I made this today and here’s what I used as far as brands: Bob’s Red Mill Superfine Almond Flour (made with blanched almonds-no skins), Bob’s Red Mill Arrowroot Flour, Tillamook Butter, Zoi Greek Yogurt, Kirkland Salt, Arm & Hammer Baking Soda, Bragg’s Apple Cider Vinegar, and ground & whole flaxseed from the bulk bins at WinCo. I also added maybe a tablespoon of honey and used extra large eggs. I read through most of the reviews and based on one I decided to mix the dry ingredients as stated and mix the wet ingredients leaving the egg whites out. I whipped the egg whites until soft peaks formed and then gently mixed wet and dry ingredients together. Lastly, I gently folded in the egg whites, poured the batter into a pan lined with ungreased parchment paper, and topped with whole flax seeds. I baked this in a 7.75″ x 3″ Fat Daddio bread pan at 350 degrees for 35 minutes. It is perfect. It even rose about an inch. Perfectly baked, sliced very easily (very little crumble), and made a delicious (not too eggy) turkey sandwich. I’m super impressed. Thanks for sharing this recipe!!

This cornbread is cooked up southern style, but because it’s using ingredients that are Paleo friendly it clocks in as a low-carb food. Isn’t it nice to not have to worry about carbs, calories, fat grams, points, or any other silly thing they have you counting on other diet programs. With Paleo your focus is on using pure, wholesome, natural ingredients and eating until you feel satisfied. It’s about taking a philosophy towards food that is more in line with our body’s natural state of being, before we went and mucked things up with agriculture. This cornbread goes great with a bowl of Paleo chili.


The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4j4JsvIvaQ
I haven’t tested this recipe without tapioca starch, but in the Notes section above I list a few of the substitutions I’ve tested and had success with. Tapioca starch helps to add rise and bounce to this loaf, making it somewhat “fluffy” and closer to the texture of regular bread. If you decide to experiment with this recipe using something other than tapioca starch, please let me know what works!
This bread, I guess you could say, has more of a “cake-y” texture than a real “bread-y” feel to it: it’s really soft and moist, kind of like a heavy pound cake, perhaps, but one that would be savory. Not an unpleasant texture at all, if you ask me, and it’s so crazy tasty and more-ish, you soon get to thinking that you’d much rather be eating this than any old piece of traditional bread.
For those who were considering ordering Paleo bread from the Julian Bakery online, just a word of caution: beware! The bad reviews are really true, and I’m not one who usually does any online reviews. I have ordered both the almond and the coconut breads for awhile. I am not sure what to make of the taste of them, but the almond is definitely a no-go for me. The coconut was palatable, if you chug down some liquid with it and pretend you’re not about to choke! It’s gagging, tasteless, and soggy-at-times bread, but I guess I was desperate for a slice, truly desperate to think it was edible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDoRiF8zj5Y
There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet.
Stacey thank you for that, I am trying out keto stuffing for Thanksgiving. Paola thank you for this recipe. I have made it twice. First time was a bit slimy as I didn’t grind my flours (lesson learned). 2nd one was perfection. My bread rises wonderfully. I put it out in my garage or on my back porch to rise…of course Yuma Arizona gives me a warmth advantage. Not sure how it will work in winter.
Thanks for asking (kinda). Back in the day, about two years ago, I baked nonstop. I baked even more than I do now that I have a food blog (which is A LOT). Every day, I would make 4-6 batches of cookies. Then, I’d make nice cream (which was called banana soft serve back then), meal prep for the next two weeks, then spend the night putting together packages for my sisters.
Add yeast and maple syrup (to feed the yeast, see notes) to a large bowl. Heat up water to 105-110°F, and if you don't have a thermometer it should only feel lightly warm to touch. Pour water over yeast mixture, cover bowl with a kitchen towel and allow to rest for 7 minutes. The mixture should be bubbly, if it isn't start again (too cold water won't activate the yeast and too hot will kill it). 
Just made this bread and I was excited to try it because I’ve missed bread something awful since I’ve been on Paleo for the last 2 months. I didn’t have flax meal so I substituted hemp seeds that I ground with a coffee grinder to make a meal. I also used organic agave instead of honey. I beat the eggs the egg mixture for a few minutes on med-high speed to get more air into the batter. I used a 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 glass pyrex loaf pan. The batter rose nicely and filled the pan. It tasted good and I’m happy to have some kind of bread that I can eat.
What a fantastic recipe! I just made this and my house smells like sweet, toasty almonds. The texture is light and fluffy. Can’t wait to toast it gently in my oven in the morning with a little peach jam :) I used a glass pyrex loaf pan and lined it with parchment paper and lightly oiled it with coconut oil and it came out perfect,for anyone wondering about the specific pan you mentioned, which i haven’t heard of either. Thanks for this great recipe!
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
The aspects of the Paleo diet that advise eating fewer processed foods and less sugar and salt are consistent with mainstream advice about diet.[1] Diets with a paleo nutrition pattern have some similarities to traditional ethnic diets such as the Mediterranean diet that have been found to be healthier than the Western diet.[3][6] Following the Paleo diet, however, can lead to nutritional deficiencies such as those of vitamin D and calcium, which in turn could lead to compromised bone health;[1][20] it can also lead to an increased risk of ingesting toxins from high fish consumption.[3]
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.

I am trying this recipe for the very first time. It’s in the oven as I type! I am only 30 hours into a Paleo diet shift, and I am so happy to find a paleo bread recipe. I like eating extra virgin olive oil with bread to get more healthy fat into my diet, and this recipe will allow me to do just that. I am pursuing a paleo – possibly keto – diet for health reasons that also include a diagnosis of MS.


Hey Deena, I also live in Kansas City and I’ve made this bread 2 times, also making it right now. The first time it came out perfect. The second time it didn’t rise as mush as the first but the bread was still better then any other. I always make sure the house is (hot) and everything is done by the stove 😉 I make it when no one is home but me… You can do it!!
thanks for the reply, but im still confused. the arrowroot you have pictured at the bottom of the recipe is the “flour” not the powder. I used the powder. however, it was hard to find and the only bottle of it that I could find was short of the 1/2 cup required in the recipe. I see you can buy larger quantities of the powder on-line. I added a TBSP of regular baking powder to make up for the short arrowroot powder. It came out pretty good!
I made this last night and frankly, I’m SHOCKED at how delicious this is! It reminds me of Ezekiel bread, which I love. Making it in the food processor helped it come together so quickly, which I always appreciate. The only adaptation I made was skipping the maple syrup as we are avoiding sweeteners. I found that it took about 30 minutes to cook through, but mine puffed up a lot in the center, and that’s where it needed the additional cooking time. It is definitely savory without any sweeteners, but I ate it this morning topped with a smear of cashew butter and bananas and found that the flavor balance was nice. Thanks for a great recipe!
Hi Kim, thank you for your feedback. I think it’s interesting that the recipe turned out well using coconut flour instead. I would love it if you could post a photo of your bread here in the comments so I can see it. Substituting coconut flour for almond flour is tricky, and I think it worked out for you because you cut the amount of flour added in half.

I make my own ACV from apple scraps. It’s so easy….after peeling and coring apples for another recipe, you take the scraps, let them air dry for a bit, then put them in a jar with water, cover with coffee filter and rubberband, put in cabinet and let it sit. 3 days is minimum, and better is 5-6 weeks or longer. I have let it sit for months and have come out with a great product. My first batch, I did add a couple tablespoons of Braggs as a starter. This will create a “mother” you can use over and over again. It’s a continuous process…and you never run out of ACV! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PitZcopXOA
Carol: For anyone gluten intolerant, or worse, that’s a given. What quickly becomes apparent to anyone providing for this aspect of diet and reads labels, is that commercially available i.e. highly processed versions of bread etc are ridiculously loaded with poor quality fats, sugars and yet other refined flours etc to ‘compensate’ for wheat comfort. No, gluten free food, as in what is usually available to mimic where flour is widely used ‘n’ enjoyed in bought ready-to-eat products, is far from healthy…. why we’re here!
Kim, thanks for your comment. I’ve baked this bread at both sea level and 8,000 feet and haven’t found any need for adjustments. The issue is likely the size pan that you baked the bread in. If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the bread “rising” and the height of the loaf :-) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTU353BN-wM
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
Oh me… oh my. Back then, I would have pulled out the food processor, opened up my bulk bag of almonds and blended for a good 5-15 minutes ’til I got just the perfect smooth consistency of creamy almond butter. Then, carefully transfer that mess-prone goop (scientific name for nut butter consistency) into a large Tupperware, spend like 15 good minutes wiping off flecks of almond butter goop that had flown all over the kitchen, then wash all the dishes (you know how long this takes when you have almond butter grease staunchly refusing to let go of its dish territory), then dry all the dishes (because: counter space, ‘nuff said), then make these bars.
These looked amazing, so I made them. We are GF in this house and these are perfect for us. My 11 & 7 yo boys asked for more. That never happens with GF products. This is the first recipe that I have made at home that is easy and taste great. Thank you so much for posting! Just an FYI – Nutiva makes a organic, non gmo blend of red palm and coconut oils shortening. That is what I used and they came out awesome.
Hi Danielle, The bread will not rise without the baking powder, but you could try it if you don’t mind that. Some people make homemade baking powder with baking soda, cream of tartar, and arrowroot powder. But, arrowroot is still a very small amount of starch. Divided among the slices, it’s actually fewer carbs than some of the other ingredients (e.g. almond flour has a small amount of carbs also).
Hi Lina, the secret to baking perfectly with almond flour is by using the “right” kind almond flour. This means your almond flour should be ground into fine powder and have the skin removed. There are only a few brands I recommend. Both Honeyville and Welbee’s blanched almond flour work well for baking. Bob’s Red Mill brand will not works, it creates oily, dense baked goods that also sink in the middle.

Elana – I would love it if you would share more of your cooking notes with your readers. I think it would really help those of us who need or want to experiment with ingredients and/or quantities. For instance, I made this bread and find it too “eggy” so I might try it again with one fewer egg. If I knew more about your process it could help mine. Thanks for all of your hard work! I get frustrated with one bad cooking experiment — you do it for a living!
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbZaUqW_zBc
Mine had a distinct ammonia scent, which I noticed from the comments was an issue for a few other posters as well. My research tells me not enough acid in my batch to neutralize the soda. I may have left it a bit too long in my processor because my coconut oil was lumpy and I was trying to break it up. It tastes a bit like Irish soda bread, which is not my favorite. I’m thinking of experimenting with baking powder instead to suit my personal preference.

Nice and firm. Baked it on the recommended temp, added 6 or 7 minutes. Pressed the middle and it was great. I let it cool. What was nice about it was obviously it’s low carb bread…hurray for that, but it cut well. Got 18 slices easily about 1/2 inch thick without breakage. Most importantly, it wasn’t greasy, or almond tasting overload, just delicious.

These are AMAZING! I have celiac and was diagnosed about 4 months ago. It’s been very difficult and bread is what I miss most. Unfortunately, GF bread is not very tasty-i’ve tried a number of brands and have tried making my own. I love the simplicity of the recipe as well. Thank you for creating amazing clean recipes, your cookie bars are also fabulous!
Adoption of the Paleolithic diet assumes that modern humans can reproduce the hunter-gatherer diet. Molecular biologist Marion Nestle argues that "knowledge of the relative proportions of animal and plant foods in the diets of early humans is circumstantial, incomplete, and debatable and that there are insufficient data to identify the composition of a genetically determined optimal diet. The evidence related to Paleolithic diets is best interpreted as supporting the idea that diets based largely on plant foods promote health and longevity, at least under conditions of food abundance and physical activity."[35] Ideas about Paleolithic diet and nutrition are at best hypothetical.[36]
I just made this recipe and it was AMAZING! I used almond meal (because I just made almond milk a few days ago, so the “meal” was what I had left over). It came out so moist, light and fluffy….not dense at all! Do you think it would freeze well? What would happen if I only put 3 eggs in? Have you tried less eggs? Thanks for posting such a great recipe!
Excluding foods. The exclusion of entire categories of commonly eaten foods like whole grains and dairy requires frequent label reading in the supermarket and in restaurants. It may also increase the risk of deficiencies such as calcium, vitamin D, and B vitamins, if these nutrients are not consistently eaten from the allowed foods or a vitamin supplement. For example, there are some nondairy calcium-rich foods that are absorbed well by the body such as collard and turnip greens or canned bone-in sardines and salmon, but you would have to eat five or more servings of these greens and fish bones daily to meet recommended calcium needs. (Note that some greens like spinach that are touted to be calcium-rich also contain oxalates and phytates that bind to calcium so very little is actually absorbed.) One small, short-term intervention study of healthy participants showed a 53% decrease from baseline in calcium intake after following a Paleo diet for three weeks. [8] Furthermore, the exclusion of whole grains can result in reduced consumption of beneficial nutrients such as fiber and thus may increase one’s risk for diabetes and heart disease.

I have made the new recipe many times and it is really delicious. By mistake I used regular almond flour and the bread came out just as tasty as if I had used blanched almond flour. Also, coconut flour is not available where I live, so I substituted the same amount of unsweetened shredded coconut, and 1/4 cup oil for the coconut oil, since my friends said the bread had too much of a coconut flavor. The substitutions worked just fine and the bread was delicious!!! Maybe it would be even more delicious if I followed your recipe exactly, but even my son, who usually does not like “healthy” food, told me it was really good, and keeps helping himself to more slices everythime I make it.
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!
thank you for prompt reply. I do hope it tastes better than other low carb bread I’ve made and thrown out because I dislike the taste and sometimes it was too wet. It looks great so will try and report back. I must find something I like as at the moment am tucking into “normal” bread and that’s not good for my wastline or my diabetes. Thanks for the inspiring recipes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKHpXiHj_KU

This bread has changed the game on my Keto lifestyle!!!! I have tried so many different Keto breads that I just gave up! They all have to much egg taste or they’re so gritty I cannot even swallow it! This bread was more detailed to make but it is the best tasting (real) bread. It actually smelled like home made bread before I baked it! It has gotten much easier each time. I cut the loaf into 3 large pieces. I freeze two and leave one out to enjoy! I’ve made stuffing with this bread and it was amazing! Just slice thin and leave it out to dry completely until it will easily crumble. It makes amazing french toast! I had French toast with 2 eggs and bacon for breakfast today! Make sure you use sugar free syrup and your in heaven! Lots of melted butter on top!!! Thank you so much for this incredible recipe!


How quickly I have gone back on my promise to stop talking about the weather, but seriously, with a heatwave like we’re having right now, how can anyone be expected to focus on anything else? And I don’t know about you, but these days turning on the oven feels like a mortal sin. If you live in a place where you can even consider turning on your oven right now, I envy you. But for the rest of us, short of starvation (or, at the very least, dessert withdrawal), the only solution is a no-bake treat. All of these paleo desserts fit the bill. 
Hi hi, not sure if this will help but you can use chia seeds in place of eggs. 1 tbsp to 4-5 tbsp of water. Whisk and let it sit in the fridge for 15 minutes. You may need to add more water if the mix is too thick, when I make it I aim for the consistency of raw egg, so goopy but a little runny. You can sub 1 tbsp of chia seeds for 1 egg in any recipe, Goodluck!!

Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat by Nell Stephenson. Paleoista is not only a how-to book, it is also a glimpse into the life of a woman who gives advice on how to eat this way, and lives the life, day in and day out. The author's websites: NellStephenson.com Nutrition & Fitness and Paleoista.com. To be published May 1, 2012.
There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahgdolunZDE
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