The trouble with that view, however, is that what they’re eating is probably nothing like the diet of hunter-gatherers, says Michael Pollan, author of a number of best-selling books on food and agriculture, including Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. “I don’t think we really understand…well the proportions in the ancient diet,” argues Pollan on the latest episode of the Inquiring Minds podcast (stream below). “Most people who tell you with great confidence that this is what our ancestors ate—I think they’re kind of blowing smoke.”
I made this bread about a week ago and it turned out great. I used an 8″ x 4″ x 2-1/4″ disposable aluminum loaf pan that I got at the 99 cent store. The size pan was perfect and the loaf turned out great. I also used Extra Large Eggs, so I only used 4 of them instead of 5. I love the texture and it toasts up very nicely and I have used it as sandwich bread. Thanks for the great recipe.

I make my own ACV from apple scraps. It’s so easy….after peeling and coring apples for another recipe, you take the scraps, let them air dry for a bit, then put them in a jar with water, cover with coffee filter and rubberband, put in cabinet and let it sit. 3 days is minimum, and better is 5-6 weeks or longer. I have let it sit for months and have come out with a great product. My first batch, I did add a couple tablespoons of Braggs as a starter. This will create a “mother” you can use over and over again. It’s a continuous process…and you never run out of ACV!
“I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.”
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTSvNt_hZo
Liza, I haven’t tried this recipe using cashew flour, but if you’ve had success using a 1:1 substitution for almond flour making other bread-type recipes, I think it could work! I also haven’t tried this recipe using coconut milk, but other readers have and said it works well. Yes, please let us know how it goes if you try it with these substitutions!
Here is your chance to make pumpkin bagels that can help usher in fall, and also are great any time of the year. They are made with real pumpkin of course, as well as a host of additional ingredients to make them taste great without being bad for you in any way. Just be sure to follow the Paleo instructions, as this is a multi-purpose recipe but they’ve included the necessary substitutes to keep it Paleo. These taste great with grass-fed butter on them, and you can even try using a Paleo-friendly cream cheese if you feel up to it.
I made this bread last night and it turned out so delicious and moist! My 2 & 4 year old couldn’t get enough of it either which was so exciting to see. I want to start making this bread for my daughters school lunches but it’s a nut-free school. Could the almond flour be replaced by coconut flour? Or any other flour? If so, whould the measurements change of the ingredients? I am not a baker so I am a bit clueless.
Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1EwdriXhpc
Thanks so much for the link love, dear Elana! I’m so, so happy you are enjoying our bees’ honey! :-) I’ve been making a similar paleo bread of late, but mine doesn’t contain coconut flour or ACV. I’m intrigued with your variations, but more importantly I know it’s good as you have just posted this recipe and I’ve already seen folks reference it in their posts! Now that’s a stellar recommendation, my friend! ;-)
Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)
Trying to devise an ideal diet by studying contemporary hunter-gatherers is difficult because of the great disparities that exist; for example, the animal-derived calorie percentage ranges from 25% for the Gwi people of southern Africa to 99% for the Alaskan Nunamiut.[40] Descendants of populations with different diets have different genetic adaptations to those diets, such as the ability to digest sugars from starchy foods.[40] Modern hunter-gatherers tend to exercise considerably more than modern office workers, protecting them from heart disease and diabetes, though highly processed modern foods also contribute to diabetes when those populations move into cities.[40]

I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . .
The Paleo diet includes nutrient-dense whole fresh foods and encourages participants to steer away from highly processed foods containing added salt, sugar, and unhealthy fats. However, the omission of whole grains, dairy, and legumes could lead to suboptimal intake of important nutrients. The restrictive nature of the diet may also make it difficult for people to adhere to such a diet in the long run.  More high-quality studies including randomized controlled trials with follow-up of greater than one year that compare the Paleo diet with other weight-reducing diets are needed to show a direct health benefit of the Paleo diet. Strong recommendations for the Paleo diet for weight loss cannot be made at this time.

You’ll lose weight because any time you restrict entire food groups, your calorie intake tends to be lower, Sandon says. And whenever you burn more calories than you consume, you'll have weight loss, she says. (2) The focus on lean protein, fruits, and vegetables over calorie- and sodium-rich processed foods can also contribute to weight loss, though she also points out that the paleo diet wasn’t created to be a weight loss diet. (3)
Once they’re good to go, the process of making these paleo breads couldn’t be easier. It goes like this. Throw a bunch of ingredients in a food processor, and hit the “on” button to mix up the batter. Then, transfer it to a pan and bake it. The biggest challenge I have making these is to get the oven to heat as quickly as I can get the bread batter ready for it.
This is the third time I have made this bread. The first time I followed you directions and discovered the middle wasn’t quite baked all the way through. So I read some of the comments and tried it again. The second time I kept the oven temp the same and cut down on the butter and baked it for about 40-45 minutes. It turned out fine then. However it doesn’t that size of a loaf doesn’t last long in our house. So today I made it again and increased the recipe by half. I had bought a 12″ x 4.5″ x 3 ” bread loaf pan. I used 7 tbsp of Kerry Gold butter instead of 9 tbsp. Otherwise the rest was the same. I baked it at 355 degrees for 1 hour. It turned out perfectly. I couldn’t wait to let it cool too much. I love warm bread and just had to have a couple of slices. Btw- the organic almond flour I used was from our local grocery store health market section.
My son can’t have eggs, so I did MAJOR substitutions, and it still turned out yummy. We usually use flax for eggs, but since this recipe already calls for flax, I used 5 different eggs substitutes: 1/4 coconut yogurt, 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup vegetable oil (I used olive), 2 heaping tbsp potato starch, 2 heaping tbsp arrowroot powder. Perhaps because we couldn’t use the eggs, there wasn’t a hard crust, but again, it was still yummy. We have to make do in a no egg diet ;). I also didn’t have the correct size loaf pan, so I used two mini loaf pans and baked them for about 25 minutes. Hope someone sees this who has to eat an egg-free diet :).
Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Jh5J8BCUks
I was very skeptical about this recipe. But I tell you what, I was pleasantly surprised when I ate one, thick with butter. I think one could describe them as close to what we call in New Zealand, ‘scones,’ but not sure what you call scones in the US is the same thing as here. Seeing as I haven’t had a scone in such a long time it was a treat. I don’t think I would use this recipe for buns though.
The vinegar, when added last, gives the bread the rise. Often, Russian recipes call for baking soda and vinegar to give the rise (air pockets) you would normally get from yeast. I’m assuming, based on what I’ve read, that ACV has more health benefits, and a slightly different taste. I just took my bread out of the oven and it rose beautifully. Similar breads I’ve made called for less wet ingredients and were much denser. I can’t wait to cut this baby open and take a peek.

As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.

I am excited about this recipe for Paleo Sandwich Bread because even though it is completely grain and gluten free, it tastes amazing and the consistency is moist and soft just like the sandwich breads we were used to before changing our diet. In my opinion though, there is also a tiny hint of sweetness to it and this is due to the almond flour being sweeter than grain wheat flour.


Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7JHpDDGZUk
thanks for the reply, but im still confused. the arrowroot you have pictured at the bottom of the recipe is the “flour” not the powder. I used the powder. however, it was hard to find and the only bottle of it that I could find was short of the 1/2 cup required in the recipe. I see you can buy larger quantities of the powder on-line. I added a TBSP of regular baking powder to make up for the short arrowroot powder. It came out pretty good!

It’s hard to believe these snowball cookies have no flour in them when you see and taste them. But that doesn’t mean they have no flavor. These no-bake balls are bound together with Medjool dates, pecans and shredded coconut, with vanilla extract and sea salt packing a punch as well. These are a terrific treat to bring to a potluck or to nibble on guilt-free.
No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy guidelines to follow to kick-start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extent you want to follow those guidelines, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.
I just made a loaf of this last night. I followed the recipe to a T since it was the first time making. It has a very nice flavor but I would not regard it as an ideal sandwich bread. It has the texture of a light banana bread and even using a smaller loaf pan it made a tiny loaf, didn’t rise much. This is a good bread for toast but it is drier on the ends of the loaf and crumbles easily. I think if I were to make again I might use 1 and 1/2 the quantities listed and I would only bake for 30 minutes.
I am so happy to have found this delicious and easy recipe. I used a regular sized loaf pan and baked it about 5 minutes less time since the loaf is thinner. Also I think I will put a piece of parchment on the bottom of the pan next time as it stuck to the pan a little bit. I thought it had a kind of like a cornbread texture. It is so good though, I believe I will be eating some of this every day for the rest of my life. Can’t wait to try some of the suggested variations!

With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.
• Determine adequacy. Examine the diet recommendations, paying attention to foods and food groups eliminated. Ensure clients have the necessary tools to maintain proper macronutrient and micronutrient intakes. This means focusing on appropriate portion sizes and preparation techniques for fish, poultry, beef, venison, eggs, and other animal proteins, along with fruit and vegetable consumption with each meal. If clients insist on avoiding dairy and grains, find alternative ways they can meet daily requirements for nutrients such as fiber, calcium, and vitamin D. Supplementation for some nutrients may be necessary.
Add yeast and maple syrup (to feed the yeast, see notes) to a large bowl. Heat up water to 105-110°F, and if you don't have a thermometer it should only feel lightly warm to touch. Pour water over yeast mixture, cover bowl with a kitchen towel and allow to rest for 7 minutes. The mixture should be bubbly, if it isn't start again (too cold water won't activate the yeast and too hot will kill it). 
Made this today. Came out perfectly! Hubby and son are grain free, and son has Autism which comes with food sensory issues and limited palate! My son liked this bread. It’s true that it’s not a standard slice like with traditional loaves made with wheat flour, but it’s big enough to make a sandwich still. Thanks for the great recipe! Tried to rate it but it won’t let me go up to 5 stars so rather than give you less, I’ll just not rate it officially. But….5 stars!!
The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet by Robb Wolf, a research biochemist. Readers will understand digestion, how protein, carbohydrate and fat influence hormones, and how this plays into fat loss, health or disease. They'll understand the significance of dietary fats whether the concern is performance, health, longevity, or making your fanny look good in a bikini. The book goes into how lifestyle factors such as sleep and stress influence the hormone cortisol. It gets into basic blood work and what things people should ask their doctor to include to better assess inflammation and health. It also includes a detailed 30-day meal plan and a beginner exercise program. The exercise program is geared to the beginner or someone who is quite de-conditioned but the nutritional info would be helpful for anyone regardless of background. The author's website is Robb Wolf. He likes to pass out the information via weekly podcasts. Here's a video Introduction to the book. And here is an excerpt from the book: How to Keep Feces Out of Your Bloodstream (or Lose 10 Pounds in 14 Days). The many Amazon reviews all rave about the book. Published September 14, 2010.
Elana – your site is my go-to place for all baking ideas and snack recipes. I’m a huge experimenter myself, so I love using your recipes for a base (or following exactly for a trial run) and then running wild. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into making your recipes not only edible, but delicious and filling and healthful. I’m always excited for your post.

Tried making these with sunflower seed butter in a bun pan! They do come out a bit green, but I like them better than the almond butter variety. I’m using sugar free/salt free sunflower seed butter (not SunButter) and it seems to be the most filling stuff on the planet. I can’t eat more than a teaspoon of it (unlike almond butter, which I must be very careful around!), and it makes these little bread rounds very filling, too! I pour 1/4 cup of batter into each well of a standard bun pan and I get 10 or 12 little bread rounds. They’re not as tall as muffin tops, and much shorter than a yeast roll. I pop them in the toaster and spread them with butter and homemade Paleo jam. Great for breakfast!
To determine the diet rankings, US News & World Report selected a 25-person expert panel from the country's top dietitians, dietary consultants, and physicians specializing in diabetes, heart health, and weight loss. The panel included Lisa Sasson, MS, RDN, CDN, a clinical assistant professor and dietetic internship director in the department of nutrition and food studies at New York University; Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, CHWC, FAND, a nutrition and diabetes expert; and David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, FACLM, founding director of Yale University's Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and founder of the True Health Initiative.4
I wish I had taken a photo because this bread is gorgeous! My husband (who is anti-healthy food) said “I see bread like that and I want to eat it…but since you told me it was made with almonds I won’t, out of spite”…and then 10 minutes later…”that would taste really good toasted with butter” (and a big chunk was missing from the loaf). So easy to make with ingredients I always have on hand. Bravo! I will be making this weekly!
Just made this bread this morning and it was wonderful! It will be a life saver since my 2 year old and husband are obsessed with bread. My only problem was that it came out very flat (only about an 1.5-2 inches thick). The only difference I could think of was that the only yogurt I had was plain whole milk, not greek. I was thinking about doubling the batch and cooking time to see if I get a thicker loaf. Any thoughts? It makes a good snack bread, but not sandwich bread since the slices are so small (they’d be finger sandwiches). Thanks again!!
Thanks for reading this post. Of these recipes, pick one that sounds good to, and try it. These are all good recipes and fairly easy to make, I like to make the Cheesy Tapioca Flatbread, as its pretty quick and tastes great. I’ve got lots of paleo resources and recipes on here, so click around to find out more about paleo. Keep me posted on how things go and always feel free to share a story or ask a question.
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5PEhRsdGIU

Thank you for the terrific recipe. I must admit that this really turned out to be “oopsie bread” for me. Due to the expensive nature of the recipe (organic eggs, almond flour, grass fed butter) I really attempted to follow the recipe perfectly instead of going with my usual improvisational style. I also do not have a food processor however that did not impede anything… a hand mixer and a deft hand did the trick. I did add the optional xanthum gum and erythritol but not the cream of tartar. The batter filled my silicone loaf pan to the top, I smoothed it out and popped it into the oven. Then, to my horror, I saw the little pot of melted butter still on the stovetop. There was nothing to be done except cross my fingers and hope for the best.

As for the preface to it, could you be more snarky? People are curious and not every place in the world has Celtic sea salt or coconut flour easily accessible. Given that you try every minute substitution, it makes me wonder if you tried Celtic sea salt vs. Gaelic sea salt. Geez, woman, lighten up and realize that people are just tapping into your wisdom. Who knows? Maybe you tried the substitution they were asking about and you can tell them how it worked out.

Thank you for sharing this recipe, I made them in a 8 inch square baking dish and cut into 4, which worked great! I just bought a muffin top pan today and will be using that to make a double batch this weekend! Taste and texture of these are amazing! Just what I needed for sandwiches to take to work! NOW, I’m intrigued and will be trying your other recipes! Thanks again 🙂 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QL6FUI7rWUY
Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn1DcZKU53A

This is amazingly similar to real bread. I made a few changes, but I’m so happy with how it turned out! I can’t wait to make this for my Mom. Next time I will double the recipe to get normal sized bread. The changes I made were that I used 3 eggs and 1 chia egg. I also baked 10 extra minutes because of all the complaints about a doughy center, but ended up overbaking. Next time I will stick to the original baking time. Thank you so much Elana! I love your vegan herb crackers as well; I eat vegan 4 times a week and they are life savers! Definitely a staple. I can tell that they are one of the things I will be taking to college with me once I graduate in 2 years :)
The paleo diet (also nicknamed the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet) is hugely popular these days, and goes by one simple question: What would a caveman eat? Here, we explain what the paleo diet involves, its pros and cons, and, ultimately, what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqA3yHdSeSM

Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again.
I made this bread twice. The first time I followed your recipe exactly, but it came out dry and sort of tasteless. I think it’s because of my elevation and how dry the climate is here, so I added about a 1/4 c maple syrup the second time I made it and it’s perfect! I really like this recipe, and I hope others at high and dry climates don’t give up on it if they have the same problem.
So, just as I was about to put these in the oven, my 20 year old oven caught fire. After having the fire department visit, I used coconut oil spray on a glass square dish and cooked it in the microwave. Total time was about 8 minutes because I kept stopping and starting it. The recipe was delicious! Thank you to our fire department and to you for this wonderful bread alternative!

Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pWQEEzXRhM
I just made the paleo bread and I am enjoying a warm slice as I type this comment. I wanted to share that I substituted pure maple syrup for the honey and used a blender to mix since I don’t own a food processor. The loaf still came out delicious and moist. I wish I could submit a picture of my wonderful looking loaf. Thanks for sharing your recipes.
“All plants contain chlorogenic acid, mostly in the stems and leaves, but sunflowers also have it in the seeds. A spokeswoman for Red River Commodities says that SunButter does indeed turn cookies and other baked products green as they cool. The solution, she says, is to reduce the amount of baking soda or baking powder in your recipe by almost half, which balances the acidity of the ingredients and keeps them from changing color. Whether your cookies will rise adequately with half the leaven is a good question, but she says some people who have gotten in touch with the company say they don’t notice any difference. Adding a bit of lemon juice to your dough or batter can also help maintain expected colors. ”
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrcSUhdBgtc
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