texture and taste. Now, how much your bread will rise (and fall!) post-bake depends quite a bit on your altitude. But note that you still won’t get that gummy and wet texture here of most low carb breads. Plus, as mentioned, we’re baking at over 7,000 feet (Mexico City here!!), so if we can make this keto sandwich bread work so can you.
Today I accidentally used besan (chickpea or garbanzo flour) and again, it came out great. I had forgotten that the almond flour was in the fridge and not the cabinet. I was wondering what was going on when the dough was much more sticky, was slightly darker, and smelled differently. I realized my mistake, cooked it anyway, and now have an acceptable substitute for almond flour. I think I like the almond better, but will enjoy this loaf anyway.
4. Raw food is for the birds (too much of it, anyway). There’s paleo, and then there’s the raw diet. Folks who eat raw tout the health benefits of the approach, saying that they’re accessing the full, complete nutrients available because they’re not heating, and thus destroying, their dinner. But that’s simply wrong. We cook to get our hands on more nutrients, not fewer. According to Wrangham, the one thing absolutely all cultures have in common is that they cook their food. He points out that women who move towards 100 percent raw diets often stop ovulating, because even if in theory they’re tossing sufficient food into the blender to fulfill their caloric needs, they simply can’t absorb enough from the uncooked food.
Tried making these with sunflower seed butter in a bun pan! They do come out a bit green, but I like them better than the almond butter variety. I’m using sugar free/salt free sunflower seed butter (not SunButter) and it seems to be the most filling stuff on the planet. I can’t eat more than a teaspoon of it (unlike almond butter, which I must be very careful around!), and it makes these little bread rounds very filling, too! I pour 1/4 cup of batter into each well of a standard bun pan and I get 10 or 12 little bread rounds. They’re not as tall as muffin tops, and much shorter than a yeast roll. I pop them in the toaster and spread them with butter and homemade Paleo jam. Great for breakfast!
I love this recipe and I like to tweak things. I came up with a tweak to make banana bread. Since holiday baking is my weakness and I had an almost suicidal reaction to wheat (I really know I’m allergic now) I wanted some banana bread. I subbed 1 cup of almond flour to walnut flour, omitted the ACV, added sweetener to taste, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (sugar free) and 1 mashed banana. I LOVE banana so I also added a little banana flavoring. Baked up to a heavenly bread that I can eat without bloating and severe mood reactions!! I LOVE this site for recipes!! My next attempt will be either pumpkin bread or orange cranberry. Makes a great “I NEED SWEET” snack or breakfast as I’m zooming out the door.
This is really good. I only use 3 eggs,. I didn’t have any arrowroot powder, so I used cornstarch instead. I used lemon juice instead of ACV because ACV gives me migraines and I used coconut cream (don’t like yogurt). It tasted a bit like sweet bread, but it made an excellent sandwich. It didn’t rise like the picture. I’m sure it because of the substitutions I made. I always make sandwiches cutting the bread in half anyway so it didn’t matter that it didn’t rise as high as the picture shows. This will be my go to bread for now on. Oh yeah. I baked it for 45 minutes instead of 25. Ovens temperatures and climates varies for baking. I always baked paleo breads on 350 degrees for 45 minutes. It comes out perfect every time. Thank you so much for posted this recipe.
I accidentally forgot mine when my “timer” didn’t remind me. I remembered it and pulled it out after it had been in the oven an extra 13 minutes. It was almost perfect. I also just whisked vigorously as my processor is missing since the last move. I will definitely make it again, but I will likely play with it a bit as I am hoping to find a few versions to make regularly to replace my family’s usual bread. Even our most finicky eater is loving these recipes so far. Thank you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DwSUL-i8i0

As University of California-Davis food chemist Bruce German told Pollan in an interview, “You could not survive on wheat flour. But you can survive on bread.” Microbes start to digest the grains, breaking them down in ways that free up more of the healthful parts. If bread is compared to another method of cooking flour—basically making it into porridge—”bread is dramatically more nutritious,” says Pollan.
Combining higher protein intake and fresh vegetables leads to another major benefit: blood sugar stabilization. Between 35 and 45 percent of the average Paleo diet is comprised of non-starchy fresh fruits and vegetables that won’t spike blood sugar levels, making it an optimal diet for diabetes prevention. This is because nearly all of these foods have low glycemic indices that are slowly digested and absorbed by the body.

The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
A diet high in phytic acid, which can be found in whole grains (it's in the bran) and beans like soy, is very detrimental for mineral absorption. Phytic acid strongly binds to minerals like calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium to form insoluble salts, phytates, which precipitate from the body and are not absorbed. Staffan Lindeberg has written a summary on phytic acid.

The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites.
I must admit that when I read all the comments for this recipe I was so nervous to try it even though I’ve been hand-kneeding and baking my own breads without a recipe (an ancient family tradition) for over 20 years. Since I don’t have any background in gluten-free baking but recently changed to a low-carb lifestyle, I didn’t know what to expect. I noticed that a lot of people seemed to have issues with the proofing and resting of the bread dough. In order to eliminate the possibility of this happening, and since I know I understand yeast proofing really well, and knew that I won’t have an issue with dead yeast, I made sure that my kitchen temperature would be really warm so I placed a space heater on my kitchen counter facing the yeast and then later the dough as it rested. In the end, the bread turned out near perfect. The smell and taste was fabulous. The only thing I can say is that my bread pan is a 9X5 so next time I will make 1.5 the recipe. Otherwise, all I can say is this recipe is a winner!!!!
1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do.
Once your yeast is proofed, add in the egg, egg whites, lightly cooled melted butter (you don't want to scramble the eggs or kill the yeast!) and vinegar. Mix with an electric mixer for a couple minutes until light and frothy. Add the flour mixture in two batches, alternating with the sour cream, and mixing until thoroughly incorporated. You want to mix thoroughly and quickly to activate the xanthan gum, though the dough will become thick as the flours absorb the moisture. 

wow, I have tried to make a good gluten free bread for about a year and this tops all of the recipes I’ve tried. I have to agree with the comment that most gluten-free/grain-free breads are eggy … this one is not and it tastes great. I just enjoyed a piece with boursin tomato pesto. Thank you for the great recipe. I will be trying many more of your recipes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni9XJ90f-Bc
I made its latest version today and absolutely I love it. I like that it does not taste like almond or coconut it tastes like a bread. A verg good bread that it’s not harmful at least with recent knowledge of us because before it I thought whole meal bread is really good for us and I was very proud to my healthy breakfast oats, raw honey and seeds but then they figured out that oats are not harmless I am wondering what is the next thing that will be deleted from my diet:((
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck.
I made this bread the other day following the recipe to the T, and although it tasted delicious, I did have some problems with it. I used the same size pan and my bread came out to be about half as tall as whats pictured. Also, the first time I took it out of the oven it was still raw inside even after cooking for quite a long time, so I had to put it back in. This wouldnt be a problem, except I found that when it was finally all cooked through, It had such a thick crust on top that I couldn’t cut it without it crumbling all to pieces. Any suggestions on how to get it to rise more and how to prevent the ultra-thick crust from forming on top?
I’ve been on a Keto diet for 8 weeks now and haven’t eaten any bread. This recipe should come with a warning – extra willpower required! ‘Cool in the pan for 2 hours’. Are you kidding me? It smelled so delicious I had to have a slice still warm, with butter. It was delicious. Next time I’ll be good and follow the instructions. Can’t wait to try the others. Thank you Elana!
One of the foods that people tell us they miss most after going keto is bread. (And cookies or cakes, but you get the idea.) We get it, bread is undeniably comfort food. Growing up, it wasn’t unheard of to eat toast for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch, and maybe even a slice of buttered bread along with dinner. Not only is that ton of carbs, but it’s also a lot of empty calories when we could have been eating real-food alternatives, like this bread made from nutrient-dense ingredients!
I made this bread twice. The first time I followed your recipe exactly, but it came out dry and sort of tasteless. I think it’s because of my elevation and how dry the climate is here, so I added about a 1/4 c maple syrup the second time I made it and it’s perfect! I really like this recipe, and I hope others at high and dry climates don’t give up on it if they have the same problem.

Anna are you saying even though you omitted the almond butter and just made the bread with the rest of the ingredients it was exactly as if the almond butte was in the recipe. Was there any difference at all like holding together as well, or maybe it did not rise as much, etc. Can you please explain what was different and which was was better in taste and texture and rising, etc. Thanks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlKj2aWp0F4
The paleo diet is hot. Those who follow it are attempting, they say, to mimic our ancient ancestors—minus the animal-skin fashions and the total lack of technology, of course. The adherents eschew what they believe comes from modern agriculture (wheat, dairy, legumes, for instance) and rely instead on meals full of meat, nuts, and vegetables—foods they claim are closer to what hunter-gatherers ate.

Thanks for taking the time to post the Metric measures Pat. I’ve just made my first loaf, which is ok but I misread the ingredients and only put 1/2 tsp of baking powder in the mix ..duh! There’s another one baking right now with the correct amount in . Really looking forward to it. I’m going to slice it up and freeze it in portions so I can take out what I need and toast it. The only downside for me is the almond flour and coconut flour is very expensive in the uk.
Thank you so much! This was delicious, didn’t crumble and fall apart like most g.f. breads. I brought it to my Bible Study group, one gal is on the Paleo diet and I am gluten free, two gals can eat anything. They all loved it. It is so easy to make, again, thank you so much for posting. I’ve already shared the recipe with two of the gals in the group. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrjjJnfLxC0

How do you account for the differance in calories and fat in this bread recipe from the Healthy Low Carb & Gluten Free Bread that it is modeled after. The basic ingredients are the same with some additions here. This bread says it yields 10 serv. and has 156 cal and 12g fat. The other says 8 serv.and has 267 cal and 24g fat. This doesn’t make sense. I need to keep the fat down so I need to be sure this is lower fat.
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_gwVHWIsoA
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