I would first like to thank you so very much for your recipes, research and website…I Love them all!! I make your paleo bread every week and have been substituting egg whites for the eggs and I notice that my bread always has a crack in the center. It could be the oven, I’m not sure, but I really like the way it turns out with the egg whites. I make a double batch and bake it in a big bread pan so it is more like a loaf of sandwich bread. Thanks again for all you do
And now we know that microbes, such as those in our gut, play a key role in our health, as well. The microbes we eat in foods like pickles may not take up a permanent home in our innards; rather, they seem to be more akin to transient visitors, says Pollan. Still, “fermented foods provide a lot of compounds that gut microbes like,” and he says he makes sure to eat some fermented vegetables every day. 

A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKFa7KW3Nmk
Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcDZiQVWEPw
Hello! I was wondering if you had ever doubled or tripled the recipe in order to use a standard size loaf pan? I wasn’t paying attention to the size and made a regular recipe in a standard loaf pan and the results were, well, flat. Then I realized my goof. Hoping to avoid the purchase of another pan, but will definitely buy a new one if it means I can make this bread! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0Zz6z5GaVE
Elana – your site is my go-to place for all baking ideas and snack recipes. I’m a huge experimenter myself, so I love using your recipes for a base (or following exactly for a trial run) and then running wild. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into making your recipes not only edible, but delicious and filling and healthful. I’m always excited for your post.
Thanks Kaylie. I used the ingredients I had at hand so that is why I did what I did. Can I eliminate the maple syrup without loosing something? Don’t like the sweet taste. I will try the other recipe first and let you know how I make out. Thanks for getting back to me. We need everyone’s expertise. Glad you like my adventurous spirit….making mistakes is just so much fun!!! :^)
Just made this bread and it’s in the oven as I write this. Can anyone tell me what the consistency of the dough/batter should be? Mine looked a little runny, almost like pancake batter. I can’t see if the bread is rising in the oven because the parchment paper is obscuring my view. I don’t want to open the oven door yet in case that causes the bread to sink in the middle. Anybody have the same batter like consistency and if so, how was yours?
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4j4JsvIvaQ
I think red meat from grain fed cattle and sheep IS bad for us . These animals were designed to eat grass. We were designed to eat meat, fat, vegetables , a few seeds and a little seasonal fruit. But never any kind of grain. ! When Man began farming and grain consumption , so began disease and illness. Today our food supply is being contaminated by Factory farming and GMOs.

Slight changes I had to make: pumpkin puree in place of the applesauce (1:1), a whoopie pie pan in place of the ring molds, and I baked for 12 minutes instead of 15. The pan yielded 8 “rolls” which I sliced *very* thinly to make some jam and nut butter sandwiches. Delicious! Thanks so much for the recipe! (I found this recipe via Pinterest, by the way.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlAiM0E68Oc

Thank you so much for this recipe! I have tried so many paleo bread recipes and this is the best one yet. My husband devoured half of it and he’s a very picky eater. I’m going to double the recipe next time so I can use my larger bread pan. I do have one question though. Do you think this recipe would work if I added bananas, or blueberries? I was thinking of doing that but wasn’t sure if that would effect the consistency.


It took me a few days to finally getting around to making these but I did because of your sloppy joe recipe you just posted. They are awesome!!! Next time I will make a double batch of buns! I used a muffin top pan for the buns and they came out perfect for tops and bottoms so I didn’t even have to split them. They bakes up really smooth and held together perfectly for wet sloppy joes! Thanks so much for developing and sharing your recipes. I am definitely becoming one of your biggest followers! Everything you make “works”!
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQDpobq7jYY&t=91s
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