On his website, Sisson writes that "while the world has changed in innumerable ways in the last 10,000 years (for better and worse), the human genome has changed very little and thus only thrives under similar conditions." This is simply not true. In fact, this reasoning misconstrues how evolution works. If humans and other organisms could only thrive in circumstances similar to the ones their predecessors lived in, life would not have lasted very long.
Experts estimate that our ancestors consumed a one-to-one ratio of calories from meats to produce. Since you have to eat a lot of salad to consume the same amount of calories in a steak, the paleo diet should ideally include mostly fruits and vegetables, Katz says. However, many people don't realize that and eat too much meat. Consuming excess protein and not enough carbs can cause kidney damage and also increase your risk of osteoporosis, Dr. Ochner says. Plus, since most of today's meats are higher in saturated fat than those of yesteryear, it can increase the risk of heart disease, Dr. Katz says.

In William Calvin's The Ascent of Mind, Chapter 8 he discusses why he thinks that the Acheulian hand-ax (the oldest of the fancy stone tools of Homo erectus) was really a "killer frisbee." He argues that natural selection for throwing accuracy, which requires brain machinery, is the evolutionary scenario for bootstrapping higher intellectual functions. There are many more articles about evolution and human development throughout William's extensive site, though much of it these days is on climate change.
Hi I am new to the grain free diet and I love this bread. Has anyone figured out the calorie count for it? I have been gluten free since 2003 and it has served me well, although I think that I could benefit from grain free. But like all diet changes that I have tried in the past I tend to gain weight if I do not know the calorie count of the new recipes. Thanks.
But critics argue that the unlimited amount of red meat the paleo diet allows may have an adverse effect on heart health in people with diabetes, as research links eating red meat in excess to poor heart health. (11)  If you have diabetes and don’t moderate your red-meat intake, this could be a big problem, as people with diabetes are 2 times as likely to die of heart disease as people who do not have diabetes. (12)

I’ve gone around the web finding the best fast easy, and absolutely delicious easy paleo desserts. Because eating paleo is hard enough without having to spend two hours making a complicated dessert only to have it come out badly because paleo baking is so darn finicky. All of the recipes in this roundup are tried, tested, and true, take 45 minutes or less to prepare, and should satisfy all your cravings for easy paleo desserts. So let’s get started!
I haven’t tested this recipe without tapioca starch, but in the Notes section above I list a few of the substitutions I’ve tested and had success with. Tapioca starch helps to add rise and bounce to this loaf, making it somewhat “fluffy” and closer to the texture of regular bread. If you decide to experiment with this recipe using something other than tapioca starch, please let me know what works!
Often Keto and Paleo recipes get grouped together which is how I found you…I am on Keto though, and the tapioca flour and applesauce bring the carb amounts up too high. Do you have a low carb alternative for these ingredients? Is there a way to sub coconut flour for the tapioca by adjusting the ratios of the coconut flour to liquid. I may be able to get by using the applesauce (I think that will be ok if no more than 1/4 c,) but would still need a compensating liquid. Any suggestions? I so want this to be my answer to a long search for a decent bread substitute.
Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.
But human populations in different regions of the world ate a variety of diets. Some ate more; some ate less. They likely ate meat only when they could get it, and then they gorged. Richard Wrangham, author of Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, says diets from around the world ranged greatly in the percentage of calories from meat. It’s not cooked meat that made us human, he says, but rather cooked food.
The data for Cordain's book only came from six contemporary hunter-gatherer groups, mainly living in marginal habitats.[37] One of the studies was on the !Kung, whose diet was recorded for a single month, and one was on the Inuit.[37][38][39] Due to these limitations, the book has been criticized as painting an incomplete picture of the diets of Paleolithic humans.[37] It has been noted that the rationale for the diet does not adequately account for the fact that, due to the pressures of artificial selection, most modern domesticated plants and animals differ drastically from their Paleolithic ancestors; likewise, their nutritional profiles are very different from their ancient counterparts. For example, wild almonds produce potentially fatal levels of cyanide, but this trait has been bred out of domesticated varieties using artificial selection. Many vegetables, such as broccoli, did not exist in the Paleolithic period; broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale are modern cultivars of the ancient species Brassica oleracea.[29]
I made this bread the other day following the recipe to the T, and although it tasted delicious, I did have some problems with it. I used the same size pan and my bread came out to be about half as tall as whats pictured. Also, the first time I took it out of the oven it was still raw inside even after cooking for quite a long time, so I had to put it back in. This wouldnt be a problem, except I found that when it was finally all cooked through, It had such a thick crust on top that I couldn’t cut it without it crumbling all to pieces. Any suggestions on how to get it to rise more and how to prevent the ultra-thick crust from forming on top?
Hi Kristi, I’m glad you liked the taste! Sorry it didn’t rise for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Were the peaks in the egg whites not firm enough, or did they fall too much when folding with the rest of the batter? That is the main culprit I can think of, as the egg whites are a big part of what creates the volume in this bread.
I wanted to say thank you for the recipe. I made it today with my Vitamix. I used whole raw almonds and whole flax seed that I ground up in the Vitamix in batches rather than almond flour and flaxseed meal. I substituted two single serving packages of stevia for the honey and mixed everything in the Vitamix. My bread turned out great and tastes wonderful. The almond skins and stevia changed the color a little from the picture on the web site but my loaf still looks good (lighter crust and darker interior). (I used 1.5 cups of whole almonds, 2 tablespoons coconut flour, ¼ cup of whole flaxseeds, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1.5 teaspoons baking soda, 5 large eggs, ¼ cup coconut oil, 2 packets of stevia, and 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in the Magic Loaf Pan.) Thanks again.
Bill, my regular sized loaf pans are 9X5, and a loaf that size would require 3 cups of flour, 1 cup of water along with a little yeast, oil, salt and sugar. Before baking, the dough would be allowed to rise until doubled in volume, completely filling the pan and rising slightly over the top. This dough won’t even come close to filling that size loaf pan and it isn’t going to rise much. In fact about the best you’re going to get is that it will “puff” up a little from the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar, plus a bit more from the steam released during baking. I would suggest a much smaller loaf pan. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 X 3.5. Don’t be a slave to those numbers, find something close. My pans are old and some probably aren’t even being made anymore so just do what you can. Also, this recipe is going to create more of a batter than a dough, don’t leave it sit too long before putting it in the oven or the chemical reaction between the baking soda and vinegar will be all over before it even starts to bake. My suggestion is get it in the oven as soon as you can after mixing the ingredients. That way you’ll get as much rise as possible from the mixture. Good luck!

I love this recipe! This last time I made it, I split the dough into 6 rounds and baked it in my bun pan, making 6 “hamburger buns”. I like this size better than the loaf slices because I can get a more substantial sandwich. It held up great to a BBQ chicken sandwich as well as a simple almond butter and jelly sandwich… I think this will be my preferred way of baking the bread. Thanks for such a great recipe, Elana, I love it!
There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahgdolunZDE
Thank you for sharing this recipe, I made them in a 8 inch square baking dish and cut into 4, which worked great! I just bought a muffin top pan today and will be using that to make a double batch this weekend! Taste and texture of these are amazing! Just what I needed for sandwiches to take to work! NOW, I’m intrigued and will be trying your other recipes! Thanks again 🙂
Jump up ^ Ramsden, C.; Faurot, K.; Carrera-Bastos, P.; Cordain, L.; De Lorgeril, M.; Sperling, L. (2009). "Dietary Fat Quality and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Unified Theory Based on Evolutionary, Historical, Global, and Modern Perspectives". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine. 11 (4): 289–301. doi:10.1007/s11936-009-0030-8. PMID 19627662.

Traditional lemon bars are so good, but that sugar high comes with a subsequent crash. That’s not the case with this Paleo-friendly version. Using honey instead of refined sugar keeps things sweet without throwing your blood sugar out of whack, while using coconut flour in the crust makes it perfectly crunchy. Make an extra batch because these will go quickly.
Thanks so much for the link love, dear Elana! I’m so, so happy you are enjoying our bees’ honey! :-) I’ve been making a similar paleo bread of late, but mine doesn’t contain coconut flour or ACV. I’m intrigued with your variations, but more importantly I know it’s good as you have just posted this recipe and I’ve already seen folks reference it in their posts! Now that’s a stellar recommendation, my friend! ;-)
Another possibility is that maybe your oven is not well calibrater (which is normal) and your bread needed to cook longer. I suggest next time you insert the stick in a few areas to ensure it’s done throughout. Also, it’s a good idea to purchase an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature is where you want it during baking. They cost less that $20, I got mine for less than $10.
photo sources: cavemen elephant hunt, caveman cooking over fire, cavemen hunt paleo bear, milk truck logo, darth vader vendor, storm trooper tomato, lego cook, chef and lego pig, lego explorer, lego muffin, lego bread and carbs, frozen caveman grok lego, lego clock, lego caveman forging for food, caveman with wheel, darth vader and ostrich lego, easing into water lego, lego man with pasta https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9nD6DEQ1-U
Sugar is almost always manufactured and should be avoided on the paleo diet. This means you’ll need to cut out the delicious but destructive sweets and sugars that are standard in the Standard American Diet. The rule of thumb here is: if it contains a ton of sugar, it’s probably not on the paleo diet friendly. That said, here’s a specific lists of sweets that are not on the paleo diet food list. You might want to take a moment to say goodbye to them before you start your paleo diet journey.

One of the foods that people tell us they miss most after going keto is bread. (And cookies or cakes, but you get the idea.) We get it, bread is undeniably comfort food. Growing up, it wasn’t unheard of to eat toast for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch, and maybe even a slice of buttered bread along with dinner. Not only is that ton of carbs, but it’s also a lot of empty calories when we could have been eating real-food alternatives, like this bread made from nutrient-dense ingredients!
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LssXGFdueFM
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